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Subject: "Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chronic" Previous topic | Next topic
Black N Proud
Member since May 06th 2006
2510 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 12:48 AM

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"Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chronic"


          

What was the hype like then? What were people thinking and saying (about a Dr. Dre solo album?) especially since Dr. Dre had left Ruthless Records right after finishing up recording N.W.A's platinum Niggaz4Life album; and having Straight Outta Comtpon, Eazy Duz It, No One Can Do It Better and Michell'e's album attached to his name. Did people not even second guess that The Chronic wouldn't be a classic? Was it immediately when people heard Nuthin But a G Thang and or Let Me Ride that they knew Dre would deliver a classic album?

If you can remember exactly what it was like leading up too and after the release of Dr. Dre's classic album please discuss and speak on it.

  

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Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
RE: Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chr...
Sep 24th 2011
1
RE: Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chr...
Sep 24th 2011
4
oh man the deep cover song had dropped and the hype was on
Sep 24th 2011
2
Did you know the minute you heard Deep Cover....
Sep 24th 2011
3
oh no doubt i was at a house party and folks was like check out
Sep 24th 2011
5
RE: oh no doubt i was at a house party and folks was like check out
Sep 24th 2011
7
      oh Man back then Cube was on the Pulse
Sep 24th 2011
12
           Very interesting post, especially the part on Pac. Great points.
Sep 24th 2011
14
                it doesn't get talked about in that way or content, however
Sep 24th 2011
16
                     It really is interesting at how things have changed drastically.
Sep 24th 2011
18
                          hip hop especially because it wasn't that long ago you got old
Sep 24th 2011
19
RE: Did you know the minute you heard Deep Cover....
Sep 24th 2011
21
RE: oh man the deep cover song had dropped and the hype was on
Sep 25th 2011
58
A lot of people were doubting Dre
Sep 24th 2011
6
I was interested in hearing about the doubters too.
Sep 24th 2011
10
      he was doubted because NWA was a Brand
Sep 24th 2011
13
           RE: he was doubted because NWA was a Brand
Sep 24th 2011
15
                he also had time to map things out
Sep 24th 2011
17
                     It really is interesting when you look back at it.
Sep 24th 2011
26
                          it wasn't nearly as corperated as it is now
Sep 24th 2011
48
I can only speak personally.....
Sep 24th 2011
8
Good point, great read...
Sep 24th 2011
20
i'd argue
Sep 24th 2011
34
      There's some truth to this.
Sep 25th 2011
62
People knew it was going to be pretty big
Sep 24th 2011
9
Great story and post. Thanks
Sep 24th 2011
11
RE: People knew it was going to be pretty big
Sep 26th 2011
70
1992 was a different time
Sep 24th 2011
22
all true Co Sign
Sep 24th 2011
23
In the moment
Sep 24th 2011
31
Couldn't agree more.
Sep 25th 2011
56
What kind of hypothetical is this?
Sep 24th 2011
25
That album catapulted him to celebrity
Sep 24th 2011
27
      But you're hypothetically asking:
Sep 24th 2011
30
           No, what I'm saying is
Sep 24th 2011
32
                One could easily make an argument that...
Sep 24th 2011
33
                     Well that is kind of the argument I'm tryin to make
Sep 24th 2011
35
                          The Nas/"Illmatic" comparison is moot with Dr. Dre
Sep 24th 2011
39
                               No shit
Sep 24th 2011
42
                                    lol
Sep 25th 2011
53
Great read, thanks!
Sep 24th 2011
28
That's some serious revisionist history
Sep 24th 2011
38
      revisionist history or not, i can only speak from my perspective
Sep 24th 2011
41
      I'm merely correcting your statement about Hip Hop's lack of coastal iss...
Sep 24th 2011
43
           So you think all those acts I named get deals
Sep 24th 2011
45
                You actually think most artists sell everywhere?
Sep 25th 2011
50
                     Yeah and no
Sep 26th 2011
67
                          RE: Yeah and no
Sep 26th 2011
71
                          In the early days absolutely
Sep 27th 2011
76
                               I feel like you're taking bits and pieces from different eras
Sep 27th 2011
77
                                    My point is the Chronic broke down Coastal Biases
Sep 28th 2011
81
                                         I'm not from NYC
Sep 28th 2011
82
                                              Ok we're obviously talking about different things here
Sep 29th 2011
98
                                                   Boyz n the Hood...1991
Sep 29th 2011
100
                                                        So now you're bringing up movies?
Sep 29th 2011
102
      Agreed, there's a lot of revisionism here
Sep 28th 2011
86
G Thang
Sep 24th 2011
24
i never anticipated anything Dre put out: ever
Sep 24th 2011
29
RE: i never anticipated anything Dre put out: ever
Sep 26th 2011
72
I also remember the anticipation/release of
Sep 24th 2011
36
I remember the commercial for it
Sep 24th 2011
47
From a youngsters perspective
Sep 25th 2011
52
      Ren's verse on '100 Miles' is one of the best in rap music, period
Sep 26th 2011
69
Yes I. Take a hit of the Chronic with Dr. Dre. December 15th. Right
Sep 24th 2011
37
RE: Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chr...
Sep 24th 2011
40
I first heard it on my sky tell pager
Sep 24th 2011
44
you can't even appreciate what daytona spring break '93 was like...
Sep 24th 2011
46
RE: Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chr...
Sep 24th 2011
49
I couldn't tell you a
Sep 25th 2011
51
we were getting our driver's licenses then.
Sep 25th 2011
54
nothing on the Chronic was as good as "Deep Cover"
Sep 25th 2011
55
I laughed.
Sep 25th 2011
57
This was EXACTLY how I felt
Sep 25th 2011
60
lmao... how does it feel to be different?
Sep 25th 2011
61
sorry i was never into "G FUNK" .....
Sep 25th 2011
63
      I can actually see an East Coast head feeling that way
Sep 26th 2011
66
      RE: I can actually see an East Coast head feeling that way
Sep 26th 2011
74
      I think that might have been my favorite album cut
Sep 28th 2011
83
      come on bro, you had to TRY not listening to that album... it owned
Sep 26th 2011
75
      A whole lot of that album isn't what's become known as "G-Funk" though
Sep 28th 2011
84
      RE: A whole lot of that album isn't what's become known as "G-Funk" thou...
Sep 28th 2011
88
      Cmon dogg...
Sep 28th 2011
87
           never said it was smooth...
Sep 28th 2011
96
lol the east coast bias is strong with this one
Sep 27th 2011
78
      I'm talkin steroid enhanced 800 bench press maximum strong
Sep 28th 2011
91
Hmm...
Sep 25th 2011
59
RE: Hmm...
Sep 25th 2011
64
RE: Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chr...
Sep 26th 2011
65
it was more of a regional thing
Sep 26th 2011
68
I actually learned who Dre + Snoop were b/c of my Godsister from
Sep 28th 2011
92
Great Post
Sep 26th 2011
73
Last CD I bought that came in that long cardboard box
Sep 27th 2011
79
Ha Yeah I Remember That
Sep 27th 2011
80
had just moved to LA summer of 92...i remember the day
Sep 28th 2011
85
who was ghost writing for dre on 'the chronic'?
Sep 28th 2011
89
I thought it was Snoop and DOC no? Maybe Kurupt too?
Sep 28th 2011
90
Mostly DOC I Think
Sep 28th 2011
94
Possibly Deadly Threatt. Possibly MF Grimm
Sep 28th 2011
93
For real? I never heard this.
Sep 28th 2011
95
      I heard from a few cats that Threat ghost-wrote for a lot...
Sep 29th 2011
101
RE: who was ghost writing for dre on 'the chronic'?
Sep 28th 2011
97
      Is Haven't You Heard Good?
Sep 29th 2011
99
           i loved it
Sep 30th 2011
103

melanon
Member since Oct 21st 2003
2012 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 01:00 AM

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1. "RE: Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chr..."
In response to Reply # 0
Sat Sep-24-11 01:03 AM by melanon

          

barely any hype from what i recall. it sort of came out and spoke for itself. it was actually confusing to me musically at the time. i'd not particularly liked the early G Funk stylings employed on Nigaz4life and was a tad resistant to an entire album based around that whistle keyboard sound.


that lasted about one or two days then i fell in line.

  

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Black N Proud
Member since May 06th 2006
2510 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 01:29 AM

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4. "RE: Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chr..."
In response to Reply # 1


          

>barely any hype from what i recall. it sort of came out and
>spoke for itself. it was actually confusing to me musically
>at the time. i'd not particularly liked the early G Funk
>stylings employed on Nigaz4life and was a tad resistant to an
>entire album based around that whistle keyboard sound.
>
>
>that lasted about one or two days then i fell in line.

Which single was it that drew you in, Nuthin But a G Thang or Let Me Ride?

  

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mistermaxxx08
Member since Dec 31st 2010
16076 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 01:09 AM

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2. "oh man the deep cover song had dropped and the hype was on"
In response to Reply # 0


          

i'm telling you back then I thought that Snoop Dogg and Dr. Dre were going to be the Hip Hop version of Michael Jackson adn Quincy Jones.


deep cover was the cut, while the movie was wack.

nothin but a g thang truly had heads bopping.

that was the album were the burbs lost there mind on the sho nuff and the hood was equal over it as well.

that album felt so good that i bet Burl ives got a Buzz.

suge and dr dre were looking so green and got rejected by all the labels.

John Mcclain the same Brother who runs Michael Jackson's estate helped get the chronic out there and at one time he had a minor stake in interscope records.


all them labels told me now until Jimmy "I own you" Iovine and Ted Fields said green light.


i remember the release part and how fresh and green everybody was.

seeing RBX, the D.O.C. and others on board was something else back then.

mistermaxxx R.Kelly, Michael Jackson,Stevie wonder,Rick James,Marvin Gaye,El Debarge, Barry WHite Lionel RIchie,Isleys EWF,Lady T.,Kid creole and coconuts,the crusaders,kc sunshine band,bee gees,jW,sd,NE,JB

Miami Heat, New York Yankees,buffalo bills

  

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Black N Proud
Member since May 06th 2006
2510 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 01:23 AM

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3. "Did you know the minute you heard Deep Cover...."
In response to Reply # 2


          

That Hip Hop was about to change with the album that would follow? Like you could you just already tell something epic was about to go down?


Great feedback though. Always insighful post, Maxxx.

  

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mistermaxxx08
Member since Dec 31st 2010
16076 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 01:31 AM

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5. "oh no doubt i was at a house party and folks was like check out "
In response to Reply # 3


          

this cat named Snoop and that nasal sound which was working the crowd.

yeah it felt fresh and remember when i said how dre had to feel kinda old after the way Ice cube up and left and carved out his thing, and though dre hit with that last NWA album he didn't have no what i call new fire on those tracks, they moved in name alot, but when he got Snoop he got not only his Power back@Michael Jordan in space jam

but also he bought himself a new idenity and kept it moving.

he bought him a road to survive for a decade with that situation.

i remember it all like yesterday. a fun time back then and we rocked so hard.

mistermaxxx R.Kelly, Michael Jackson,Stevie wonder,Rick James,Marvin Gaye,El Debarge, Barry WHite Lionel RIchie,Isleys EWF,Lady T.,Kid creole and coconuts,the crusaders,kc sunshine band,bee gees,jW,sd,NE,JB

Miami Heat, New York Yankees,buffalo bills

  

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Black N Proud
Member since May 06th 2006
2510 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 01:55 AM

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7. "RE: oh no doubt i was at a house party and folks was like check out "
In response to Reply # 5


          

>this cat named Snoop and that nasal sound which was working
>the crowd.
>
>yeah it felt fresh and remember when i said how dre had to
>feel kinda old after the way Ice cube up and left and carved
>out his thing, and though dre hit with that last NWA album he
>didn't have no what i call new fire on those tracks, they
>moved in name alot, but when he got Snoop he got not only his
>Power back@Michael Jordan in space jam
>
>but also he bought himself a new idenity and kept it moving.
>
>he bought him a road to survive for a decade with that
>situation.
>
>i remember it all like yesterday. a fun time back then and we
>rocked so hard.

Wow, I can only imagine, especially given how music specfically Hip Hop is now. Its so different now and there's nothing new and creative or groundbreaking coming out.

I think its interesting how you said Cube one upped Dre but then Dre flipped the coin and one upped Cube with The Chronic. Because as much as I think the Niggaz4Life album is something else, I'd have to agree it was business as usual with that album especially with no Cube, they had the masses so the goal was just to keep it moving.

I can imagine only how it was to hear Snoop flowing so effortlessly the first time with the coldest/smoothest flow known to Hip Hop! The brother is just too cool.

  

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mistermaxxx08
Member since Dec 31st 2010
16076 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 02:32 AM

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12. "oh Man back then Cube was on the Pulse"
In response to Reply # 7


          

he was like a rappers version of Stevie wonder folks were quoating every and anything he dropped and he went there.

but the thing with Cube was while he was a talented Artist and Charismatic on the Mic he didn't have that kind of Awe and cross over laid down vibe that Snoop had and then Suge Knight put it all together with getting a version of both of them into one in 2Pac

but that is a different thread, but that is how much things went from after Cube left NWA til Death Row was running thangs.

Snoop though had that soul in his voice which it didn't matter if he wrote anything or not because he was so soulful and he knew he had that "IT" nobody else sounded like him then or now when you think about it.he sounded like a soul singer who happen to rap.

mistermaxxx R.Kelly, Michael Jackson,Stevie wonder,Rick James,Marvin Gaye,El Debarge, Barry WHite Lionel RIchie,Isleys EWF,Lady T.,Kid creole and coconuts,the crusaders,kc sunshine band,bee gees,jW,sd,NE,JB

Miami Heat, New York Yankees,buffalo bills

  

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Black N Proud
Member since May 06th 2006
2510 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 02:47 AM

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14. "Very interesting post, especially the part on Pac. Great points."
In response to Reply # 12


          

And yeah, Snoop is very much like a singer in a way. His voice is one of a kind.

  

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mistermaxxx08
Member since Dec 31st 2010
16076 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 03:30 AM

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16. "it doesn't get talked about in that way or content, however"
In response to Reply # 14


          

you can see a trajectory where you go from Cube breaking solo to the arrival of a 2pac and in a 6 year period where things change and back then talk about things turning and quickly?

tunlike now you can drag a career out for 5 years back then you better had brought it or be done quickly.

you notice how Cube joined up with West side Connection ride? he wanted to get that hood edge back because he had gotten formulated and predictable by the end of 93 and he was already showing signs of being played out.

Snoop was on the pulse, problem with snoop he didn't have that aura that Pac had. and Suge wanted to create his own Pt Barnum and he did for a while.

mistermaxxx R.Kelly, Michael Jackson,Stevie wonder,Rick James,Marvin Gaye,El Debarge, Barry WHite Lionel RIchie,Isleys EWF,Lady T.,Kid creole and coconuts,the crusaders,kc sunshine band,bee gees,jW,sd,NE,JB

Miami Heat, New York Yankees,buffalo bills

  

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Black N Proud
Member since May 06th 2006
2510 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 03:51 AM

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18. "It really is interesting at how things have changed drastically."
In response to Reply # 16


          

As you said, back in the day if an artist showed any signs of being tired they'd better hurry up and bring it or else just get left behind.

Where nowadays an artist can seem to linger and hang around even after their few minutes of fame is up.

  

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mistermaxxx08
Member since Dec 31st 2010
16076 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 04:27 AM

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19. "hip hop especially because it wasn't that long ago you got old"
In response to Reply # 18


          

very quickly. don't let what you see with snoop, jay z, nas, ll cool j, scarface,the roots, dj quik,ice cube, will smith, fool you because acts are lucky to put out 3-4 albums and a 5 year run tops or less and be done. back in the day the audience was like next if you didn't have the goods.

the 90's era was just like the 80's until pac and biggie died and then things slowed down after that.


mistermaxxx R.Kelly, Michael Jackson,Stevie wonder,Rick James,Marvin Gaye,El Debarge, Barry WHite Lionel RIchie,Isleys EWF,Lady T.,Kid creole and coconuts,the crusaders,kc sunshine band,bee gees,jW,sd,NE,JB

Miami Heat, New York Yankees,buffalo bills

  

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Thanes1975
Member since Aug 03rd 2011
1618 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 08:59 AM

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21. "RE: Did you know the minute you heard Deep Cover...."
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

I agree. I'm in North Caolina and was in high school. I remember thinking one of the best LP's ever was about to drop after hearing Deep Cover, G-Thang and Let me Ride. I was right. Legendary LP & impact on the culture.

  

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Ron
Member since Dec 29th 2008
207 posts
Sun Sep-25-11 06:09 PM

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58. "RE: oh man the deep cover song had dropped and the hype was on"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

I remember one of my homeys recorded Rap City the day it premiered and bought the tape to my house. Me, him and one of my other patna's rewound and rewatched that video at least 20 times in a row.

  

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Luke Cage
Member since Dec 14th 2005
3047 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 01:43 AM

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6. "A lot of people were doubting Dre"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Deep Cover dropped and a lot of people were curious for more Snoop but a lot of people were looking at Dre like can you do this without Cube, Eazy and NWA and with this new crew of dudes from Long Beach?? Who the fuck is from Long Beach? Deep Cover had people interested but no one knew the Chronic would be the pop crossover monster that it was. He was in a lot of trouble with the law and quite a few people were still salty towards him for beating up Dee Barnes. G Thang hit and then I remember a bunch of people at the swapmeet bumping different songs on the album and it was like wow...Dre has outdone himself.

  

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Black N Proud
Member since May 06th 2006
2510 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 02:07 AM

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10. "I was interested in hearing about the doubters too."
In response to Reply # 6


          

I can imagine after his success with Ruthless and then leaving, would leave people thinking could he go on his way and be successful without Ruthless.

  

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mistermaxxx08
Member since Dec 31st 2010
16076 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 02:39 AM

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13. "he was doubted because NWA was a Brand"
In response to Reply # 10


          

i mean his idenity was there and the word was he can't do much without Eazy E.

Dre was the dude who watched everybpdy else and then threw his spin on things that would be his genius and he waited to see what stuck and what didn't.

he obviously watched Shock G and Digital Underground there nod to Parliament Funkadelic and also Cypress Hill and there nod to the Green Leaf and he combined those two elements which were happening on the west coast and then he took a cue from the world of R&B and smoothed his sound out.

he had a RUn DMC type of attack in the delievery but yet slowed down.

he was channeling alot of folks and then worked that stew as one.


of course 70's samples was still a fresh idea and concept and it worked like a charm.

he was doubted for being seen as a cat that while talented, that was a satisfied as a Hired hand under whomever was calling the shots.

from Eazy E to Suge Knight.

but he was motivated to get up from under eazy and yet he came to sorta regret that because Suge was a far more worse tyrant, but they worked and created history but at a huge price.

mistermaxxx R.Kelly, Michael Jackson,Stevie wonder,Rick James,Marvin Gaye,El Debarge, Barry WHite Lionel RIchie,Isleys EWF,Lady T.,Kid creole and coconuts,the crusaders,kc sunshine band,bee gees,jW,sd,NE,JB

Miami Heat, New York Yankees,buffalo bills

  

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Black N Proud
Member since May 06th 2006
2510 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 02:57 AM

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15. "RE: he was doubted because NWA was a Brand"
In response to Reply # 13


          

>i mean his idenity was there and the word was he can't do
>much without Eazy E.
>
>Dre was the dude who watched everybpdy else and then threw his
>spin on things that would be his genius and he waited to see
>what stuck and what didn't.
>
>he obviously watched Shock G and Digital Underground there nod
>to Parliament Funkadelic and also Cypress Hill and there nod
>to the Green Leaf and he combined those two elements which
>were happening on the west coast and then he took a cue from
>the world of R&B and smoothed his sound out.
>
>he had a RUn DMC type of attack in the delievery but yet
>slowed down.
>
>he was channeling alot of folks and then worked that stew as
>one.
>
>
>of course 70's samples was still a fresh idea and concept and
>it worked like a charm.
>
>he was doubted for being seen as a cat that while talented,
>that was a satisfied as a Hired hand under whomever was
>calling the shots.
>
>from Eazy E to Suge Knight.
>
>but he was motivated to get up from under eazy and yet he came
>to sorta regret that because Suge was a far more worse tyrant,
>but they worked and created history but at a huge price.

Ah, I see, I see. Dre really did have a point to prove. And I continue to see the genius of Dre with his vision of great music and the timing he had on his side. Looking back and thinking of how music and the culture changed, Dre helped with that, just in the course of a year from that last N.W.A to The Chronic. Only a year between those albums and both are two different distinct eras.

  

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mistermaxxx08
Member since Dec 31st 2010
16076 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 03:32 AM

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17. "he also had time to map things out"
In response to Reply # 15


          

there wasn't nearly as many acts out and the majors and hip hop were still green and naive. i mean stickered albums and serious content was fresh.

edited version was fresh.

dre had both coasts and regions feeling him like that.

mistermaxxx R.Kelly, Michael Jackson,Stevie wonder,Rick James,Marvin Gaye,El Debarge, Barry WHite Lionel RIchie,Isleys EWF,Lady T.,Kid creole and coconuts,the crusaders,kc sunshine band,bee gees,jW,sd,NE,JB

Miami Heat, New York Yankees,buffalo bills

  

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Black N Proud
Member since May 06th 2006
2510 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 12:11 PM

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26. "It really is interesting when you look back at it. "
In response to Reply # 17


          

And to see just how much has change. Hip Hop seemed to be at one of if not the most exciting point ever around this time.

  

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mistermaxxx08
Member since Dec 31st 2010
16076 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 10:10 PM

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48. "it wasn't nearly as corperated as it is now"
In response to Reply # 26


          

and back then the white executives didn't know how to control the Brothers and it was wildin 101.

a different time fo sho and alot of trial and error, but the music was on point and cats still had there own idenity.that in itself is a lost art.

today Drake is seen as a standard back in 92 he was PRince Be and He would be PM Dawn level with his sound and styling shows you the mind set has changed as well. not dissing him, because i liked some of PM Dawn and whatnot, but to show the contrast and difference.

mistermaxxx R.Kelly, Michael Jackson,Stevie wonder,Rick James,Marvin Gaye,El Debarge, Barry WHite Lionel RIchie,Isleys EWF,Lady T.,Kid creole and coconuts,the crusaders,kc sunshine band,bee gees,jW,sd,NE,JB

Miami Heat, New York Yankees,buffalo bills

  

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denny
Member since Apr 11th 2008
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Sat Sep-24-11 01:57 AM

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8. "I can only speak personally....."
In response to Reply # 0


          

but in my world....Dre was kinda passe at that time which was foolish in retrospect. But hip hop had a lotta new sounds and even the backwords titled album wasn't really a big thing for me other than seeing it hit #1.

Foolishly, I had kinda written Dre off cause my appreciation for him had peaked around 4 or 5 years earlier. There was alot of other stuff within that time period in hip hop going other ways.

My first impressions was that some of the songs sounded like Parliament remakes but sounding more flat. "Nothing but a G thing" great on first listen though. But it always sounded good in souped-up car stereos. In retrospect...the reason that album is so important is cause of the sound. Our 2nd generation cassette tapes in cheesy little home stereo units was not gonna show what made it special.

That album expanded the frequency range of not only the final mix....but each instrument itself. The bass drum had presence....the snare drum had body.....Almost ALL hip hop of that time had very contained frequency ranges for each instrument/drum part. Mostly due to all the low-pass, high-pass and shelf eqs. A necessity when picking apart samples and also for a general aesthetic that became popular.

Dre's 'Chronic' was the first hip hop album to break-through that aesthetic. Opened hip hop to the audiophile crowd. No dusty grooves...no sax samples played back only above 2000K so the accompanying bassline can't be heard. No transient hats over the 'real' hat cause they happen to fit and they accompany the string sample.

Pure, clean, full range sound. No accidents. Everything deliberate without the incidental genuis of sample-based hip hop.

  

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_Torchbaras
Member since Jun 03rd 2011
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Sat Sep-24-11 06:28 AM

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20. "Good point, great read..."
In response to Reply # 8


          

>That album expanded the frequency range of not only the final
>mix....but each instrument itself. The bass drum had
>presence....the snare drum had body.....Almost ALL hip hop of
>that time had very contained frequency ranges for each
>instrument/drum part. Mostly due to all the low-pass,
>high-pass and shelf eqs. A necessity when picking apart
>samples and also for a general aesthetic that became popular.
>
>Dre's 'Chronic' was the first hip hop album to break-through
>that aesthetic. Opened hip hop to the audiophile crowd. No
>dusty grooves...no sax samples played back only above 2000K so
>the accompanying bassline can't be heard. No transient hats
>over the 'real' hat cause they happen to fit and they
>accompany the string sample.
>
>Pure, clean, full range sound. No accidents. Everything
>deliberate without the incidental genuis of sample-based hip
>hop.

As a beatmaker constantly balancin between dusty and clean to find the perfect mix, this certainly made me think...

  

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howardlloyd
Member since Jan 18th 2007
2669 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 01:36 PM

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34. "i'd argue"
In response to Reply # 8


  

          

Low End Theory brought hip hop into the audiophile world

a year earlier!

  

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forgivenphoenix
Member since Dec 08th 2007
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Sun Sep-25-11 07:46 PM

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62. "There's some truth to this."
In response to Reply # 34


  

          

not to jack the post, but I remember somewhere in an interview Tip dropped that Dre was somewhat influenced by The Low End Theory when he made The Chronic. Probably more by the overall 'sound' of the album fitting what people would identify with jazz and the attention paid to the technical aspect of the sound coming thru the speakers.

The Chronic was an R&B Rap album aesthetically in that the sound quality was so smooth and clean and the cleanness was a positive trait to have by the aims of the album. I can't really remember an album having sound quality that clean like the poster above mentioned.

__________________________________________

http://www.twitter.com/chriscjamison/

People who don't take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year. People who do take risks generally make about two big mistakes a year.

Peter Drucker

  

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mrhood75
Member since Dec 06th 2004
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Sat Sep-24-11 02:06 AM

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9. "People knew it was going to be pretty big"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

"Nuthin' But a G Thing" was absolutely HUGE. It was all over the radio and all over TV, especially the Box and Yo! MTV Raps. Plus, when people heard "Deep Cover" a few months before, there was the general feeling he was going to be something special. Plus, you had the whole "Dre leaving NWA to go solo" thing going on, and the last person to leave that crew was one of the biggest rappers in the game at the time. And even back then Dre's production was seen as the power driving the NWA engine, especially post-Ice Cube.

I remember the day I bought that tape. It was after Mid-Terms Finals senior year of High School. After taking my second final of the day I drove to Leopold's in Berkeley to cop the tape. Walking back to my parking place, it seemed like every car that passed by was blasting the Snoop intro to the album.

-----------------

www.albumism.com

Checkin' Our Style, Return To Zero:

https://www.mixcloud.com/returntozero/

  

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Black N Proud
Member since May 06th 2006
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Sat Sep-24-11 02:25 AM

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11. "Great story and post. Thanks"
In response to Reply # 9


          

  

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maro
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Mon Sep-26-11 10:57 AM

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70. "RE: People knew it was going to be pretty big"
In response to Reply # 9


          

>"Nuthin' But a G Thing" was absolutely HUGE. It was all over
>the radio and all over TV, especially the Box and Yo! MTV
>Raps.

Pretty sure I saw the video first. BLOW AWAY. This was the feel good song of 92-93. I was a junior in high school and every 5.0 with a system had this bumpin





lurkin since 1999. werd.

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
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Sat Sep-24-11 10:00 AM

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22. "1992 was a different time"
In response to Reply # 0
Sat Sep-24-11 10:03 AM by bentagain

  

          

Hip-Hop was still a whole. There wasn't any division between coasts or sounds. If you're shit got released and made it to radio and TV, we bought it.

"What was the hype like then?"

The M.O. back then was release a single, get radio play, release a video, create an image.
You could get some hype in the hip-hop mags, but most of the times it backfired to put a release date on a hyped up project if it was just going to get pushed back.
All the hype he needed was the first few secs of that vid when ol girl said "heard your new album, it's the bomb."

"What were people thinking and saying (about a Dr. Dre solo album?) especially since Dr. Dre had left Ruthless Records right after finishing up recording N.W.A's platinum Niggaz4Life album; and having Straight Outta Comtpon, Eazy Duz It, No One Can Do It Better and Michell'e's album attached to his name. Did people not even second guess that The Chronic wouldn't be a classic?"

In 1992, the people who were buying hip-hop records and/or were the first generation born into the genre were just becoming teenagers.
We didn't care about any of that shit.
We were too busy trying to get laid and being cool.
Dre had a name and an image.
NWA was HUGE, and he didn't have much of a rep on the mic, but everyone knew he was the music in that group, so he already had a fanbase for whatever he decided to do solo.
Same with Cube.
He had a rep for killin mics, so we were checking for whatever he decided to do solo as well.
It was kind of accepted that a Dre solo album would have a lot of guest appearances.
The DOC's accident and ghost writing for Dre was something that never got questioned.
It just seemed to make sense.
Dre was the Oz pulling the strings behind the curtain, so it just made sense that he was looking for a new crew.
Snoop, Rage, Dogg Pound, etc...

"Was it immediately when people heard Nuthin But a G Thang and or Let Me Ride that they knew Dre would deliver a classic album?"

It's already been mentioned that Deep Cover laid the groundwork for the Snoop/Dre combo.
That song got major play in the East.
The beat and the vibe of the song are some straight east coast staples at the time, combined with the imagery of the movie and the West coast lyrics was probably the perfect way for them to put folks on notice of what was to come.
G Thang was just a phenomena.
Everybody was bangin that jawn.
EVERYBODY.
Think about how your mama knows the words to Juicy...like that
And there was no hate, like oh that shit is wack, it's on the radio all day, etc...
It was more like people wanted to hear it more.
Like it was championing the validity of hip-hop.
Look at us, we're on Kasey Kasem radio now, etc...

"If you can remember exactly what it was like leading up too and after the release of Dr. Dre's classic album please discuss and speak on it."

Leading up too...
The world was mad, hating what NWA stood for, what they said, what they looked like...
Sheeeiiiitt, we were wearing Raiders gear because they did.
All the censorship talk, etc...just gave it more impact
I think a lot of people were scared.
On some this music is going to make our children gang band and sell drugs, which most of us were anyway, just not so blatantly.
Now that I think about, it's kind of amazing that it even got released.
I mean folks were talking about boycotting Coke or Pepsi, I can't remember, because they had Luda in an advertisement.
This was the solo record from the producer of America's most hated/feared group, and the theme was smoking weed. HAHA
After G-Thang dropped it was a rap.
He's probably still eating off of the success of that album.
I mean let's say Dre never dropped the Chronic, would he even be relevant based off of subsequent work?

---------------------------------------------------------------

If you can't understand it without an explanation

you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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mistermaxxx08
Member since Dec 31st 2010
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Sat Sep-24-11 10:35 AM

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23. "all true Co Sign"
In response to Reply # 22


          

and remember Dr Dre on that source cover with the gun to his head and as has been mentioned the whole dee barnes fallout and situation.

it was a big time gamble that paid off.

some folks might laugh and think oh no biggie with Dr.Dre And Suge doing there thing but back then it was high stakes poker.

fast forward some years later and you had Puffy getting that 75 million start up credit for Bad Boy, then Master P with No limit, then Cash Money and there deal with Universal, to X Raided doing his thing, then of course rap alot, also murder inc...,etc....


and while rutheless got the ball rolling, it was Death Row that while at first a boutique label it stayed that way only for a short time, because the music was banging no pun itended and also the artists were big time and they did it up there big.

but nobody saw things blowing up like they did and that is what made it so special.

watching those humble begginging on death row was something else. everybody eating out of 2 buckets of a KFC bucket and just winging it and making things happen.

wallmart wasn't stocking that CD back then. that is another thing to remember the sticker scared folks.

that tape/cd got played a whole lot like crazy. i don't care what nobody says because i was there as were others, that to me was the last universal Hip-Hop release that it seemed everybody was on the same vibe with and then when Snoop dropped his debut it was a wrap and to me i still say that Dre and Snoop got robbed out of making magic because they were unfadeable for a good minute.

in truth i could make another thread on that, but Dr Dre and Snoop were everything that Kayne and Jay Z will never be as MC's and also Producer to Artist. you can't create that kind of chemistry at all that is what made it a beautiful thang.

mistermaxxx R.Kelly, Michael Jackson,Stevie wonder,Rick James,Marvin Gaye,El Debarge, Barry WHite Lionel RIchie,Isleys EWF,Lady T.,Kid creole and coconuts,the crusaders,kc sunshine band,bee gees,jW,sd,NE,JB

Miami Heat, New York Yankees,buffalo bills

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
15206 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 12:27 PM

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31. "In the moment"
In response to Reply # 23


  

          

None of this shit really registered at the time

"and remember Dr Dre on that source cover with the gun to his head and as has been mentioned the whole dee barnes fallout and situation.

it was a big time gamble that paid off.

some folks might laugh and think oh no biggie with Dr.Dre And Suge doing there thing but back then it was high stakes poker.

fast forward some years later and you had Puffy getting that 75 million start up credit for Bad Boy, then Master P with No limit, then Cash Money and there deal with Universal, to X Raided doing his thing, then of course rap alot, also murder inc...,etc....


and while rutheless got the ball rolling, it was Death Row that while at first a boutique label it stayed that way only for a short time, because the music was banging no pun itended and also the artists were big time and they did it up there big."

I remember the Dee Barnes situation and the mag cover (I think it was Vibe), but like I said, I was still a youngin, chasin panties, and worried about how tight my fade was.
The inner workings of business relations wasn't really interesting to me at the time.
It's a CRAZY story now.
Youngins might think that way.
Oh Dre started a record label, what's the big deal.
But back then, Dre had the co-sign.
He had beef with Dee Barnes, then Dee Barnes was corny.
He had beef with Eazy, then Eazy was wack.
He' puttin Snoop on, then Snoop must be nice.


"wallmart wasn't stocking that CD back then. that is another thing to remember the sticker scared folks.

that tape/cd got played a whole lot like crazy. i don't care what nobody says because i was there as were others, that to me was the last universal Hip-Hop release that it seemed everybody was on the same vibe with and then when Snoop dropped his debut it was a wrap and to me i still say that Dre and Snoop got robbed out of making magic because they were unfadeable for a good minute."

Exactly.
It's crazy too that this album had such a big impact without the internet.
The stickers, censorship, Tipper Gore, C Deleores, Cop Killer, FBI surveillance etc...
How could a major budget for an album centered around smoking weed by a member of NWA?
Looking back, it doesn't seem possible.

---------------------------------------------------------------

If you can't understand it without an explanation

you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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Brew
Member since Nov 23rd 2002
20498 posts
Sun Sep-25-11 10:32 AM

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56. "Couldn't agree more."
In response to Reply # 23


          

>in truth i could make another thread on that, but Dr Dre and
>Snoop were everything that Kayne and Jay Z will never be as
>MC's and also Producer to Artist. you can't create that kind
>of chemistry at all that is what made it a beautiful thang.

You should make that thread.

----------------------------------------

"Fuck aliens." © WarriorPoet415

  

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BSharp
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9233 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 11:59 AM

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25. "What kind of hypothetical is this?"
In response to Reply # 22


  

          


>He's probably still eating off of the success of that album.
>I mean let's say Dre never dropped the Chronic, would he even
>be relevant based off of subsequent work?

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
15206 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 12:12 PM

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27. "That album catapulted him to celebrity"
In response to Reply # 25


  

          

What albums post Chronic would have had the same affect on his career?

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you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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BSharp
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Sat Sep-24-11 12:26 PM

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30. "But you're hypothetically asking:"
In response to Reply # 27


  

          

If he did not have his identity as an artist, would he eventually gain that identity otherwise?

It's like asking
"If Iron Man hadn't been made, would Iron Man 2 have ever been as relevant?"
"If Kelly Clarkson wasn't on American Idol, would she have been known to tens of millions of people by the time she dropped her debut single?"
"If Michael Jordan had played for a team other than the Bulls, could the Bulls possibly have won six championships?"

Pure nonsense.

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
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Sat Sep-24-11 12:39 PM

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32. "No, what I'm saying is"
In response to Reply # 30
Sat Sep-24-11 12:43 PM by bentagain

  

          

everything post Chronic was an attempt to capture that success

and he never did

the endorsements he's getting now, the cars, the headphones, etc...they go to him because he was Dre from the Chronic

sheeiitt, cats like Em and 50 got co-signs from Dre
not because he's the Dre that's been working on Detox for decades, but because he's the Dre that made the Chronic.
he's the Dre that made Snoop.

Would you agree that on a quality level, his post Chronic releases have been meh?
I'm saying the reason those meh projects were even successful is because he's the Dre that made the Chronic.

Here's an analogy;

Brett Favre
He's won one ring
One
And yet NFL teams keep signing this cat, hoping to capture that success.
If he doesn't win a chip with the Pac, he goes down as a reckless QB who would lose you a game just as easily as he could win it for you.
The chip validates his status as one of the GOATS

What would his legacy be if his first solo release was 2001
He'd be Goldie Loc from the Eastsidaz.

Why are cats still waiting for Detox?
Because he's the Dre that made the Chronic.

---------------------------------------------------------------

If you can't understand it without an explanation

you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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BSharp
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Sat Sep-24-11 01:10 PM

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33. "One could easily make an argument that..."
In response to Reply # 32


  

          

..."2001" was more successful than "The Chronic." It probably sold twice as much worldwide, it was released on Dr. Dre's own imprint, and it wasn't as dependent on derivative interpolations and samples of hit records.

I feel like culturally, "The Chronic" was more important. Business wise, I think "2001" was far more successful. Additionally, Dr. Dre brought his career back to life with "2001," following the modest (at best) performance of his work of the few/several years prior to its release. "The Chronic" came out relatively soon after "Efil4Zaggin."

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
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Sat Sep-24-11 01:48 PM

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35. "Well that is kind of the argument I'm tryin to make"
In response to Reply # 33
Sat Sep-24-11 02:11 PM by bentagain

  

          

"..."2001" was more successful than "The Chronic." It probably sold twice as much worldwide, it was released on Dr. Dre's own imprint, and it wasn't as dependent on derivative interpolations and samples of hit records."

and without the Chronic this doesn't happen

"I feel like culturally, "The Chronic" was more important."

exactly. and to go further, nothing else he did comes close

"Business wise, I think "2001" was far more successful."

you can miss me with business talk, cuz i could care less

"Additionally, Dr. Dre brought his career back to life with "2001," following the modest (at best) performance of his work of the few/several years prior to its release."

which is what i said about his post Chronic releases being meh

Think Nas tryin to recapture Illmatic

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you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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BSharp
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Sat Sep-24-11 02:47 PM

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39. "The Nas/"Illmatic" comparison is moot with Dr. Dre"
In response to Reply # 35


  

          

Dr. Dre was easily already one of the most successful producers in the history of hip hop by the time "The Chronic" came out. His career had already spanned almost a decade, which was extraordinary in those days.

"Illmatic" was Nas's debut album.



.....


Bottom line, for you to ask if Dr. Dre's career could possibly be the same without "The Chronic"... NO, of course it couldn't or wouldn't be the same. It's the most simplistic and obvious question you could've possibly asked, and you could say the same thing about his career and "Straight Outta Compton"... or "2001."

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
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Sat Sep-24-11 04:31 PM

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42. "No shit"
In response to Reply # 39


  

          

I tried to explain it to you

I feel like you're getting caught up on specifics and not seeing the big picture

Illmatic was Nas' debut...no shit

I'm sayin, without Illmatic, what's his impact on hip-hop, a handful of not quite as good albums, which probably sold more than Illmatic, were probably more successful business wise (whatever that means), but were never close to the impact that Illmatic had

but you'll probably look up record sales and try to argue what I just said

KIM

---------------------------------------------------------------

If you can't understand it without an explanation

you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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BSharp
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Sun Sep-25-11 01:04 AM

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53. "lol"
In response to Reply # 42


  

          

Just don't ask stupid hypothetical questions, and try not to think too hard in terms of 'relevance', and you'll be alright.

  

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Black N Proud
Member since May 06th 2006
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Sat Sep-24-11 12:16 PM

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28. "Great read, thanks!"
In response to Reply # 22


          

  

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Luke Cage
Member since Dec 14th 2005
3047 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 02:33 PM

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38. "That's some serious revisionist history"
In response to Reply # 22


  

          

>Hip-Hop was still a whole. There wasn't any division between
>coasts or sounds. If you're shit got released and made it to
>radio and TV, we bought it.

No division between coasts or sounds? Are you serious? Cypress Hill got some play and so did Cube but in general the Chronic the first West Coast album to break through and get radio play and overall acceptance on the East Coast. Hip Hop was all about NYC..they ran shit and everyone else was hoping to get their approval or support with very little success. The Chronic came out less than a year after Tim Dog dropped Fuck Compton and the East was loving that wack ass shit. The Midwest didn't exist, the South was barely a blip on the radar screen...hell even Philly's Hip Hop scene was dead in 92. The whole East vs West, Bad Boy vs Death Row, Pac vs Biggie shit didn't just pop up and happen in 95...a lot had happened to build up to that point. Hip Hop is much less divided today than it was in 92.

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
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Sat Sep-24-11 04:19 PM

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41. "revisionist history or not, i can only speak from my perspective"
In response to Reply # 38
Sat Sep-24-11 04:36 PM by bentagain

  

          

we (we meaning the group of friends i grew up with)

we bought: mc eight, compton's most wanted, too short, 2pac, king t, the alcaholics, del, souls of mischief, the pharcyde, mc breed, ice cube, the lynch mob, ice t, cypress hill, def jef, hammer, dj quik, sir mix a lot, saafir, kam, spice 1, the coup

we bought everything

"the Chronic the first West Coast album to break through and get radio play and overall acceptance on the East Coast"

are you saying that NWA didn't get any play on the east coast?

because i could tell you a story about riding around in a stolen car with 100 miles and runnin in the deck

the division i'm speaking of is from a consumer's perspective.

you want to speak on the business side, speak on it

you want to detail some beef, go for it

i can only speak for myself

---------------------------------------------------------------

If you can't understand it without an explanation

you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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Luke Cage
Member since Dec 14th 2005
3047 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 06:23 PM

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43. "I'm merely correcting your statement about Hip Hop's lack of coastal iss..."
In response to Reply # 41


  

          

>we (we meaning the group of friends i grew up with)
>
>we bought: mc eight, compton's most wanted, too short, 2pac,
>king t, the alcaholics, del, souls of mischief, the pharcyde,
>mc breed, ice cube, the lynch mob, ice t, cypress hill, def
>jef, hammer, dj quik, sir mix a lot, saafir, kam, spice 1, the
>coup
>
>we bought everything

That's great that you and your crew were that open minded and bought everything but that just wasn't the general consensus. From print, radio, shows booked etc it was a very New York centered Hip Hop world back then. That doesn't mean that every single person on the East Coast didn't listen to any West Coast but to act as if the lines of division weren't there is just inaccurate.
>
>"the Chronic the first West Coast album to break through and
>get radio play and overall acceptance on the East Coast"
>
>are you saying that NWA didn't get any play on the east
>coast?
>
>because i could tell you a story about riding around in a
>stolen car with 100 miles and runnin in the deck

A few kids liking an album does not equal Hip Hop unification during those times. That's just not the case. NWA in general got no radio play back then and certainly didn't get the type of attention on the East Coast that they did in the West or South. It was extremely rare back then for a Hip Hop group from the West to even play venues in NY.
>
>the division i'm speaking of is from a consumer's perspective.
>
>
>you want to speak on the business side, speak on it
>
>you want to detail some beef, go for it
>
>i can only speak for myself
>
>

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
15206 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 07:09 PM

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45. "So you think all those acts I named get deals"
In response to Reply # 43


  

          

"From print, radio, shows booked etc it was a very New York centered Hip Hop world back then.That doesn't mean that every single person on the East Coast didn't listen to any West Coast but to act as if the lines of division weren't there is just inaccurate."

I feel like you bought that East/West bullshit.

I'm speaking from a consumer's perspective

Do you think all those acts I named get deals, videos, etc...if they aren't going to sell any records in half the country?

Take the Geto Boyz for example

When my minds playin tricks broke, nobody was like, oh wait a minute, these boyz aren't from around here, they might be from that other coast, let's not buy their stuff

HELL NO. That shit was dope, and that's all it had to be

My bol had a DJ Magic Mike tape, i can still hear the

Bing, bing, bing, bing, bing, bing, Bass, Bass

"A few kids liking an album does not equal Hip Hop unification during those times. That's just not the case. NWA in general got no radio play back then and certainly didn't get the type of attention on the East Coast that they did in the West or South. It was extremely rare back then for a Hip Hop group from the West to even play venues in NY."

And I'm telling you you're wrong.

NWA DID get play out here.

I can't speak on what the West and the South was playing to compare so I'm not going to get into a pissing contest with about who gave them more attention.

I still remember this girl gettin dissed because everytime she came around my bol would start singin...I got a fat girl on my jock

Everybody was rocking Raiders gear.

Don't even get me started on 2 Live Crew

As far as getting booked at venues, media, and print etc...there was a stigma over the entire genre

Folks thought going to a hip-hop show was like going to Vietnam

Couple that with the imagery of west coast videos, and I think it might be easy to infer the reason why a club owner might be hesitant to book them

You act like acts other than RUN DMC were getting booked for arena shows

Hip-hop shows were done in hole in the wall clubs, and an act flyin out to the east from the west would definitely be losing money

---------------------------------------------------------------

If you can't understand it without an explanation

you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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Luke Cage
Member since Dec 14th 2005
3047 posts
Sun Sep-25-11 12:01 AM

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50. "You actually think most artists sell everywhere?"
In response to Reply # 45


  

          

>I feel like you bought that East/West bullshit.
>
>I'm speaking from a consumer's perspective
>
>Do you think all those acts I named get deals, videos,
>etc...if they aren't going to sell any records in half the
>country?

Selling records to half of the country would be a dream for any record label. That's millions of people! That's the majority of the damn country. NY bias was very real so it's not about buying East vs West bullshit. Hip Hop started in NY and they were very protective of it for a long time. You actually think Compton's most wanted sold a lot of records East of the Mississippi? Those artists didn't need to because there are plenty of people out West in the Midwest and in the South to support those artists. The same is true in reverse nowadays. You weren't about to hear Mobb Deep or Jeru down South. You think every artist that gets signed to a deal sells everywhere? All artists have markets they do well in and markets that they don't do well in...that doesn't mean they can't have a career.
>
>Take the Geto Boyz for example
>
>When my minds playin tricks broke, nobody was like, oh wait a
>minute, these boyz aren't from around here, they might be from
>that other coast, let's not buy their stuff

You do realize that the song you are using as an example was from their FOURTH album. You want to honestly argue that "Read These Nikes" and "Mind Of A Lunatic" were getting major attention in New York back then? Mind Playing Tricks was a hit song that crossed over and got played everywhere eventually but all you need to do to realize the point I'm making is actually listen to early Geto Boy records like Do It Like It G.O. where they are complaining about the lack of respect and play they get on the East Coast.

>HELL NO. That shit was dope, and that's all it had to be
>
>My bol had a DJ Magic Mike tape, i can still hear the
>
>Bing, bing, bing, bing, bing, bing, Bass, Bass
>
>"A few kids liking an album does not equal Hip Hop unification
>during those times. That's just not the case. NWA in general
>got no radio play back then and certainly didn't get the type
>of attention on the East Coast that they did in the West or
>South. It was extremely rare back then for a Hip Hop group
>from the West to even play venues in NY."
>
>And I'm telling you you're wrong.
>
>NWA DID get play out here.
>
>I can't speak on what the West and the South was playing to
>compare so I'm not going to get into a pissing contest with
>about who gave them more attention.
>
>I still remember this girl gettin dissed because everytime she
>came around my bol would start singin...I got a fat girl on my
>jock
>
>Everybody was rocking Raiders gear.
>
>Don't even get me started on 2 Live Crew
>
>As far as getting booked at venues, media, and print
>etc...there was a stigma over the entire genre
>
>Folks thought going to a hip-hop show was like going to
>Vietnam
>
>Couple that with the imagery of west coast videos, and I think
>it might be easy to infer the reason why a club owner might be
>hesitant to book them
>
>You act like acts other than RUN DMC were getting booked for
>arena shows

Whodini, Kurtis Blow, The Fat Boys, Beastie Boys, DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince, Beastie Boys, LL Cool J, PE, Fresh Fest...I could on and on. Plenty of Hip Hop acts played big venues.
>
>Hip-hop shows were done in hole in the wall clubs, and an act
>flyin out to the east from the west would definitely be losing
>money

Lose money? By 1992? Come on man. Look I'm not talking about all of the hype about East or West but the reality is in general NY Radio, press, etc were not fucking with West Coast or Southern artists back then. There was not this unified Hip Hop nation where region didn't matter. Of course their are always going to be pockets of people who go against that and eventually those barriers came down but don't act as if they weren't there. Shit New York used to give shit to Philly and even other areas of New York like Long Island so they certainly weren't fucking with people they perceived to be country and rocking jeri curls especially when they were coming with what was seen as negative records back then when most NY artists were promoting unity and some sense of Black pride. NWA, Geto Boys, Too Short, were perceived as taking Hip Hop back lyrically and socially. Tim Dog's only hit was Fuck Compton a song basically dissing the entire West Coast. There's a reason for that...he wasn't alone in how he felt. The shit came up all the time at the New Music Seminar, in interviews and magazines. You ask any Southern or West Coast artist who was around then about how hard it was to break into that NY East Coast fan base and they will tell you. Quik, Cube, Dre, Too Short, Scarface will all tell you how hard it was back then.
>
>

  

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BigReg
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Mon Sep-26-11 08:03 AM

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67. "Yeah and no"
In response to Reply # 50


  

          

You make it seem that the second an artist was found out to be originally from outside of the East Coast it was the death knell. NYC had a very specific ethos that if you didn't follow they weren't really feeling you, but more then a few regional acts got played who had more 'universal' sounds, from DOC to Pharcyde.

>Shit New York used to give shit to Philly and
>even other areas of New York like Long Island so they
>certainly weren't fucking with people they perceived to be
>country and rocking jeri curls especially when they were
>coming with what was seen as negative records back then when
>most NY artists were promoting unity and some sense of Black
>pride. NWA, Geto Boys, Too Short, were perceived as taking Hip
>Hop back lyrically and socially. Tim Dog's only hit was Fuck
>Compton a song basically dissing the entire West Coast.

Depends on the time to. In the mid to late 80's I would agree with you, but with the early 90's there was a def. shift in that perception simply because hip-hop was becoming to big at a large rate. It's a bit hard for a Bronx MC to hate on a Long Island one if they are continually playing the same venues.

You have a point that it was hard for a 'pure' West Coast artist to break, like you said, it's a bit hard for someone who could barely stomach the D.A.I.S.Y. age to suddenly accept Too Short. But it wasn't a bias based on region however, just on sound. The acts that were able to stay West Coast but appeal to the East aesthetic did well(Deep Cover , Ice Cube's hardcore rapping w jeri curls and all). Tim Dog wasn't that big of a hit on NYC radio at all, I won't say it never got play, but compared to anything Cypress Hill dropped or even other classic NYC diss records? Not even close. You make it look like there was this active anti-west movement when there was anything but; dudes just felt what they felt and didn't want to get out of their lane -=SONICALLY=-. Its why a fraud mc like Boss could do well.

  

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maro
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Mon Sep-26-11 11:09 AM

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71. "RE: Yeah and no"
In response to Reply # 67


          

>You make it seem that the second an artist was found out to
>be originally from outside of the East Coast it was the death
>knell. NYC had a very specific ethos that if you didn't
>follow they weren't really feeling you, but more then a few
>regional acts got played who had more 'universal' sounds, from
>DOC to Pharcyde.
>

I'm born and raised in philly and have been listening to hip hop since the early 80's. I was a junior in high school when the chronic came out, and I can tell you that up until that point, the only west coast shit we had memorized and in the decks was NWA Niggaz4Life. we all knew of and had heard classic's from too short, quick, shit, even del (mr dobolina), but none of us were really bumpin that shit in our rides.... until the chronic. That definitely opened some doors as too... what the fuck is going on out there?


lurkin since 1999. werd.

  

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Luke Cage
Member since Dec 14th 2005
3047 posts
Tue Sep-27-11 12:34 AM

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76. "In the early days absolutely"
In response to Reply # 67


  

          

>You make it seem that the second an artist was found out to
>be originally from outside of the East Coast it was the death
>knell. NYC had a very specific ethos that if you didn't
>follow they weren't really feeling you, but more then a few
>regional acts got played who had more 'universal' sounds, from
>DOC to Pharcyde.

If you weren't from NYC you got shitted on. Of course a lot of it had to do with the sound but plenty of Philly acts had an east coast sound but still couldn't get any respect. I remember reading about one of PE's early shows and how Melle Mel was in the crowd booing the shit out of them because they were from Long Island.

>
>>Shit New York used to give shit to Philly and
>>even other areas of New York like Long Island so they
>>certainly weren't fucking with people they perceived to be
>>country and rocking jeri curls especially when they were
>>coming with what was seen as negative records back then when
>>most NY artists were promoting unity and some sense of Black
>>pride. NWA, Geto Boys, Too Short, were perceived as taking
>Hip
>>Hop back lyrically and socially. Tim Dog's only hit was Fuck
>>Compton a song basically dissing the entire West Coast.
>
>Depends on the time to. In the mid to late 80's I would agree
>with you, but with the early 90's there was a def. shift in
>that perception simply because hip-hop was becoming to big at
>a large rate. It's a bit hard for a Bronx MC to hate on a
>Long Island one if they are continually playing the same
>venues.

Right that was my point that The Chronic was basically the first West Coast album to bust through big time on the east. That was the early 90's and things were changing and the Chronic was that big record that kicked the door in.
>
>You have a point that it was hard for a 'pure' West Coast
>artist to break, like you said, it's a bit hard for someone
>who could barely stomach the D.A.I.S.Y. age to suddenly accept
>Too Short. But it wasn't a bias based on region however, just
>on sound. The acts that were able to stay West Coast but
>appeal to the East aesthetic did well(Deep Cover , Ice Cube's
>hardcore rapping w jeri curls and all). Tim Dog wasn't that
>big of a hit on NYC radio at all, I won't say it never got
>play, but compared to anything Cypress Hill dropped or even
>other classic NYC diss records? Not even close. You make it
>look like there was this active anti-west movement when there
>was anything but; dudes just felt what they felt and didn't
>want to get out of their lane -=SONICALLY=-. Its why a fraud
>mc like Boss could do well.

Tim Dog's record was incredibly wack but it still sold relatively well and a big reason for that was that their was a good amount of hardcore old school NYC heads who were glad that someone was standing up and saying that the West was wack. It didn't last because Tim was utterly unlistenable but the sentiment was still there around 91 and early 92.

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
15206 posts
Tue Sep-27-11 08:27 AM

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77. "I feel like you're taking bits and pieces from different eras"
In response to Reply # 76


  

          

to make your point

"If you weren't from NYC you got shitted on. Of course a lot of it had to do with the sound but plenty of Philly acts had an east coast sound but still couldn't get any respect. I remember reading about one of PE's early shows and how Melle Mel was in the crowd booing the shit out of them because they were from Long Island."

we're talking about 91'-92. and the same to your comments about arena shows. fresh fest started in 84'?, and all the artists you listed were on some reincarnation of that tour with RUN DMC headlining

and when you think about it logically, with hip-hop being born in NYC, and coming to the public's attention in the early 80's, it was going to take time for the culture to spread to the west, and it was going to take some time for the west to cultivate it's own sound, so just dismissing everything as NYC bias seems a little naive.

and I'm not from NYC, so I can't really speak on what the mindset was. I'm assuming you're from LA and/or the west which is why I'm interested in your perspective.

"Right that was my point that The Chronic was basically the first West Coast album to bust through big time on the east. That was the early 90's and things were changing and the Chronic was that big record that kicked the door in."

Hammer? Let's get it started was big in the east, sheeeiitt, we were wearing Hammer pants. And U can't touch this was out before the chronic, too legit to quit was out before the chronic too, so...

"Tim Dog's record was incredibly wack but it still sold relatively well and a big reason for that was that their was a good amount of hardcore old school NYC heads who were glad that someone was standing up and saying that the West was wack. It didn't last because Tim was utterly unlistenable but the sentiment was still there around 91 and early 92."

The Tim Dog reference is actually proving my point. He made a diss record about west coast artists because NWA and other west coast artists were winning fans in the late 80's. After NWA went platinum, record companies started signing imitations, and I think that's what might spark some resentment. This was in 91'. If the west coast artists aren't selling records in the east, would you even know who Tim Dog's wack ass is?

---------------------------------------------------------------

If you can't understand it without an explanation

you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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Luke Cage
Member since Dec 14th 2005
3047 posts
Wed Sep-28-11 12:38 AM

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81. "My point is the Chronic broke down Coastal Biases"
In response to Reply # 77


  

          


>we're talking about 91'-92. and the same to your comments
>about arena shows. fresh fest started in 84'?, and all the
>artists you listed were on some reincarnation of that tour
>with RUN DMC headlining

In 84 Hip Hop outside of NY was non existent and a joke to most New York Hip Hop heads. By 92 things were getting better by comparison and the Chronic was the main record that helped to change that.
>
>and when you think about it logically, with hip-hop being born
>in NYC, and coming to the public's attention in the early
>80's, it was going to take time for the culture to spread to
>the west, and it was going to take some time for the west to
>cultivate it's own sound, so just dismissing everything as NYC
>bias seems a little naive.

The culture was out West for a long time. It just wasn't respected. LA, The Bay, The South, etc were all viewed as country and wack and not being real Hip Hop.

>and I'm not from NYC, so I can't really speak on what the
>mindset was. I'm assuming you're from LA and/or the west which
>is why I'm interested in your perspective.

Yep I'm from LA and anyone from LA knows just how testy and territorial New Yorkers were back in the days about Hip Hop. It's not a secret. Times have changed big time but you were not about to hear CMW, Spice 1 or DJ Quik on Stretch & Bobbitto for example. It just wasn't gonna happen. If you were going to hear any gangster type shit back then you would hear Just Ice or BDP's first record. You weren't about to hear 6 in the morning.
>
>"Right that was my point that The Chronic was basically the
>first West Coast album to bust through big time on the east.
>That was the early 90's and things were changing and the
>Chronic was that big record that kicked the door in."
>
>Hammer? Let's get it started was big in the east, sheeeiitt,
>we were wearing Hammer pants. And U can't touch this was out
>before the chronic, too legit to quit was out before the
>chronic too, so...

You can't seriously be bringing up MC Hammer in a discussion about hardcore Hip Hop. Hammer was a pop rap dancer dude from Oakland who dissed Run DMC. Any self respecting New York Hip Hop head hated his ass with a passion. He was the most vilified man in Hip Hop! You have to be aware of that. Hammer big in the East? Apparently you don't remember the Turn This Mutha Out video when Hammer's homie gets off the phone to tell him "You aint' hiting in New York hammer!! what you gon doing that??".
>
>"Tim Dog's record was incredibly wack but it still sold
>relatively well and a big reason for that was that their was a
>good amount of hardcore old school NYC heads who were glad
>that someone was standing up and saying that the West was
>wack. It didn't last because Tim was utterly unlistenable but
>the sentiment was still there around 91 and early 92."
>
>The Tim Dog reference is actually proving my point. He made a
>diss record about west coast artists because NWA and other
>west coast artists were winning fans in the late 80's. After
>NWA went platinum, record companies started signing
>imitations, and I think that's what might spark some
>resentment. This was in 91'. If the west coast artists aren't
>selling records in the east, would you even know who Tim Dog's
>wack ass is?

Tim Dog sold some records and even got a deal based on his diss because he not only attacked what was hot and selling records but he went after the West and what was perceived as wrong with Hip Hop. There were several people who felt the same way he was just the one who put it out there like that. Again you didn't have to sell records in the East to go platinum back then. If you sold everywhere but NY you could still get a gold or platinum record. That was basically Too Short's entire career. Big sales in Cali, Texas, Tenn, Miss, Bama and the rest of the South. He never needed the East or radio support to sell his shit and neither did many of the West Coast artists like Spice 1 and DJ Quik.
>
>

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
15206 posts
Wed Sep-28-11 09:23 AM

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82. "I'm not from NYC"
In response to Reply # 81


  

          

the East Coast is not NYC

like I said in my original post, the MO was release a single, make a video

i have a YO MTV! raps compilation album from 89', and Life Is Too Short was on there along with Ice-T's High Roller
2 of my favorite songs on that CD actually
also Fresh Prince and Steady B had cuts on there, so that's 4 out of 11 cuts that are from acts outside of NYC

yeah, i remember the "Hammer, you ain't hittin in NY" line, FROM THE VIDEO
he was on YO, so he was getting played nationally
and there are East Coast cities that resent NY, so that probably gained him fans
and let's not act like Hammer was pop from day #1
turn this motha out was big out here
we're all in the same gang, the final verses are him passing the mic to Eazy E
which reminds me

Tone Loc, wild thing, funky cold medina, big records out here
Digital Underground, the humpty dance, huge record
Young MC, bust a move, uh huh

the Chronic didn't break down that barrier, the Chronic took the #1 spot from NY
followed by Doggystyle, the West had the crown for a minute

if that was what was going on in LA, i'll have to take your word for it
but out here, everything was definitely coming out of NY, in the beginning
but by the end of the 80s, you have groups breaking nationally from every region
and from someone who is NOT from NYC, we bought it, we weren't threatened and/or hating on it
WE WERE FANS

---------------------------------------------------------------

If you can't understand it without an explanation

you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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Luke Cage
Member since Dec 14th 2005
3047 posts
Thu Sep-29-11 10:32 AM

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98. "Ok we're obviously talking about different things here"
In response to Reply # 82


  

          

>the East Coast is not NYC

I thought we were all clear that we were speaking about NYC's bias towards Hip Hop (not pop) outside of New York. No we aren't talking about Maine or Rhode Island we are talking about New York and HIP HOP.
>
>like I said in my original post, the MO was release a single,
>make a video
>
>i have a YO MTV! raps compilation album from 89', and Life Is
>Too Short was on there along with Ice-T's High Roller
>2 of my favorite songs on that CD actually
>also Fresh Prince and Steady B had cuts on there, so that's 4
>out of 11 cuts that are from acts outside of NYC

Those are compilations put together by record labels. Steady B and the Fresh Prince had NY styles so in many ways they got a bit of a pass.
>
>yeah, i remember the "Hammer, you ain't hittin in NY" line,
>FROM THE VIDEO
>he was on YO, so he was getting played nationally
>and there are East Coast cities that resent NY, so that
>probably gained him fans
>and let's not act like Hammer was pop from day #1
>turn this motha out was big out here
>we're all in the same gang, the final verses are him passing
>the mic to Eazy E
>which reminds me

Yes he was pop from the get go. He was never embraced by Hardcore NY fans of lyrics because that is completely not what he was. We're all in the same gang was to most NYC fans a bad watered down version of Self Destruction.
>
>Tone Loc, wild thing, funky cold medina, big records out here
>Digital Underground, the humpty dance, huge record
>Young MC, bust a move, uh huh

No Tone Loc and Young MC were not big with HIP HOP fans. I keep saying Hip Hop because you seem to not be clear on that. I'm not talking about people who had New Kids on the Block and Milli vanilli records to go with their Tone Loc and Vanilla Ice records. That's a different community and not what I'm talking about.
>
>the Chronic didn't break down that barrier, the Chronic took
>the #1 spot from NY
>followed by Doggystyle, the West had the crown for a minute

All you need to do is look at a playlist from any NY station that played Hip Hop on a regular basis to see what was getting played back then on your typical Hip Hop based radio station in NY.
>
>if that was what was going on in LA, i'll have to take your
>word for it
>but out here, everything was definitely coming out of NY, in
>the beginning
>but by the end of the 80s, you have groups breaking nationally
>from every region
>and from someone who is NOT from NYC, we bought it, we weren't
>threatened and/or hating on it
>WE WERE FANS

Again I am speaking about New York city. Not Baltimore or any of those other cities or states on the East Coast. NY was the mecca of Hip Hop and that's what I'm talking about. And not Vanilla Ice or MC Hammer.

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
15206 posts
Thu Sep-29-11 03:07 PM

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100. "Boyz n the Hood...1991"
In response to Reply # 98
Thu Sep-29-11 03:20 PM by bentagain

  

          

Sheeiiit, Juice came out before the Chronic, had Tupac in a featured role of a hip hop movie set IN NYC, and there were even a few West Coast acts on the soundtrack

---------------------------------------------------------------

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you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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Luke Cage
Member since Dec 14th 2005
3047 posts
Thu Sep-29-11 10:08 PM

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102. "So now you're bringing up movies?"
In response to Reply # 100


  

          

As proof that Hip Hop was all lovey dovey and there was no coastal bias back in the days? Dre has talked in several interviews about how excited he was that the Chronic was able to blow up so big in NY because West Coast albums weren't doing that. You think Ras Kass recorded a song like "Sonset" just for shits and giggles? In fact just check out any response by My SP1200 Broke Again to see how a large amount of NY Hip Hop fans felt about most West Coast Hip Hop. You can scroll down in this very email to get a taste.


  

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k_orr
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80197 posts
Wed Sep-28-11 09:41 AM

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86. "Agreed, there's a lot of revisionism here"
In response to Reply # 38


  

          

The anti-west coast bias soon started after Straight Outta Compton.

Fake gangsta this, studio gangsta that was all over the east coast. (Tribe, Main Source...prolly a few more if i were to look @ my crates)

To some extent it was anti-pop (and thankfully anti-R&B)

But 89-91 wasn't some Kum Buy Yah time in rap. There has never been a rap equilibria where everyone was invited to the part to get down.

one
k. orr

  

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CaliFornicater
Member since May 22nd 2010
582 posts
Sat Sep-24-11 11:46 AM

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24. "G Thang"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Deep cover had an impact for sure!

But when G Thang hit, it was a wrap.

I remember riding hard for Cube around this time cuz of No Vaseline.

But there was no denying Snoop and Dre's beats.

  

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araQual
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Sat Sep-24-11 12:19 PM

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29. "i never anticipated anything Dre put out: ever"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

honestly, him, The Chronic, i could give a shit about either *shrugs*

V.

---
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makaveli
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72. "RE: i never anticipated anything Dre put out: ever"
In response to Reply # 29


  

          

you are in the minority though.

“So back we go to these questions — friendship, character… ethics.”

  

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bentagain
Member since Mar 19th 2008
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36. "I also remember the anticipation/release of "
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

a solo MC Ren jawn

Cube just went solo. Just like that, so there wasn't much build up.

But heads were geeked for a MC Ren solo album.

Moreso than a Dre solo album

---------------------------------------------------------------

If you can't understand it without an explanation

you can't understand it with an explanation

  

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Dr Claw
Member since Jun 25th 2003
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47. "I remember the commercial for it"
In response to Reply # 36


  

          

>But heads were geeked for a MC Ren solo album.

"KIZZ MY *BEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEP*"

I just wanted to buy it after that

  

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lakai336
Member since Aug 17th 2009
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52. "From a youngsters perspective"
In response to Reply # 36


          

i.e. someone born around the time Straight Outta Compton came out.

I always thought he was the most interesting rapper in the crew. All his verses on NWA shit were among my favorites.

If he ever did put out a solo, I'm yet to check for it, I'll google that some other time. I never knew it was actually something they talked about then though. Interesting.

  

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Dr Claw
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69. "Ren's verse on '100 Miles' is one of the best in rap music, period"
In response to Reply # 52


  

          

>I always thought he was the most interesting rapper in the
>crew. All his verses on NWA shit were among my favorites.

I'll never forget the first time I heard, "since the stereotype is to kill and destruct, is one of the main reasons I DON'T GIVE A FUCK"

I thought then that they'd just be alright w/no Cube after hearing that verse.

Ren's best record is his EP, KIZZ MY BLACK AZZ... it kind of was obscured by the work of Dre, Cube, and Eazy in the time but it was real dope.

  

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micMajestic
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37. "Yes I. Take a hit of the Chronic with Dr. Dre. December 15th. Right"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

here man...

Everybody who had cable TV at the time should remember that, haha.

  

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Mr. Merge
Member since Dec 29th 2005
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Sat Sep-24-11 03:02 PM

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40. "RE: Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chr..."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Man you guys are old!! lol

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The Grim Reaper
Member since Jun 18th 2011
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44. "I first heard it on my sky tell pager"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Then I paged a nigga all the lyrics

  

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kysersozey
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46. "you can't even appreciate what daytona spring break '93 was like..."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I swear, every car riding on the strip was playing that album

*
*
*

  

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G_The_SP
Member since Dec 12th 2005
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49. "RE: Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chr..."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I was a child, but was old for my age and very observant. From what i can remember... and keep in my mind I lived in South Central Los Angeles for most of the '90s... that shit was audio gospel.

I heard Dre and Snoop everywhere I went pretty much. My mom had both The Chronic and Doggy Style on cassette and I would try to sneak and listen to them when i was home alone, even though my mom played them around me in the car all of the time.

Westcoast gangsta rap, particularly Dre and The Chronic was really the first hip-hop that grabbed me and made me pay attention to it and actively acknowledge it. I would say that it had a big impact on me, but ironically I turned out to be 180 from a gangsta, thug, or anything like that in adulthood.

It's an album that I listened to moreso several years after its release, as i approached my pre-teens. But I can't imagine 1993 in South Central without this album being it's official soundtrack.

Ironically, The Chronic is a huge part of my childhood.

~* * *~* * *~* * *~* * *~* * *~* * *~
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lakai336
Member since Aug 17th 2009
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51. "I couldn't tell you a"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun Sep-25-11 12:31 AM by lakai336

          

thing about that. I was probably busy learning to spell my name or something lol as I was four years old.

Always interesting to read about earlier eras, sometimes makes me feel I got gypped coming of age in generation free. Nowadays even the most anticipated album's buzz/conversation-piece status lasts about a month.

Everybody's doing a pretty good job of remember where they were and what was going on when they heard it, definitely a sign of an important album.

  

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SoWhat
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54. "we were getting our driver's licenses then."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

me and my friends.

i couldn't listen to rap in my parents' house, so i had to listen in cars. and that's how i first experienced The Chronic. riding around in cars full of 16 yr old brothers.

'This should be played at high volume. Preferably in a residential area.' LOL my homies loved to crank the shit right when we pulled into my parents' driveway, trying to get me in trouble. it never worked though.

anyway, the hype...'Deep Cover' and 'G Thang' had me pretty amped for The Chronic. those songs were inescapable at skating rinks and house parties.

fuck you.

  

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My_SP1200_Broken_Again
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55. "nothing on the Chronic was as good as "Deep Cover""
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

...pretty disappointing album overall

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Brew
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57. "I laughed."
In response to Reply # 55


          

----------------------------------------

"Fuck aliens." © WarriorPoet415

  

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handle
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60. "This was EXACTLY how I felt"
In response to Reply # 55


          

Still do.

I though the Chronic was too deriative and too smoothed out.

I wanted my life to be mellow and my music to be hectic. Still do.

  

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kysersozey
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61. "lmao... how does it feel to be different?"
In response to Reply # 55


  

          

*
*
*

  

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My_SP1200_Broken_Again
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63. "sorry i was never into "G FUNK" ....."
In response to Reply # 61


  

          

....Deep Cover was raw as fuck ...the songs on the Chronic? not so much , give me NWA over that shit anyway

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-DJ R-Tistic-
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66. "I can actually see an East Coast head feeling that way"
In response to Reply # 63


  

          

But I mean there were some darker songs on Chronic, such as The day the niggaz took over, but of course that was no Deep Cover.

------------------------------

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CanUooooFeeLiT
Member since May 11th 2005
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74. "RE: I can actually see an East Coast head feeling that way"
In response to Reply # 66


  

          

Lyrical Gangbang is the hardest song on The Chronic.

The 2nd side had all the hard cuts from Lyrical Gangbang and Stranded to Bitches Aint sh!t. The Chronic was last album were Dre had some boom bap within his music. From Snoop on it would be strickly G Funk and his style now.

  

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Dr Claw
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83. "I think that might have been my favorite album cut"
In response to Reply # 66


  

          

>The day the niggaz took over

  

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kysersozey
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75. "come on bro, you had to TRY not listening to that album... it owned"
In response to Reply # 63


  

          

the airwaves

*
*
*

  

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mrhood75
Member since Dec 06th 2004
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84. "A whole lot of that album isn't what's become known as "G-Funk" though"
In response to Reply # 63


  

          

Especially the second side of the album. Tracks like "N#$%a with a Gun," "Rat-Tat-Tat-Tat,""Lyrical Gangbang," "High Powered," and "Stranded on Death Row," are solid beats and lyrics, blunted in the studio, almost boom-bap type shit. Throw in the "G-Thing" remix and "Blunts and Tanqueray," and there's a lot of straight-up hip-hop shit recorded for those sessions.

-----------------

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My_SP1200_Broken_Again
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88. "RE: A whole lot of that album isn't what's become known as "G-Funk" thou..."
In response to Reply # 84


  

          

>"G-Thing" remix and "Blunts and Tanqueray," and
>there's a lot of straight-up hip-hop shit recorded for those
>sessions.


these are the only songs I fuck with from the chronic sessions.. and bitches aint shit is dope too even though the beat is similar to g thang remix...

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Brew
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87. "Cmon dogg..."
In response to Reply # 63


          

A track like Deeeez Nutts had a g-funk element but you're gonna try and tell me that song wasn't hard as fuck and was "too smooth"? Fuck that.

----------------------------------------

"Fuck aliens." © WarriorPoet415

  

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My_SP1200_Broken_Again
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96. "never said it was smooth..."
In response to Reply # 87


  

          

....it just wasn't very good

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GumDrops
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78. "lol the east coast bias is strong with this one"
In response to Reply # 55


  

          

  

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-DJ R-Tistic-
Member since Nov 06th 2008
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91. "I'm talkin steroid enhanced 800 bench press maximum strong"
In response to Reply # 78


  

          

------------------------------

50+ FREE Mixes on www.DJR-Tistic.com!

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Dr Claw
Member since Jun 25th 2003
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59. "Hmm... "
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I felt a lot of folks had kind of written Dre off after "No Vaseline" and the fact that while it sold and had some great singles, EFIL4ZAGGIN wasn't quite as good as it would have been with Ice Cube still in the group. Clearly his absence was felt.

"Deep Cover" and the surprise performance from Snoop piqued interest in Dre again, and when "G Thang" came out, I think the hype was properly built for this album.

Without Snoop, I don't think that happens. Dre was now without Eazy, who was undoubtedly the most popular member of NWA now that Cube was gone, without Ren... and Snoop was a virtual unknown who had stolen the show on both songs.

It dropped in the middle of a 1970s revival and I can't help but think that the rise of G-Funk also gave way to the reissuing of a lot of Parliament/Funkadelic albums on CD that had been left to the annals of the 8-track for years. For that, I'm super glad The Chronic hit like it did.

  

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CaliFornicater
Member since May 22nd 2010
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64. "RE: Hmm... "
In response to Reply # 59


  

          

I completely agree.

  

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Original Juice
Member since Oct 03rd 2007
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65. "RE: Let's go back in time to 1992 to the anticipation/release of The Chr..."
In response to Reply # 0


          

"The Chronic" came out when I had just turned 18 years old.

Yeah, we played the shit out of it amongst other albums.. but that one.. man, we definitely played that one end to end, front to back... My personal favorite was the bonus track.. "Bitches Ain't Shit".. I thought Kurupt's style was the sickest shit on that whole album.. But yeah, the cool thing was that everybody loved that album. It was a hit album that we all loved regardless of how deep into rap music you were at the time... like "Raising Hell", "Licensed to Ill", and yes.. "Straight Outta Compton." We didn't think to hard about it or analyze or nothin like that.. In fact, we probably took for granted the fact it was so good.. We didn't anticipate albums or check for release dates.. If a tape for an artist we dug was in the stores, then we either bought it, lifted it, or bought it/dubbed it/and returned it.


White Bronco.


  

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lexx3001
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68. "it was more of a regional thing"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

being here in Boston, NWA was making some buzz but not NEARLY as much as after the Chronic dropped. After Chronic, people revisited NWA hard. As far as I recall, Chronic was THE album. It put that whole camp on the map. It started the whole West Coast/Dre mania. No hype prior to it.

Stay strong

Lexx

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-DJ R-Tistic-
Member since Nov 06th 2008
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92. "I actually learned who Dre + Snoop were b/c of my Godsister from"
In response to Reply # 68


  

          

got damn Tallahassee Florida!

------------------------------

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makaveli
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73. "Great Post"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

i was 10 when the chronic came out, but i was one of those little kids that hung around older kids. i used to love riding around in the car and bumping that with the older dudes. i still remember being stopped at a red light and the 20 dollar sack pyramid was blasting and this poor woman next to us was horrified, of course we couldn't stop laughing.

“So back we go to these questions — friendship, character… ethics.”

  

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cbk
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79. "Last CD I bought that came in that long cardboard box"
In response to Reply # 0


          

D'ANGELO beat tape PART 2: https://chrisp.bandcamp.com/album/dangelo-beat-tape-2020

IPHONE LP2 “A beatmaker who loved” https://music.apple.com/us/album/a-beatmaker-who-loved/1473644375

  

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makaveli
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80. "Ha Yeah I Remember That"
In response to Reply # 79


  

          

then they moved on to those big plastic things if I remember correctly.

“So back we go to these questions — friendship, character… ethics.”

  

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LAbeathustla
Member since Jan 24th 2004
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85. "had just moved to LA summer of 92...i remember the day"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

it came out in december..i rolled up to fox hills mall and bought that cassette from that little record store by used to be by jc pennys...and then just popped it in and rolled around LA for like an hour amazed at that shit..and that I was actually living in LA NOW!!...lol

------------------------------------
2019 CABG Survivor

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be about it or be without it

RIP GOATs

  

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maro
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89. "who was ghost writing for dre on 'the chronic'?"
In response to Reply # 0


          


lurkin since 1999. werd.

  

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Brew
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90. "I thought it was Snoop and DOC no? Maybe Kurupt too?"
In response to Reply # 89


          

Mostly I thought I had heard it was Snoop and DOC though.

----------------------------------------

"Fuck aliens." © WarriorPoet415

  

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makaveli
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94. "Mostly DOC I Think"
In response to Reply # 90


  

          

“So back we go to these questions — friendship, character… ethics.”

  

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mrhood75
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93. "Possibly Deadly Threatt. Possibly MF Grimm"
In response to Reply # 89


  

          

Grimm has said he worked on those early Death Row releases, but has always been (purposely) vague on the details. I figure it was ghost-writing.

-----------------

www.albumism.com

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Brew
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95. "For real? I never heard this."
In response to Reply # 93


          

Where have u seen/heard that?

----------------------------------------

"Fuck aliens." © WarriorPoet415

  

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mrhood75
Member since Dec 06th 2004
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101. "I heard from a few cats that Threat ghost-wrote for a lot..."
In response to Reply # 95


  

          

...of prominent LA rappers during the '90s. People like Ice Cube and everyoneon Death Row not named Kurupt. The Chronic may have been before that time though.

As for MF Grimm, he wrote about it in his bio/graphic novel ("Sentences") of all places. How he went out to LA and worked with Death Row, and was friends with both Dre and Suge, even after they started beefing.

-----------------

www.albumism.com

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NastySpice96
Member since Jul 31st 2008
300 posts
Wed Sep-28-11 08:16 PM

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97. "RE: who was ghost writing for dre on 'the chronic'?"
In response to Reply # 89


          

had no idea Deadly Threat and MF Grimm were involved.

I was told, mostly on dubcnn forums, that Dre's verses on the Chronic were ghost written by Snoop, RBX, and The DOC.

The DOC did lil ghetto boy and n***a wit a gun.

RBX did let me ride and probably the day the n***a's took over.

snoop did g thang and deep cover, and more i'm not sure which ones though.

a lot of the dubcnn insider's were saying that DOC only did those two songs i listed above, and rbx and snoop basically went 50/50 on the rest.

had NO idea that deadly threat was a part of the chronic sessions.

deadly threat was part of snoop's doggystyle records crew (maybe even signed to the label) in 1995 and was going to be heavily featured on the doggstyle records compilation album "haven't you heard" that was supposed to come out in 95 (and was recently released through wideawake with a slightly altered tracklist). idt he was really associated with death row before that.

there is a lot we don't know about the recording of the chronic. like all of those death row releases it is completely shrouded in mystery. erotic d claims that dre started the album with him and the doc right after NWA ended. even before snoop came in. erotic d left early on in the recording process tho.

snoop said, i think, that deep cover and g thang were two of the first songs he did with dre. that makes sense since they (and their respective remixes) have a totally different sound texture than the rest of the chronic songs. they were probably made in a diff studio w/ different equipment.


back to the ghostwriting thing, its crazy how during the nwa doc and cube did all of dre's lyrics... then it was snoop doc and rbx... then for a while (like 94-98) it was j-flexx and drauma (maybe king t too)... then starting in the 2001 sessions he started using a zillion ghostwriters and its been so many cooks in the kitchen ever since. he doesn't have go to guys anymore now its just him picking from a huge entre of lyrics supposedly :/

  

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makaveli
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15465 posts
Thu Sep-29-11 11:02 AM

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99. "Is Haven't You Heard Good?"
In response to Reply # 97


  

          

“So back we go to these questions — friendship, character… ethics.”

  

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NastySpice96
Member since Jul 31st 2008
300 posts
Fri Sep-30-11 09:03 AM

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103. "i loved it"
In response to Reply # 99


          

production was handled mainly by lt hutton, soopafly, and dj pooh. g-funk beats with a swing/bounce feel. rapping was just snoop and his crew saying things that were cool to say in 95. the type of album that u enjoy but don't want to admit you enjoy.

  

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