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Solarus
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3604 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 04:37 AM

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" OkayBlackOurstoryMonth 2002"


  

          

Agoo!(May I have your attention!)

It's that time of the year again when Mcdonald's airs its Black commercials during the Primetime lineup ! For this year i decided to focus on education throughout the Afrikan diaspora. However "education" was (as still is) a life long process and in the traditional Afrikan communities everyone was responsible for educating one another. Therefore call out anyone that you wish.

Also for this year i've decided to no only focus on our past story but also the present and future, as we are living ancestors writing ourstory as we speak!


SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
Ancestors
Feb 01st 2002
1
Carter G. Woodson
Feb 01st 2002
2
John Henrik Clarke
Feb 01st 2002
5
Zumbi dos Palmares
Feb 01st 2002
13
W.E.B. Dubois
Feb 03rd 2002
23
Cheikh Anta Diop
Feb 04th 2002
32
Yaaay!
Feb 07th 2002
46
Amos Wilson
Feb 06th 2002
38
good looking out.
Feb 06th 2002
40
Speaking of Del Jones
Feb 07th 2002
43
Yaa Asantewaa
Feb 07th 2002
45
Warren E. Henry
Feb 13th 2002
53
Patricia Roberts Harris
Feb 19th 2002
63
This is the last day : (....
Feb 27th 2002
77
I'm so glad that you're
Feb 01st 2002
3
RE: I'm so glad that you're
Feb 01st 2002
9
well,
Feb 01st 2002
11
      RE: well,
Feb 01st 2002
12
Phillis Wheatley
Feb 01st 2002
10
      This should read:
Feb 01st 2002
15
I love...
Feb 01st 2002
4
Mary Mc Leod Bethune
Feb 01st 2002
6
Mother Hale...
Feb 01st 2002
7
RE: Elbert R. Robinson
Feb 01st 2002
8
Audre Lorde
Feb 01st 2002
14
I believe this.
Feb 01st 2002
18
      she speaks the truth!
Feb 05th 2002
34
           Yes,
Feb 05th 2002
37
RE: OkayBlackOurstoryMonth 2002
Feb 01st 2002
16
Joe Marshall and Margaret Norris
Feb 01st 2002
17
FRED HAMPTON, SR
Feb 02nd 2002
19
Langston Hughes
Feb 02nd 2002
20
From SUZAR:
Feb 02nd 2002
21
Cothi-Barma
Feb 02nd 2002
22
RE: OkayBlackOurstoryMonth 2002
Feb 03rd 2002
24
delete this post
Feb 03rd 2002
25
Naw.
Feb 03rd 2002
27
RE: delete this post
Feb 07th 2002
44
Thank you.
Feb 03rd 2002
26
      do better
Feb 03rd 2002
28
           YOU do better.
Feb 03rd 2002
29
                I will
Feb 03rd 2002
30
                     Great.
Feb 03rd 2002
31
up.
Feb 04th 2002
33
RE: OkayBlackOurstoryMonth 2002
Feb 05th 2002
35
chekyerinbox.
Feb 05th 2002
36
hey, zesi,
Feb 06th 2002
39
      i'm not zesi, but...
Feb 06th 2002
41
Dorothy Height
Feb 07th 2002
42
I keep forgetting the theme is Education....
Feb 08th 2002
47
Elders
Feb 08th 2002
48
CIBI
Feb 08th 2002
49
Marimba Ani
Feb 10th 2002
51
Mwalimu Bomani Baruti
Feb 12th 2002
52
Mwalimu Yaa Baruti
Feb 14th 2002
54
Now THAT
Feb 18th 2002
59
Grandparents
Feb 15th 2002
55
RE: Grandparents
Feb 18th 2002
57
On playing Kunta's
Feb 18th 2002
58
      Grand-relatives
Feb 19th 2002
60
           WOW.
Feb 19th 2002
61
                Yeah
Feb 20th 2002
64
Judith Jamison
Feb 18th 2002
56
Asa Hilliard
Feb 19th 2002
62
John Hope Franklin
Feb 21st 2002
69
Frances Cress WElsing, M.D.
Feb 23rd 2002
71
Ashra and Merira Kwesi
Feb 25th 2002
72
RE: OkayBlackOurstoryMonth 2002
Ts_Aura9
Feb 08th 2002
50
Afrikan Pedagogy
Feb 21st 2002
65
I'm not sure
Feb 21st 2002
66
KMT
Feb 21st 2002
67
Also
Feb 21st 2002
68
tight...
Feb 26th 2002
74
Shona
Feb 27th 2002
76
Igbo
Mar 01st 2002
78
UP. n/m
Feb 21st 2002
70
RE: NAMES
Feb 26th 2002
73
mae jemison
Feb 26th 2002
75
Shouldn't
Mar 03rd 2002
79

Solarus
Charter member
3604 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 04:45 AM

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1. "Ancestors"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Akwaaba


Education has always been important to Afrikan Diaspora, pre- and post-maafa (great disaster i.e. Transatlantic slave Trade). Education is sole reason for our survival. This does not mean education in the limited Western sense of reading, writing and arithmetic but also encompassing adaptation to the environment, spiritual growth, social and economic awareness, sustaining political structures, physical health, kwk. Call out our deceased ancestors that have contributed our education and development throughout the ages!


SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Solarus
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3604 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 04:47 AM

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2. "Carter G. Woodson"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Akwaaba

Many may be familiar with Carter G. Woodson as he was one of the black "elite" of his day being a graduate of Harvard and a "respected" scholar (respected by many non-Afrikans). My reasoning for mentioning him is because his efforts are the reason there is a "Black History Month." He is also known as the "Father of Black History" because of his undying efforts to preserve AFrican-American culture. Although he may not have been as "radical" as others of his time one cannot bypass his contributions particularly by way of the pivotal work, _The Miseducation of The Negro_. In this work he made in clear that Afrikans are under purposeful attack through the malignant education of the Afrikan within the American schooling system. EVERY AFRIKAN IN AMERICA MUST READ THIS BOOK! This book should be required reading for teachers AND students, as it exposes the fallacies and trappings of a system meant for Afrikan failure. Despite its age it is still relevant for today.




Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History (ASALH), national organization founded in 1915 to popularize and promote African American history. The Association for the Study of Negro Life and History (ASNLH) was founded by historian Carter G. Woodson in Washington, D.C., on September 9, 1915. Woodson founded the ASNLH partially in response to the release of D. W. Griffith's racist film, The Birth of a Nation (1915). As a black alternative to the unofficially segregated American Historical Association (established by white historians in 1884), the ASNLH was dedicated to using scholarship to refute racist and erroneous ideas about African American life and history. Originally Woodson ran the ASNLH with his colleagues George Cleveland Hall, Alexander L. Jackson, and James E. Stamps. The association encouraged and supported African American historical research and provided important publication outlets for black scholars, including the Journal of Negro History, created in 1916, and the popular Negro History Bulletin, founded in 1937. Through these publications and other activities, the association was instrumental in influencing white public opinion.

In 1926 Woodson established an annual Negro History Week, seven days in February (the birth month of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass) devoted to the celebration of black history and culture. After Woodson's death in 1950, the ASNLH struggled with funding problems, but the leadership of Mary McLeod Bethune (ASNLH president from 1936 to 1951), and Charles Harris Wesley (ASNLH president in 1951 and executive director from 1965 to 1972) ensured the association's survival. In 1972 the organization's name was changed to the Association for the Study of Afro-American Life and History (ASALH), and in 1976, under the guidance of executive director J. Rupert Picott, Negro History Week was expanded to Black History Month.

SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Utamaroho
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17658 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 07:05 AM

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5. "John Henrik Clarke"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

John Henrik Clarke
His People's Historian

John Henrik Clarke was born January 1, 1915 in Union Springs, Alabama and died July 16, 1998 in New York City. His mother, Willie Ella Mays Clark, was a washerwoman who did laundry for $3 a week. His father was a sharecropper. As a youngster Clark caddied for Dwight Eisenhower and Omar Bradley "long before they became Generals or President," Clarke recalls in describing his upbringing in rural Alabama.
Clarke was inspired by his third grade teacher, Ms. Harris, who "convinced me that one day I would be a writer." But before he became a writer he became a voracious reader. Inspired by Richard Wright's Black Boy, Clarke went to New York via Chicago. He enlisted in the army and earned the rank of Master Sergeant. After mustering out, Clarke moved to Harlem and committed himself to a lifelong pursuit of factual knowledge about the history of his people and creative application of that knowledge.

Over the years, Clarke became both a major historian and a man of letters. Although he is probably better known as a historian, his literary accomplishments were also significant. He wrote over two hundred short stories. "The Boy Who Painted Christ Black" is his best known short story. Clarke edited numerous literary and historical anthologies including American Negro Short Stories (1966), an anthology which included nineteenth century writing from writers such as Paul Laurence Dunbar and Charles Waddell Chestnut, and continued up through the early sixties with writers such as LeRoi Jones (Amiri Baraka) and William Melvin Kelley. This is one of the classic collections of Black fiction.

Reflective of his commitment to his adopted home, Clarke also edited Harlem, A Community in Transition and Harlem, U.S.A. Never one to shy away from the difficult or the controversial, Clarke edited anthologies on Malcolm X and a major collection of essays decrying William Styron's "portrait" of Nat Turner as a conflicted individual who had a love/hate platonic and sexually-fantasized relationship with Whites. In both cases, Clarke's work was in defense of the dignity and pride of his beloved Black community rather than an attack on Whites. What is significant is that Clarke did the necessary and tedious organizing work to bring these volumes into existence and thereby offer an alternative outlook from the dominant mainstream views on Malcolm X and Nat Turner, both of whom were often characterized as militant hate mongers. Clarke understood the necessity for us to affirm our belief in and respect for radical leaders such as Malcolm X and Nat Turner. It is interesting to note that Clarke's work was never simply focused on investigating history as the past, he also was proactively involved with history in the making.

As a historian Clarke also edited a book on Marcus Garvey and edited Africa, Lost and Found (with Richard Moore and Keith Baird) and African People at the Crossroads, two seminal historical works widely used in History and African American Studies disciplines on college and university campuses. Through the United Nations he published monographs on Paul Robeson and W.E.B. DuBois. As an activist-historian he produced the monograph Christopher Columbus and the African Holocaust. His most recently published book was Who Betrayed the African Revolution?

In the form of edited books, monographs, major essays and book introductions, John Henrik Clarke produced well over forty major historical and literary documents. Rarely, if ever, has one man delivered so much quality and inspiring literature. Moreover, John Henrik Clarke was also an inquisitive student who became a master teacher.

During his early years in Harlem, Clarke made the most of the rare opportunities to be mentored by many of the great 20th century Black historians and bibliophile. Clarke studied under and learned from men such as Arthur Schomburg, William Leo Hansberry, John G. Jackson, Paul Robeson, Willis Huggins and Charles Seiffert, all of whom, sometimes quietly behind the scenes and other times publicly in the national and international spotlight, were significant movers and shakers, theoreticians and shapers of Black intellectual and social life in the 20th century.

From the sixties on, John Henrik Clarke stepped up and delivered the full weight of his own intellectual brilliance and social commitment to the ongoing struggle for Black liberation and development. Clarke became a stalwart member and hard worker in (and sometimes co-founder of) organizations such as The Harlem Writers Guild, Presence Africaine, African Heritage Studies Association, the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History, the National Council of Black Studies and the Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations.

Formally, Clarke lectured and held professorships at universities worldwide. His longer and most influential tenures were at the Africana Studies and Research Center at Cornell in Ithaca, New York, and in African and Puerto Rican Studies at Hunter College in New York City. He received honorary degrees from numerous institutions and served as consultant and advisor to African and Caribbean heads of state. In 1997 he was the subject of a major documentary directed by the noted filmmaker Saint Claire Bourne and underwritten by the Hollywood star Westley Snipes.

John Henrik Clarke is in many ways exemplary of the American ethos of the self-made man. Indicative of this characteristic is the fact that Clarke changed his given name of John Henry Clark to reflect his aspirations. In an obituary he penned for himself shortly before his death, John Henrik Clarke noted "little black Alabama boys were not fully licensed to imagine themselves as conduits of social and political change. ...they called me 'bubba' and because I had the mind to do so, I decided to add the 'e' to the family name 'Clark' and change the spelling of 'Henry' to 'Henrik,' after the Scandinavian rebel playwright, Henrik Ibsen. I like his spunk and the social issues he addressed in 'A Doll's House.' ...My daddy wanted me to be a farmer; feel the smoothness of Alabama clay and become one of the first blacks in my town to own land. But, I was worried about my history being caked with that southern clay and I subscribed to a different kind of teaching and learning in my bones and in my spirit."

Body and soul, John Henrik Clarke was a true champion of Black people. He bequeathed us a magnificent legacy of accomplishment and inspiration borne out of the earnest commitment of one irrepressible young man to make a difference in the daily and historical lives of his people. Viva, John Henrik Clarke!

Red, Black, Green

  

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el_rey
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5626 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 11:24 AM

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13. "Zumbi dos Palmares"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Zumbi was the legendary leader of the great Palmares, one of the largest ever quilombo's (communities of Africans who had escaped slavery) in the North of Brasil. He was said to have been the Nephew of an African Princess, and for many years Zumbi's leadership thwarted the many attempts of the Portuguese to capture him and destroy Palmares. His eventual defeat and death has since been marked as national black consciousness day by the modern black movement in Brazil.

You can find out more about Zumbi dos Palmares at the following web sites:
http://www.oneworld.org/sejup/race.htm
http://www.britannica.com/
http://ngilegacy.com/departements/history.htm
http://www.press.jhu.edu/demo/callaloo/18.4introduction.html


love and respect,
El Rey

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"Yo he preferido hablar a cosas
imposibles, porque de lo posible se
sabe demasiado." -- Silvio Rodriguez

"if jesus was alive today
he'd be incarcerated
with the rest of the brothers
while uh
the devil would have a great
apartment
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be a guest v.j.
on total request live" - Me'Shell
(god.fear.money)

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
who are you









really

  

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Solarus
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3604 posts
Sun Feb-03-02 07:28 AM

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23. "W.E.B. Dubois"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Akwaaba

Dubois is probably won of the most loved/hated figures of African-American history. Because of his education and pride, he was always outspoken. First European-Americans hated him then loved him then hated him again while African-Americans remained split in their liking/disliking of him but he still remained close to his people's hearts. One of the main reasons is because his ideas/values changed throughout the his long life. Because of his 90+ years of life (1868-1963), the pivotal events/movements occuring during these years and his love for Afrikans, he was able to try many methods of securing Afrikan self-definition/freedom realizing that at the end the only thing that would work for Afrikans was to start our own ish.

By many modern-day Afrikans, he is condemned for his promotion of the "Talented Tenth/Negro Elite" concept, alleged participation in the Negro Boule and his often abusive and verbal discrediting of Garvey and his movement (which was direct effect of being a member of the pro-establishment, integrationist/assimilationist organization NAACP).

However Dubois never truly "disagreed" with Garvey, and eventually realized that there is no hope in trying to secure one's rights from someone else, eventually culminating to his expatriation from America and resettling in Ghana at the end of his life.

His speech, "Whither Now and Why," delivered three years before his death in 1960 to the Annula Conference to the Association of Social Science Teachers, exposes the evolution of ideas to a prophetic revelation of cultural preservation that later AFrikans would realize is essential to Afrikan liberation, versus the integrationist/assimilationist rhetoric that was popular at his time.

Excerpt from "Whither Now and Why?":

"That would mean that we would cease to be Negroes as such and become white in action if not completely in color. We would take on the culture of whiete Americans doing as they do and thinking as they think. Manifestly this would not be satisfactory. Physcially it would mean that we would be integrated with Americans losing first of all, the physical evidence of color and hair and racial type. We would lose our memory of Negro history and of thos racial peculiarities which have long been associated withe the Negro. We would cease to acknowledge any greater tie with Africa than with England or Germany. We would not try to develop Negro music and Art and Literature as distinctive and different, but allow them to be further degraded as is the case today. We would always, if possible, marry lighter-hued people so as to have children who are not identified with the Negro race, and thus solve our racial problem in America by committting racial suicide. More or less clearly this possibility has been in the minds of Negroes in the past, although not assented to by al. Asome have stated it and welcomed it. Others have simply assumed that this development was inevitalbe and therefore notheing could be done about it. This is the reason that my Pan-African Movement which began in 1900 when I cooperated with a meeting in London and definitely was started in 1919, in the first Pan-African Congress in Paris, could get but little support and cooperation among American Negroes. Most of them resented it as being a "back to AFrica" movement without taking on the insoluble problems of Africa."



In 1895 William Edward Burghardt DuBois became the first African-American to receive a doctorate from Harvard University. A scholar and a political activist, Du Bois was a university professor who in 1910 helped found the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). During the 1940s and '50s, Du Bois disagreed with black leaders such as Booker T. Washington, who urged integration into white society; Du Bois championed global African unity and separatism. In 1961 he emigrated to Ghana and became a citizen. He was a prolific writer and a pioneering social scientist whose most famous book, The Souls of Black Folk (1903) is still widely read.



SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Solarus
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3604 posts
Mon Feb-04-02 05:03 AM

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32. "Cheikh Anta Diop"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Akwaaba



"In practice it is possible to determine directly the skin colour and hence the ethnic affiliations of the ancient Egyptians by microscopic analysis in the laboratory; I doubt if the sagacity of the researchers who have studied the question has overlooked the possibility."
--Cheikh Anta Diop

Cheikh Anta Diop, a modern champion of African identity, was born in Diourbel, Senegal on December 29, 1923. At the age of twenty-three, he journeyed to Paris, France to continue advanced studies in physics. Within a very short time, however, he was drawn deeper and deeper into studies relating to the African origins of humanity and civilization. Becoming more and more active in the African student movements then demanding the independence of French colonial possessions, he became convinced that only by reexamining and restoring Africa's distorted, maligned and obscured place in world history could the physical and psychological shackles of colonialism be lifted from our Motherland and from African people dispersed globally. His initial doctoral dissertation submitted at the University of Paris, Sorbonne in 1951, based on the premise that Egypt of the pharaohs was an African civilization--was rejected. Regardless, this dissertation was published by Presence Africaine under the title Nations Negres et Culture in 1955 and won him international acclaim. Two additional attempts to have his doctorate granted were turned back until 1960 when he entered his defense session with an array of sociologists, anthropologists and historians and successfully carried his argument. After nearly a decade of titanic and herculean effort, Diop had finally won his Docteur es Lettres! In that same year, 1960, were published two of his other works--the Cultural Unity of Black Africa and and Precolonial Black Africa.

During his student days, Cheikh Anta Diop was an avid political activist. From 1950 to 1953 he was the Secretary-General of the Rassemblement Democratique Africain (RDA) and helped establish the first Pan-African Student Congress in Paris in 1951. He also participated in the First World Congress of Black Writers and Artists held in Paris in 1956 and the second such Congress held in Rome in 1959. Upon returning to Senegal in 1960, Dr. Diop continued his research and established a radiocarbon laboratory in Dakar. In 1966, the First World Black Festival of Arts and Culture held in Dakar, Senegal honored Dr. Diop and Dr. W.E.B. DuBois as the scholars who exerted the greatest influence on African thought in twentieth century. In 1974, a milestone occurred in the English-speaking world when the African Origin of Civilization: Myth or Reality was finally published. It was also in 1974 that Diop and Theophile Obenga collectively and soundly reaffirmed the African origin of pharaonic Egyptian civilization at a UNESCO sponsored symposium in Cairo, Egypt. In 1981, Diop's last major work, Civilization or Barbarism: An Authentic Anthropology was published.

Dr. Diop was the Director of Radiocarbon Laboratory at the Fundamental Institute of Black Africa (IFAN) at the University of Dakar. He sat on numerous international scientific committees and achieved recognition as one of the leading historians, Egyptologists, linguists and anthropologists in the world. He traveled widely, lectured incessantly and was cited and quoted voluminously. He was regarded by many as the modern `pharaoh' of African studies. Cheikh Anta Diop died quietly in sleep in Dakar, Senegal on February 7, 1986.


SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Solarus
Charter member
3604 posts
Thu Feb-07-02 07:53 AM

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46. "Yaaay!"
In response to Reply # 32


  

          

Akwaaba

Diop made the transition to ancestorship today in 1986!!!!!

SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Solarus
Charter member
3604 posts
Wed Feb-06-02 04:41 AM

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38. "Amos Wilson"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Akwaaba



One of our most cherished Pan-Afrikan Revolutionary thinkers, the late Dr. Amos Wilson was one who committed his life to study and critically attacked the anti-Afrikan theory of racist psychology. Dr. Wilson was and still is one of Afrika's children's most cherished sons, whose brilliant documentation confronts
our mental confusion and brings clarity to some of the real shit-uations that continue to confront our people.

His contributions to the race are invaluable, delivering unto us an array of self liberating information, written and spoken for our continuing fight and chosen right to bathe ourselves in complete mental freedom.

Encased inside many well written books and eloquently spoken speeches, Dr. Wilson's work is perfected to an art of literary and verbal references. References designed to help us break all psychological chains that mentally stunt our ability to win this war. His work holds one of the many keys needed to unlock the arresting effects of mentacide that continues to have
complete control of our Pan-Afrikan development.

He was a brilliant Author, Lecturer and Teacher who loved himself and his people. His work teaches us that we can no longer sit and intellectualize our demise as our children are swallowed alive in their cesspools of ordered misery. Misery seeped in self inflicted
imitative madness that drives our young into a hypnotic violent behavior that results in self destruction.

Dr. Wilson gives us understanding about the state of our children's existence. He helps us realize that we can no longer allow our enemies to under-educate, miseducate and control the minds of our beautiful futures. With a committed sense of purpose, Dr. Wilson's work examines how easily the residue of yesterdays physically chained abuse turns our youth into Negro puppets of poison, who feast upon a daily diet of their own self hatred.

The work of our wonderful Ancestor takes us on a psychological journey into the minds of young Afrikans, guiding and helping those who realize the major source and reasons for "BLACK ON BLACK VIOLENCE." He gives us mental rehabilitation in "UNDERSTANDING BLACK ADOLESCENT MALE VIOLENCE."

He turns many Afrikan corners to explain the "DEVELOPMENT PSYCHOLOGY OF THE BLACK CHILD" as he teaches that "AWAKENING THE NATURAL GENIUS OF BLACK CHILDREN" will guide our tomorrows into promising futures, ready to take freedom into the homestretch of the next millennium.

Dr. Wilson delivered spellbinding lectures with a definite sense of Afrikan centered purpose in the
"FALSIFICATION OF AFRIKAN CONSCIOUSNESS" as he breaks down the political psychology of black consciousness.
He brilliantly attacks the politics of white supremist ideology that connects the racist school of thought that they call psychology.

He guides our minds into the reality of their
continued attempt to destroy Blacks by mentally creating and physically maintaining self destructing mechanisms to control Black Culture. He proves that Amerikkka systematically subjects us to self hating behavior in order to keep us powerless and unable to regain control of our own destinies.

Dr. Wilson shows his readers the effects of white domination played out in the passive and or criminal behavior of our people that allows our children to run amuck in a designed state of hopelessness. A
hopelessness, played out inside misguided aggression, confused depression and or passive acceptance as the backwards culture of white domination lulls them into
an unconscious state of existence.

Our children's minds, raped of all that is sane and molested by the insane becomes dead weight as they are easily manipulated and maneuvered into a state of frenzied madness, living a life with death wails constantly knocking down their doorways of tomorrows.

Brother Amos teaches us that the demise of our race can be directly linked to the survival of white domination as it psychologically engineers its continuous strategy to destabilize the very core of Afrikan normality. This of course, causes the race to maintain a false sense of dependency on our own enemies.

He also showed us, our indirect responsibility for the state of the race's foe allowing them to continue their mythical invention of white supremacy. It is their story that has created his-story to eliminate our-story and as long as we allow them to keep us in a state of amnesia about the reality of our glorious lineage,
their lies become the uncontested truth, stapled to the insanity of the so-called great white way.

After reading and studying Dr. Amos Wilson, you will understand that white supremacy's ugly head will continue to eat us alive and digest every morsel of who we are and should be, while defecating upon the very essence of our beautiful culture.

Dr. Wilson gives us "A BLUEPRINT FOR BLACK POWER," teaching us that it is our responsibility to end the exploitation of our own, both here in the belly of the beast and abroad where their control constantly destroys the lives of our people.

Brother Amos called for social, economical, political and psychological change in order to eradicate the white hands of time that methodically and expediently destroys the mind of the Afrikan. Professor Amos Wilson proved his love for his people through his unselfish acts of revolutionary commitment.

His critical thinking awards him the Imhotep title of Afrikan Genius. His liberating books are loaded with Pan-Afrikan love and his dynamic lectures are beautifully spoken words of wisdom that can and will help in our struggle to return to the source.

Dr. Amos Wilson, teacher, writer, lecturer and lover of his people has truly left us a wonderful legacy, filled with the endless energy of his warrior strength to continue his fight for the freedom of Afrikan Consciousness.

We remember Brother Amos with much love, respect and adoration as he stands tall, black and proud among the ranks of our very own special Revolutionary Ancestors. His contribution in life keeps him alive in our ongoing protracted struggle to WIN THIS WAR.

It is with strong Pan-Afrikan pride that I leave you with Professor Wilson's own exhilarating words of black wisdom as we celebrate his life, cherish his
Revolutionary commitment and continue his legacy with uncompromising dedication for Afrikan liberation.


PROFESSOR AMOS WILSON SPEAKS:

"When we speak of Afrikan American/ Pan Afrikan self
empowerment, we refer not to bogus illusory "power"
of token Black house servants, the mock White "power"
of Black politicians. We neither include the
pie-in-the-sky White God fearing "power" of Black preachers; the oleagenous diplomatic "power" of puppeted neocolonial Afrikan "heads of state," powers which needs to ask the permission or authorization of any other race to express and actualize themselves; nor the reactionary, self-destroying community decimating "power" of the Black-on-Black criminal!

We speak here of a true and honest Afrikan/Pan Afrikan Power, which springs full-force from Afrikan manhood, womanhood and and humanity; a power which harnesses the abundant intellectual, emotional, behavioral, cultural, spiritual and material resources of Afrikan peoples and uses them to secure and protect the survival, well being and self actualization of the total Afrikan community. This power we seek will not be given; it must be taken. This is the moment of truth. The Afrikan American/Pan Afrikan community MUST DO-OR-DIE-."

SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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poetx
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58767 posts
Wed Feb-06-02 11:04 AM

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40. "good looking out."
In response to Reply # 38


  

          

i'd posted awhile ago that i had ordered his book, Awakening the Natural Genius of Black Children (damn bookstore hasn't called me back yet). when i've gotten it and digested it, i'll post a synopsis, separately.

peace & blessings,

x.

peace & blessings,

x.

www.twitter.com/poetx

=========================================
I'm an advocate for working smarter, not harder. If you just
focus on working hard you end up making someone else rich and
not having much to show for it. (c) mad

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Thu Feb-07-02 04:12 AM

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43. "Speaking of Del Jones"
In response to Reply # 38


  

          

Reality Speaks will be bringing him to Soujourner-Douglass Saturday, March 9th from 7p.-10p. All of the rest of the info is the same as:

http://www.okayplayer.com/dcforum/DCForumID1/6231.html#6



"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"'Cuz U answer the phone 'peace' that means U not a freak?"-The Questions(c) Common


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Thu Feb-07-02 04:22 AM

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45. "Yaa Asantewaa"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          


Queen Mother Yaa Asantewaa (1850-1921) of the Asante (Ashanti) people of Ghana, led the heroic and ultimately successful struggle to maintain her people's national integrity and ancient cultural heritage.

@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@
Yaa Asantewaa was the queen mother of the Edweso tribe of the Asante (Ashanti) in what is modern Ghana. At the time, the Gold Coast (west-central Africa) was under the British protectorate. The British supported their campaigns against the Asante with taxes levied upon the local population. In addition, they took over the state-owned gold mines thus removing considerable income from the Asante government. Missionary schools were also established and the missionaries began interfering in local affairs.
When the Asante began rebelling against the British rule, the British attempted to put down the unrests. Furthermore, the British governor, Lord Hodgson, demanded that the Asante turn over to them the Golden Stool, i.e. the throne and a symbol of Asante independence. Capt. C. H. Armitage was sent out to force the people to tell him where the Golden Stool was hidden and to bring it back. After going from village to village with no success, Armitage found at the village of Bare only the children who said their parents had gone hunting. In response, Armitage ordered the children to be beaten. When their parents came out of hiding to defend the children, he had them bound and beaten, too.

This brutality was the instigation for the Yaa Asantewaa War for Independence which began on March 28, 1900. Yaa Asantewaa mobilized the Asante troops and for three months laid siege to the British mission at the fort of Kumasi. The British had to bring in several thousand troops and artillery to break the siege. Also, in retaliation, the British troops plundered the villages, killed much of the population, confiscated their lands and left the remaining population dependent upon the British for survival. They also captured Queen Yaa Asantewaa whom they exiled along with her close companions to the Seychelle Islands off Africa's east coast, while most of the captured chiefs became prisoners-of-war. Yaa Asantewaa remained in exile until her death twenty years later.







"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"'Cuz U answer the phone 'peace' that means U not a freak?"-The Questions(c) Common


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Wed Feb-13-02 10:34 AM

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53. "Warren E. Henry"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

birth: 1909, place: Evergreen, Alabama

died: October 31, 2001

Warren Elliot Henry was born on a peanut farm in Evergreen, Alabama. Both parents were graduates of Tuskegee Institute, and George Washington Carver lived on Henry's parent's farm doing research during summer months. Little Warren learned how to read when he was 4 and occasionally went on walks with his father and Carver. He was allowed to stay up past bedtime only if he were studying or reading.

Henry attended Tuskegee Institute, where he majored in three subjects Mathematics, English and French. Although Dr. Carver was retired by then, he was still on campus doing research and conducting a bible study class, which Warren Henry also attended. In 1931, Henry earned a Bachelor of Science from Tuskegee Institute, and then served as a principal at a segregated school in rural Ardmore, Alabama.

As a school principal, Henry received a summer scholarship at Atlanta University. At the end of the summer, he received a tuition scholarship at Atlanta university. While in graduate school, he taught classes at Spelman and Morehouse Colleges. In 1937, Henry earned an Master of Science in Orhanic Chemstry from Atlanta University.

The Summer after he earned his M.S., Henry studied at the University of Chicago. At the end, a professor, Anton Berg, asked whether he intended to study for the Ph.D. Berg said there was no money, but Henry would have their moral support. Henry stayed as this period (1938-41) was exciting and stimulating, he was exposed to the latest thoughts of the originators of modern physics theories. He passed the language requirements (French and German) the first month at the school. Henry was the only one of five students who took the Ph.D. Qualifying Examination the next January.

It was for Dr. Henry, the beginning of a long association with scientists who either had already won Nobel prizes in chemistry and physics, or were destined to do so. Arthur Compton taught him quantum mechanics, Wolfgang Pauli taught nuclear forces, Robert Millikan taught molecular spectra. He played tennis with Dr. Enrico Fermi who won the Nobel prize for achieving the first sustained chain reaction in a nuclear reactor. (over his career, he has been associated with more than 17 Nobel prize winners). Warren Henry earned a Ph.D. (Physical Chemistry) from the University of Chicago in 1941. He wanted to continue with research, and in those days a Ph.D. should have guaranteed him a research position, but only the historically black schools offered him a job, teaching. Thus, he returned to Tuskeegee Institute, where he taught courses. Some of his students were members of the 99th Pursuit Suadron, part of the later famous Tuskegee Airmen.

A friend, P.R. Bell, from the University of Chicago, helped Dr. Henry find a wartime position at MIT's Top-secret Radiation Laboratory (1943-1946). There Dr. Henry developed video amplifiers that were used in portable radar systems on warships. He was recruited by Dr. Clarence Zener (Zener Diode) for a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Institute of Metal at the U. of Chicago, Warren Henry became chair the Department of Physics at Morehouse College.

The summer after his year at Morehouse, Warren wanted to do low temperature research, but was turned down at Rutgers University for a request to use their equipment (this was around the time Rutgers refused to allow Paul Robeson sing in its choir) . He told his disappointment to an acquaintance at the Office of Naval Research. He was told to go to the Naval Research Laboratory and tell them to hire him for a two month stay. Dr. Henry then said, "At the end of two months, I was asked by Dr. Richard Dolecek to stay. I stayed for 12 years." (1948-1960). During the 1950s his research and knowledge of materials at extremely low temperatures was probably unsurpassed in the U.S. While at the Naval Research Laboratory, Henry headed the group that installed the high field Bitter Magnet. Henry also worked at UC Berkeley as a guest investigator at the Giauque Lab under the auspices of Glenn Seaborg. In the 1960's while at Lockheed Space and Missile Co., he developed guidance systems for the detection of submarines and helped to design the hover craft that was specially developed for use in night fighting during the Vietnam War.

Warren E. Henry's nearly seven decades of work in the fields of magnetism and superconductivity have earned him praise as one of the most eminent African American scientists in this nation's history. He has written or contributed to hundreds of scientific articles and co-authored the 1934 book, Procedures in Elementary Qualitative Chemical Analysis . His monograph on paramagnetism (Halliday and Resnick Electricity and Magnetism ) has been a physics textbook standard in this country for years. His demonstration of the proof of non-interacting paramagnetic ions is a significant contribution and is included in many textbooks. Students often are first introduced to Henry's work in courses on solid state physics or material science, where his research is quoted extensively.

Warren E. Henry was a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He was also the recipient of awards such as: The Tuskegee Alumni Award, Carver Award, Outstanding Educator in America, Lifetime Achievement Award in the Community from the National Science Foundation and the 1997 Technical Achiever of the Year Award from the National Technical Association. In March, 1997 he received the 1st Annual Golden Torch Award for Lifetime Achievement in Engineering, which was sponsored by the National Society of Black Engineers. He was also awarded the National Science Foundation's Lifetime Achievement Award in Community Service. He has also been nominated for the National Medal of Science, the highest US science honor given by the nation's President. The nomination was submitted by Dr. Glenn Seaborg, and supported by Dr. Robert Schrieffer both Nobel Laureates and other noted scientists. In 1997 he was honored by Howard University and Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California.


Dr. Henry retired in 1977, but Henry continued, for another twenty years, involvement with a program for Blacks called Minorities Access to Research Careers (MARC), which encourages third and fourth-year college students to be members of scientific teams. In 1980, his wife of many years, Jean Pearlson Henry, died

***************************************************************
Dr. Henry was one of my advisors at Howard. He was one of the most intelligent people I have ever met. AND kind. We were lucky to have been blessed w/ his presence for 92 years.


"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Tue Feb-19-02 02:55 PM

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63. "Patricia Roberts Harris"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          


Harris, Patricia Roberts (b. May 31, 1924, Mattoon, Ill.; d. March 23, 1985, Washington, D.C.), first black American woman to serve as an ambassador, a cabinet secretary, and a law school dean.

Patricia Roberts was born and raised in a working-class suburb of Chicago. She accepted a scholarship from Howard University in Washington, D.C., where in 1943 she participated in one of the country's first student sit-ins, at a whites-only cafeteria in a black neighborhood. She later attended law school at Washington's George Washington University, from which she graduated first in her class. In 1961, she joined the faculty of Howard Law School.

A lifelong Democrat, Harris served on several federal commissions concerned with minority rights. In 1965, largely on the strength of this work, President Johnson appointed her U.S. ambassador to Luxembourg. After a brief and noncontroversial posting, she returned to Howard in 1967 and in 1969 was named dean of the law school. Immediately after her appointment, students protested for greater power in university decisions. Harris took a strong stand against them and, when she felt she was not supported by the school's president, resigned. She had served as dean for one month. For the next eight years she practiced law in a Washington firm and continued her national party activities.

In 1977, President Jimmy Carter nominated Harris secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). Her confirmation hearings were contentious, mostly because liberals feared her close connection to "the establishment" would make her unsympathetic to HUD's poor constituency. In a well-publicized reply to such fears, Harris told the Senate, "You do not seem to understand who I am. I'm a black woman, the daughter of a dining car waiter. . . . I am a black woman who could not buy a house eight years ago in parts of the District of Columbia." She was confirmed, the first black woman to direct a federal department. During her tenure, she secured greater funding for HUD, which she used to dramatically increase the number of new subsidized homes and to rehabilitate rather than destroy old homes. She also promoted grants to attract businesses to blighted areas and vouchers to give poor people greater choice in housing.

In 1979, Carter appointed Harris secretary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), later the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). At HEW, her main task was protecting social programs from the budget cuts of the late 1970s. Her tenure was cut short by the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980.

In 1982, Harris ran for mayor of Washington against incumbent Marion Barry. In a bitter campaign, Barry depicted her as the elitist candidate of the middle and upper classes who had lost touch with Washington's large population of poor blacks. Harris was soundly defeated in the primary. For the next two years, she taught law at George Washington University. She died of breast cancer a few months after the death of her husband.




"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Wed Feb-27-02 08:51 PM

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77. "This is the last day : (...."
In response to Reply # 1


  

          


TIYE:
THE NUBIAN QUEEN OF KEMET (Ancient Egypt) (1415-1340 B.C.)
Black, beautiful and georgous, Queen Tiye is regarded as one of the most influential Queens ever to rule Kemet. A princess of Nubian birth, she married the Kemetan King Amenhotep III who ruled during the New Kingdom Dynasties around 1391BC. Queen Tiye held the title of "Great Royal Wife" and acted upon it following the end of her husband's reign. It was Tiye who held sway over Kemet during the reign of her three sons Amenhotep IV (Akhenaton), Smenkhare, and the famous child king Tut-ankh-amen. For nearly half of a century, Tiye governed Kemet, regulated her trade, and protected her borders. During this time, she was believed to be the standard of beauty in the ancient world.





"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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knumskul
Charter member
1038 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 06:48 AM

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3. "I'm so glad that you're"
In response to Reply # 0


          

doing this again.

>However "education" was
>(as still is) a life
>long process and in the
>traditional Afrikan communities everyone was
>responsible for educating one another.
> Therefore call out anyone
>that you wish.

Off the top of my head, I'd like to call out Standard Deviant, Janey, M2, Utamaroho, Guerilla Love, Nettrice, and Solarus...all phenomenal teachers. Thanks yall!!

Carry on

y'all *really* think" that you're tricking somebody into something don't you? what you don't realize is that most women decide within the first 5 minutes of meeting a dude whether or not they'll sleep with him. all your "game" is merely entertainment. - H

  

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jenNjuice
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3527 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 10:52 AM

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9. "RE: I'm so glad that you're"
In response to Reply # 3


          

>Standard Deviant, Janey, M2, Utamaroho, Guerilla Love, Nettrice, >and Solarus..

are these the gods of this board?


"The only thing we wanted for our country was the right to a decent existence, to dignity without hypocrisy , to independence without restrictions... The day will come when history will have its say."-Lumumba

  

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knumskul
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1038 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 11:08 AM

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11. "well,"
In response to Reply # 9


          

a couple of em might like to think so

Stay a while and they're guaranteed to teach you _something_...as you, them.

y'all *really* think" that you're tricking somebody into something don't you? what you don't realize is that most women decide within the first 5 minutes of meeting a dude whether or not they'll sleep with him. all your "game" is merely entertainment. - H

  

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jenNjuice
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3527 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 11:11 AM

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12. "RE: well,"
In response to Reply # 11


          

o.k solarus, utumaraho standard deviant..IM LATE..
teach..i have shed my foolish pride, and i am at your mercy..i expect to hear from ya'll soon..peace

"The only thing we wanted for our country was the right to a decent existence, to dignity without hypocrisy , to independence without restrictions... The day will come when history will have its say."-Lumumba

  

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knumskul
Charter member
1038 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 11:02 AM

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10. "Phillis Wheatley"
In response to Reply # 3


          

Phillis Wheatley, the first African American to publish a book and the first to achieve an international reputation as a writer, has been one of the most controversial and enigmatic figures in the history of American literature. She seems to have had little taste for controversy herself, but with a pen in her hand and a book in her name, Wheatley became, inevitably, a point of contention for others. Born in West Africa and enslaved in America, Phillis grew up in a fixed and prejudged position in the white social order; she was the alien, the dependent, the talking chattel. But sometime in her teens Wheatley decided, on her own, to add to the list of her predetermined social identities – The Negro, the woman, the slave – a new name, that of poet. Ever since that decision, the question of how to interpret and evaluate Wheatley, a poet in light of her status as a black female slave in eighteenth-century New England has been the critical crux, the first order of business, for students of Wheatley and the beginnings of African American literature.

The mere fact of an African-born slave woman’s writing poetry in English, her adopted language, was stunning news to whites who encountered Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral By Phillis Wheatley, of Boston, in New England when it first appeared in London in September 1773. Since the revolution in European thought and expression known as the Enlightenment, the assumption among even the educated white elite was that Black African’s where incapable of the highest forms of civilization, such as expression and mathematical calculation, and were, therefore, fit only for enslavement by their supposed superiors in Europe. To the whites of Europe and the America’s, writing provided demonstrable evidence of reason. Creative writing, of which poetry was considered the highest expression, constituted indisputable proof of genius. Because Europeans knew of no blacks in Africa who had distinguished themselves in written literature (Europeans ignored the fact that African literatures tended to be oral rather than written), slavery’s defenders claimed that blacks lacked the imagination, originality, and vision to qualify as fully human, the equals of whites. But because Wheatley wrote her poems, exploitative assumptions about the African’s “nature” would never again be so easy to maintain in European and American letters.
After only 4 years exposure to the English language, without any assistance from school education, and by only what she was taught in the Wheatley family, Phillis began to write poetry…at the age of 11 or 12, according to her master, John Wheatley of Boston.

y'all *really* think" that you're tricking somebody into something don't you? what you don't realize is that most women decide within the first 5 minutes of meeting a dude whether or not they'll sleep with him. all your "game" is merely entertainment. - H

  

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knumskul
Charter member
1038 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 11:48 AM

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15. "This should read:"
In response to Reply # 10


          

The mere fact of an African-born slave woman’s writing poetry in English, her adopted language, was stunning news to whites who encountered "Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral By Phillis Wheatley, of Boston, in New England" when it first appeared in London in September 1773.

that was the title. sorry if anyone got confused.

y'all *really* think" that you're tricking somebody into something don't you? what you don't realize is that most women decide within the first 5 minutes of meeting a dude whether or not they'll sleep with him. all your "game" is merely entertainment. - H

  

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standard deviant
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1206 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 07:04 AM

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4. "I love..."
In response to Reply # 0


          

This post makes the year immeasurably better. Thanks for all the work and the wealth of information.




"I've been very lonely in my isolated tower of indecipherable speech"--Being John Malkovich

"Killing fields need blood to graze the cash cow..."--Mos Def

"No matter how insane and dispicable you act, I can one up you, because I work for the government."--Million Dollar Hotel

"I'm not racist--I LOVE Hip-Hop."--DarkStar

"Ohhhh, I'll never be a Globetrotter. My life--and by extension everyone else's--is meaningless."--Bender

  

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ya Setshego
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Fri Feb-01-02 08:24 AM

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6. "Mary Mc Leod Bethune"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          





Mary McLeod Bethune was born near Mayesville, South Carolina. In 1885 she enrolled at Trinity Presbyterian Mission School. With the aid of her mentor Emma Jane Wilson, she moved on to Scotia Seminary in 1888, a missionary school in Concord, North Carolina. There she was given what was known as a head-heart-hand education, which emphasized not only academic but also religious and vocational training. Because her dream was to become a missionary to Africa, she entered the missionary training school now known as Moody Bible Institute. After a year of study, she applied for service but was rejected because Presbyterian policy did not permit African Americans to serve in Africa.

Following this rejection, Bethune began teaching, first in 1896 at Haines Institute in Augusta, Georgia, and a year later at the Presbyterians' Kendall Institute in Sumter, North Carolina. In 1900 Bethune moved to Palatka, Florida, where she established two schools. In 1904 she relocated to Daytona, Florida, and opened the Daytona Educational and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls. The Daytona Institute initially consisted of five African American girls in a rented house. Eventually the school expanded to include a farm, a high school, and a nursing school. After merging with Cookman Institute, the school became the coeducational Bethune-Cookman College in 1929 and reached the status of fully accredited college in 1943. Bethune's achievement as the school's founder and president won her in 1935 the prestigious Spingarn Medal, given by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP).

Through the Daytona Institute, Bethune proved her abilities not only as an educator but also as an organizer, as a fund-raiser, and as one adept at negotiating between black and white communities. She employed these skills as president and as founder of several black women's organizations, which culminated in her establishment of the National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) in 1935. By the end of her presidency in 1949, the NCNW had coordinated the activities of many black women's organizations, presenting a unified voice to the federal government to secure greater equity for African Americans in social welfare programs.

Bethune had significant influence in U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal government. From 1936 to 1945 she held the informal position of the federal administration's "race leader at large," and she was one of the influential black leaders, known as the Black Cabinet, who organized the Federal Council on Negro Affairs. Bethune became the Director of Negro Affairs for the National Youth Administration, a title she held from 1939 to 1943. This made her the highest-ranking black woman in government at that time. As director, she fought for racial equality in the distribution of funds to young people, and she secured state and local government positions for African Americans.

In her work Bethune emphasized an internationalism that advocated the unity of humanity. In the early 1940s, the U.S. House Committee on Un-American Activities labeled her a Communist, which damaged her reputation. Bethune's support for civil rights, however, was unfaltering. She participated in the New Negro Alliance's picket line in 1939, and she joined A. Philip Randolph in the March on Washington Movement in 1941. Bethune was honored with awards for her work as a civil rights and women's rights leader throughout her life.

First published: June 2, 2001



"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"'Cuz U answer the phone 'peace' that means U not a freak?"-The Questions(c) Common


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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spiritual_harvest
Member since May 28th 2002
6 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 09:15 AM

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7. "Mother Hale..."
In response to Reply # 0


          

Clara Hale...a Queen Mother who taught us about love, sacrifice, and commitment to the community.

Clara Hale was a rare individual who had left her loving imprint on the lives of thousands.
In 1940, Mrs. Clara Hale learned that she could become a foster mother. During the next 25 years, she became known as ‘Mother Hale’ to over 40 children.
As problems associated with drug abuse exploded in the Harlem community, Mrs. Hale's family implored her to take action. Within six months, she had 22 babies of heroin-addicted women in her five-room apartment. Soon, she had helped establish a home for infants addicted before birth. It was the first--and only known program--in the U.S. designed to deal with infants born addicted to illegal drugs.
In 1975, Hale House became the "Center for the Promotion of Human Potential," a licensed voluntary childcare agency. At that time, it was the only black voluntary agency in the country.
She also founded Homeward Bound to help mothers recovering from drug alcohol problems to re-enter society and assume their parental responsibilities.
"Mother" Hale had cared for over 500 children at Hale House. She was a nurturing, loving, comforting woman who genuinely cared about the future of these otherwise friendless children.
"You can, you know you can--I know you can!" were words spoken by a woman who has proven the endless capacity of the human spirit.
Mother Hale died in 1993. Women's International Center dedicated the Living Legacy Awards to the memory of the great Clara Hale in 1993, Lorraine Hale accepted our dedication to her magnificent mother.

Clara Hale helped children from everywhere and had love for babies and infants. She set a good influence for the children. In 1992, "Harlem lost and heaven gained an angel" when Mother Hale died.

  

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hopnva
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1527 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 10:44 AM

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8. "RE: Elbert R. Robinson"
In response to Reply # 7


          

invented the Electric Trolley which paved the way for the subway system.



Damn if I know?
"the ghetto code"

  

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el_rey
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5626 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 11:26 AM

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14. "Audre Lorde"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

"Your Silence Will Not Protect You"

Audrey Geraldine Lorde was born on February 18, 1934 in New York City. She decided to drop the "y" from the end of her name at a young age, setting a precedent in her life of self determination. She was the daughter of Caribbean immigrants who settled in Harlem. She graduated from Columbia University and Hunter College, where she later held the prestigious post of Thomas Hunter Chair of Literature. She was married for eight years in the 1960's, and had two children -- Elizabeth and Jonathan.

Lorde was a self described "Black lesbian, mother, warrior, poet". However, her life was one that could not be summed up in a phrase.

Audre Lorde the Poet

Lorde collected a host of awards and honors, including the Walt Whitman Citation of Merit, which conferred the mantle of New York State poet for 1991-93. In designating her New York State's Poet Laureate, the Governor, Mario Cuomo, said: "Her imagination is charged by a sharp sense of racial injustice and cruelty, of sexual prejudice . . . She cries out against it as the voice of indignant humanity. Audre Lorde is the voice of the eloquent outsider who speaks in a language that can reach and touch people everywhere."

Her first poem was published in Seventeen magazine while she was still in high school. The administration of the high school felt that her work was too romantic for publication in their literary journal. Lorde went on to publish over a dozen books on poetry, and six books of prose.

Audre Lorde the Teacher and Activist

Lorde worked as a librarian while refining her talents as a writer. In 1968, she accepted a teaching position at Tougaloo College in Jackson, Mississippi where the violence that greeted the civil rights movement was close at hand every night. This period cemented the bond between her artistic talents and her dedication to the struggle against injustice.

Lorde went on to provide avenues of expression to future generations of writers by co-founding the Kitchen Table: Women of Color Press. She was at the center of the movement to preserve and celebrate African American culture at a time when the destruction of these institutions was on the rise. Her dedication reached around the world when she formed the Sisterhood in Support of Sisters in South Africa. She was one of the featured speakers at the first national march for gay and lesbian liberation in DC in 1979. In 1989, she helped organize disaster relief efforts for St. Croix in the wake of Hurricane Hugo.

Audre Lorde the Warrior

Late in life, Audre Lorde was given the African name Gamba Adisa, meaning "Warrior: She Who Makes Her Meaning Clear". It is a name that applies to her whole life. Her struggle against opression on many fronts was expressed with a force and clarity that made her a respected voice for women, African Americans, and the Gay and Lesbian community.

Lorde's son Jonathan Rollins recalled the warrior spirit that his mother possesed by stating that not fighting was not an option -- "We could lose. But we couldn't not fight."

Audre Lorde the Quotable

"The quality of light by which we scrutinize our lives has direct bearing upon the product which we live, and upon the changes which we hope to bring about through those lives." ( Poetry Is Not A Luxury)

"When I dare to be powerful - to use my strength in the service of my vision, then it becomes less and less important whether I am afraid".

"I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood."

Audre Lorde the Survivor

Lorde bravely documented her 14-year battle against the cancer in "The Cancer Journals" and in her book of essays "A Burst of Light". In the latter she wrote: ''The struggle with cancer now informs all my days, but it is only another face of that continuing battle for self-determination and survival that black women fight daily, often in triumph.'' She struggled against disease and a medical establishment that was frequently indifferent to cultural differences and insensitive to women's health issues. She stood in defiance to societal rules that said that she should hide the fact that she had breast cancer.

Audre Lorde, died in St Croix, Virgin Islands, on November 17, 1992. Her spirit fights on.

Learn more about Audre Lorde

* Read her novel/memoir "Zami: A New Spelling of My Name", Crossings Press, Trumansburg, NY, 1982.
* See the film "A Litany for Survival: The Life and Work of Audre Lorde" by Ada Griffith and Michelle Parkerson, 1994.
* Read the award winning book "A Burst of Light", Firebrand Books, Ithica, NY, 1989.
* Visit her publisher's site : Firebrand Books.



love and respect,
El Rey

SUPPORT GOOD MUSIC:
http://www.mp3.com/Esthetics

"Yo he preferido hablar a cosas
imposibles, porque de lo posible se
sabe demasiado." -- Silvio Rodriguez

"if jesus was alive today
he'd be incarcerated
with the rest of the brothers
while uh
the devil would have a great
apartment
on the upper east side
be a guest v.j.
on total request live" - Me'Shell
(god.fear.money)

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
who are you









really

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 04:36 PM

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18. "I believe this."
In response to Reply # 14


  

          

>>"if jesus was alive today
>he'd be incarcerated
>with the rest of the brothers
>
>while uh
>the devil would have a great
>
>apartment
>on the upper east side
>be a guest v.j.
>on total request live" - Me'Shell
>
>(god.fear.money)


"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"'Cuz U answer the phone 'peace' that means U not a freak?"-The Questions(c) Common


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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el_rey
Charter member
5626 posts
Tue Feb-05-02 05:34 AM

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34. "she speaks the truth!"
In response to Reply # 18


  

          

love and respect,
El Rey

SUPPORT GOOD MUSIC:
http://www.mp3.com/Esthetics

"Yo he preferido hablar a cosas
imposibles, porque de lo posible se
sabe demasiado." -- Silvio Rodriguez

"if jesus was alive today
he'd be incarcerated
with the rest of the brothers
while uh
the devil would have a great
apartment
on the upper east side
be a guest v.j.
on total request live" - Me'Shell
(god.fear.money)

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~
who are you









really

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Tue Feb-05-02 01:43 PM

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37. "Yes,"
In response to Reply # 34


  

          

that usually is her tendency.




"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"'Cuz U answer the phone 'peace' that means U not a freak?"-The Questions(c) Common


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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sistasoul
Charter member
876 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 02:12 PM

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16. "RE: OkayBlackOurstoryMonth 2002"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Marcus Moziah Garvey was born in St. Ann's Bay, Jamaica, on Aug. 17, 1887, the youngest of 11 children of Sarah and Marcus Garvey. He attended local schools and at 14 became a printer's apprentice.

Garvey became devoted to improving conditions for black workers. In 1907 he led a printer's strike in Kingston, Jamaica. Later he toured Central America and South America to organize plantation laborers. In 1912 he went to London, England, where he met blacks from many nations and became fascinated by African history and culture.
Returning to Jamaica in 1914, Garvey established the Universal Negro Improvement and Conservation Association and African Communities League, usually called the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA). Its goals included the promotion of black solidarity, with a special concern for the welfare of African blacks. But the UNIA met apathy from black workers as well as active opposition from the lighter-skinned middle class who did not wish to be identified as blacks. Hoping for support in the United States, Garvey established a branch of the UNIA in New York City in 1917. He taught that blacks would be respected only when they were economically strong, and to that end he founded a newspaper, Negro World, as well as other black-owned businesses such as the Black Star Line, a steamship company. Garvey pledged to establish in Africa a black-governed nation.
With his rallying cry "Up you mighty race, you can accomplish what you will!" Garvey attracted thousands of black supporters.
He set a passionate example of "a proud black man, honored to be a black man, who would be nothing else in God's creation but a black man." But after 1920 he gradually declined as a popular leader. He was criticized as being a bombastic demagogue or at best a naive dreamer. Garvey-ites were refused permission to settle in the African state of Liberia. The Black Star Line failed from mismanagement, and Garvey was convicted of mail fraud and imprisoned in 1925.
Garvey was released from prison in 1927 but was deported to Jamaica. He worked both there and in London with some success to rekindle interest in the UNIA. A symbol of the determination of blacks to win respect and recognition, he said of himself, "I am only the forerunner of an awakened Africa that shall never go back to sleep."
Marcus Garvey died in London on June 10, 1940. In 1964 he was named Jamaica's first national hero and was reburied there.




*Thanks again to Solarus for starting this post. On a sidenote: I teach pre-school age kids, and I was trying to think of something fun and entertaining, yet educational that they could do for Black History month. So far, I haven't come up with too much. Except, i'm taking them to see an African dance troupe, but thats about it, and I had to BEG for that. I really want them to learn about the inumerable contributions that Africans have made to the world in which they live. But then again, they are only 4 and 5, so I have to make it fun. ANY suggestions at all would be so greatly appreciated

much love


~~~~~~welcome to my sig~~~~~~~

"Perilous to us all are the devices of an art deeper than we possess ourselves."- Gandalf, 'The Two Towers'

"...the doper that I get the more I'm feeling broke as shit..."- Dre 3000

  

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Mau777
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2780 posts
Fri Feb-01-02 02:39 PM

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17. "Joe Marshall and Margaret Norris"
In response to Reply # 0


          


Dr. Joseph E. Marshall, Jr. is the Executive Director and Co-founder of Omega Boys Club, a violence prevention organization that emphasizes academic achievement and non-involvement with drugs.Through this organization, founded in March of 1987, Marshall has helped send more than 180 young men and women to college supported by the Omega Boys Club Academic Scholarship Fund. To date 72 Omegas have graduated from college.

With a growing list of success stories, the Omega Boys Club continues to receive national acclaim. Marshall, staff and members of the club have been profiled in the New Yorker Magazine, People Magazine, the New York Times Magazine, the Los Angeles Times Magazine, Essence Magazine, CNN, the Disney Channel, CBS Evening News, The Today Show, McNeil Lehrer Report, the Oprah Show, B.E.T. Tonight and the VIBE Television Show.

In 1990, Marshall was honored at the White House for his success in fighting drugs and crime in his community. He is currently a Planning Board Member of the Surgeon General's Report on Youth Violence and he is a former member of the Harvard University School of Public Health, Advisory Board for the Community Violence Prevention. In March 1997, Marshall received a bi-partisan salute from the United States Congress when he was presented with the Freedom Works Award by House of Representatives Majority Leader, Richard K. Armey, Republican of Texas and seconded by California Democrats Ron Dellums and Nancy Pelosi.

Marshall is the recipient of many national awards including, the 2001 Oprah Winfrey "Use Your Life Award;" the 2001 California Broadcaster's Association Community Service Award for Excellence in radio programming; the 2000 Links National Service to Youth Award; the 1994 MacArthur Fellowship "Genius Award" from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; a 1994 Leadership Award from the Children's Defense Fund; and, the 1996 "Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Award from the National Education Association.

In April 1994, he, along with Denzel Washington, Quincy Jones, Spike Lee, Rev. Jesse Jackson, Robert Moses, Eddie Murphy and Benjamin Carson, M.D., received the Essence Award, honoring outstanding achievements by African American Men.

In addition to his work with Omega Boys Club, Marshall hosts the only nationally syndicated violence prevention call-in radio talk show in America, "Street Soldiers". The show allows youth to speak about pressing problems confronting their communities such as crime, gang and school violence, teenage pregnancy and drugs and receive practical solutions. The show has been hailed by Ken Auletta of New Yorker Magazine as "a model for how the entertainment industry can come to terms with violence."

Marshall is the author of the best-selling book Street Soldier, One Man's Struggle to Save a Generation, One Life at a Time, (Delacorte Press, May 1996) and he and the Club are the subject of a PBS documentary on violence prevention entitled Street Soldiers. He holds a dual Bachelors Degree in Political Science and Sociology from the University of San Francisco; a Master of Arts in Education from San Francisco State University; and, a Doctorate in Psychology from Berkeley's Wright Institute. Dr. Marshall is currently on leave from the San Francisco Unified School District where he was employed as a teacher and administrator for twenty-five years. For further information contact: Patti Colston (916) 444-2249.


.....Ms Norris was one of my freshman and sophmore teachers in highschool and she was definitely my favorite

http://www.street-soldiers.org/programs_bio3.htm

The full street solidiers sight is:

http://www.street-soldiers.org/


Both of these individuals have had a profound effect on my life as well as 1000's of others in the ghettos in San Francisco and Oakland.

Truth 2 U

---
If you release what is within u, what u release will save you. If you do not release what is within u, what u do not release will destroy u.

www.pitchblackgold.bandcamp.com

  

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spiritual_harvest
Member since May 28th 2002
6 posts
Sat Feb-02-02 07:11 AM

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19. "FRED HAMPTON, SR"
In response to Reply # 0


          

He taught us about true activism...

FRED HAMPTON was a high school student and a promising leader when he joined the Black Panther Party at the age of 19. His status as a leader grew very quickly. By the age of 20 he became the leader for the Chicago Chapter of the Black Panther Party. He was in involved in a lot of activities to improve the black community in Chicago. He maintained regular speaking engagements and organized weekly rallies at the Chicago federal building on behalf of the BPP. He worked with a free People's Clinic, taught political education classes every morning at 6am, and launched a community control of police project. Hampton was also instrumental in the BPP's Free Breakfast Program. Hampton had the charisma to excite crowds during rallies, he was suppose to be appointed to the Party's Central Committee. His position would have been Chief of Staff if he did not have an untimely death on the evening of December 4, 1969.

Fred's powerful speaking and organizing skills, made Fred Hampton a wanted man. The Federal Bureau of Investigation saw Fred Hampton as a threat to society that needed to be eliminated. They conspired with the Chicago Police Department (CPD) and William O'Neal to spy on Fred to give them information about his daily itinerary in order to have O'Neal's felony charges dropped. His job was to serve as a bodyguard of Fred and director of the Chapter's security. He was suppose to notify the FBI of the Panther's apartment floor plan and how many residents lived in the apartment. When the FBI got its information a raid was authorized by the state attorney Hanrahan. FBI special agents sent a memo to J. Edgar Hoover stating that "a positive course of action (was) being effected under the counterintelligence program." That evening Fred Hampton and several Party members including William O'Neal came home to the BPP Headquarters after a political education class. O'Neal volunteered to make the group dinner. He slipped a large dose of secobarbital in Fred's kool-aid and left the apartment around 1:30am, a little while later, Fred fell asleep. Around 4:30am on December 4, 1969 the heavily armed Chicago Police attacked the Panthers' apartment. They entered the apartment by kicking the front door down and then shooting Mark Clark pointblank in the chest. Clark was sleeping in the living room with a shotgun in his hand. His reflexes responded by firing one shot at the police before he died. That bullet was then discovered to be the only shot fired at the police by the Panthers. Their automatic gunfire entered through the walls of Fred and his pregnant girlfriend's room. Fred was shot in the shoulder. Then two officers entered the bedroom and shot Fred at pointblank in his head to make sure that he was dead, and no longer a so-called menace to society. It has been said that one officer stated, "he's good and dead now." The officers then dragged Fred's body out of his bedroom and again open fired on the members in the apartment.

Fred Hampton’s legacy of courage and activism is still alive. He once said, "You can kill a revolutionary, but you can't kill a revolution!"

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Sat Feb-02-02 10:58 AM

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20. "Langston Hughes"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 19:05:38 EST

Subject: Langston Hughes 100th Birthday








Today marks the 100th anniversary of Langston Hughes' birth, and the first
day that the Langston Hughes Black History Month stamps go on sale.


In honor of Hughes' birthday, I am sharing with you one of his poems. It is
as poignant as ever:


AMERICA


Little dark baby,

Little Jew baby,

Little outcast,

America is seeking the stars,

America is seeking tomorrow.

You are America.

I am America

America -- the dream,

America -- the vision

America -- the star-seeking I.

Out of yesterday

The chains of slavery;

Out of yesterday,

The ghettos of Europe;

Out of yesterday,

The poverty and pain of the old, old world,

The building and struggle of this new one,

We come

You and I,

Seeking the stars.

you and I,

You of the blue eyes

And the blond hair,

I of the dark eyes

And the crinkly hair.

You and I

Offering hands

Being brothers,

Being one,

Being America.

You and I.

And I?

Who am I?

You know me:

I am Crispus Attucks at the Boston Tea Party;

Jimmy Jones in the ranks of the last black troops

marching for democracy.

I am Sojourner Truth preaching and praying

for the goodness of this wide, wide land;

Today's black mother bearing tomorrow's America.

Who am I?

You know me,

Dream of my dreams,

I am America.

I am America seeking the stars.

America --

Hoping, praying,

Fighting, dreaming.

Knowing.

There are stains

On the beauty of my democracy,

I want to be clean.

I want to grovel

No longer in the mire.

I want to reach always

After the stars.

Who am I?

I am the ghetto child,

I am the dark baby,

I am you

And the blond tomorrow

And yet

I am my one sole self,

America seeking the stars.


From the Collected Poems of Langston Hughes

For more info about Karen Essex or Kleopatra,
please visit: <A HREF="http://www.karenessex.com">www.karenessex.com

****************************************************************






<This is my personal favorite poem by him>:

What happens to a dream deferred?

Does it dry up
like a raisin in the sun?

Or fester like a sore -
And then run?

…Maybe it just sags
like a heavy load.

Or does it explode?

This passage from "Harlem," a poem by Langston Hughes, has been described as a "virtual anthem of black America." As a poet, playwright, fiction writer, autobiographer, and anthologist, Hughes captured the moods and rhythms of the black communities he knew and loved - and translated those rhythms to the printed page. Hughes has been called "the literary explicator and interpreter of the social, cultural, spiritual, and emotional experiences of Black America." This grand description is accurate for the role his writings have played in 20th-century American literature.

Hughes was born in Joplin, Missouri, in 1902. His father, a lawyer frustrated by American racism, moved to Mexico when Hughes was a year old, and Hughes spent most of his childhood at his maternal grandmother's home in Lawrence, Kansas. His grandmother had been an activist for decades. Her first husband was killed at the slave rebellion at Harpers Ferry. Her second husband, Hughes's grandfather, was the brother of abolitionist John Mercer Langston and a participant in Kansas politics during Reconstruction. In his grandmother's home, Hughes was part of a close-knit black community, and he was always encouraged to read.

As a teenager, Hughes lived with his mother in Lincoln, Illinois, and Cleveland, Ohio. In Cleveland, he contributed to his high school literary magazine, was elected class poet his senior year, and graduated from high school in 1920. Hughes then spent a year in Mexico with his father. A poem he wrote on the train ride there, "The Negro Speaks of Rivers," was published in the June 1921 issue of The Crisis, the official publication of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). It is still perhaps his best-known poem, and it instantly confirmed his potential as a serious writer.

At his father's wish, Hughes enrolled at Columbia University in New York City in the fall of 1921, but he stayed only one year and spent most of his time in Harlem, in upper Manhattan. He took a series of jobs that included traveling down the west coast of Africa and then to Europe as a crew member on a merchant steamer. Hughes continued writing poetry during his travels, publishing much of it in the United States in black journals such as Crisis and the publication of the National Urban League, Opportunity: A Journal of Negro Life. By the time he returned to the United States in 1924, his reputation was already established. He won first prize in Opportunity's 1925 poetry contest for his poem "The Weary Blues," and the following year Alfred A. Knopf published The Weary Blues, Hughes's first volume of poetry.

By this time, Hughes was recognized as one of the leading figures in the constellation of black writers, artists, and musicians in New York who created the Harlem Renaissance, a cultural movement of the late 1920s and early 1930s. Hughes's poetry was greatly influenced by the people and culture around him. He admired the narrative style of white poets Carl Sandburg and Walt Whitman, but was also influenced by the poems of Paul Laurence Dunbar written in black dialect, and he incorporated the rhythms of black speech into many of his poems. Above all, Hughes was influenced by black music, especially jazz and blues.

Hughes's poems are often lyrical in the musical sense of the word - many of them could easily be set to a rhythmic beat. They also incorporate some of the same subject matter found in many blues lyrics, and portray nuances of black life - including sexuality - missing in earlier black literature. In a 1926 essay titled "The Negro Artist and the Racial Mountain," Hughes eloquently defended the honest representations of black culture and the use of jazz, dialect, and other influences from the black vernacular that had become a trademark in the work of many Harlem Renaissance writers. As Hughes put it, "We younger Negro artists who create now intend to express our individual dark-skinned selves without fear or shame."

Hughes enrolled in Lincoln University in Lincoln, Pennsylvania, in 1926, and graduated in 1929. The next year he published his first novel, Not Without Laughter. After an argument with a white patron who had been supporting him financially, Hughes spent time traveling, making extended visits to Haiti, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), and Carmel, California. He had begun publishing in the journal sponsored by the Communist Party, New Masses, even before he began to travel, and wrote some of his most politically radical poetry while in the USSR.

In Carmel, Hughes wrote his first collection of short stories, The Ways of White Folks (1934). He finished the decade with several successful plays, including Mulatto, loosely based on his grandfather's family. Mulatto opened on Broadway in 1935 and became the longest running Broadway play by an African American until A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry nearly 25 years later.

In 1940 Hughes published his first autobiography, The Big Sea. In it, he discusses his childhood, his estrangement from his father, and other personal topics, but readers especially value its insider's portrayal of the Harlem Renaissance. Two years later, he began writing a weekly column for the Chicago Defender that unexpectedly spawned his most popular literary character, Jesse B. Semple. "Simple," as he was called, was a fictional Harlem resident who had little education but many street-smart opinions on everything from World War II to American race relations. Simple became a representative for the black Everyman. Over the next 20 years, in addition to his column, Hughes published five books and an off-Broadway play that featured Simple, who has been called "one of the more original comic creations in American journalism."

Hughes also published more poetry and plays in the 1940s, and as lyricist for the 1947 Broadway musical Street Scene he earned enough money to buy the Harlem home where he lived for the rest of his life. In 1951 Hughes published one of his most important poetry collections, Montage of a Dream Deferred, which contained well-known works such as "Harlem" and "Dream Boogie." During the 1950s, Hughes published two more collections of short stories, another novel, several nonfiction works of children's literature, and his second autobiography, I Wonder as I Wander (1956)

In the 1960s Hughes wrote several successful plays featuring gospel music, including Black Nativity (1961), which remains a holiday tradition in several cities, and Jericho-Jim Crow (1964), based on the Civil Rights Movement. He also published anthologies of poetry, short stories, and humor, and the book-length poem Ask Your Mama (1962). When he died on May 22, 1967, he was at work on a new collection of poetry celebrating the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, which was published later that year as The Panther and the Lash.

As a writer, Hughes was prolific, both in the genres he covered and the amount he produced, and he became the first African American author to able to support themselves completely by their writing. But his work was remarkable for much more than its quantity. Hughes's writing captured the essence of black America in a way black Americans felt it had not been captured before. As biographer Arnold Rampersad said, "From the start, Hughes's art was responsive to the needs and emotions of the black world.… Arguably, Langston Hughes was black America's most original poet. Certainly he was black America's most representative writer and a significant figure in world literature in the 20th century."


"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"'Cuz U answer the phone 'peace' that means U not a freak?"-The Questions(c) Common


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Sat Feb-02-02 11:29 AM

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21. "From SUZAR:"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

www.okayplayer.com/dcforum/DCForumID1/5997.html#14




"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"'Cuz U answer the phone 'peace' that means U not a freak?"-The Questions(c) Common


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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kemetian
Charter member
1336 posts
Sat Feb-02-02 03:52 PM

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22. "Cothi-Barma"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

"...Boilat, who had studied in France and was well versed in European culture, observed the following:

'The Wolof's conversations revolve around useful topics; they always derive some benefit from them, such as we would derive from reading a good book, entering into a sort of dialogue with the author and deriving moral principles from it. If you imagine the Wolofs' meetings taking place in a room containing a rich library, where the president of the society would choose a book by a moralist and read it aloud to the gathering, each of whom would have the opportunity to express his reflections, you would have a true idea of their pastimes.'

In their discussions the Wolof would often refer to the sayings of various phiosophers. The most prominent of these was Cothi-Barma, who lived in Kayor during the reign of the great Amadi-Ngone and was credited with more than 5000 maxims. Like... Socrates ... who was condemned to death because of his teachings, Cothi-Barma incurred the death penalty by protesting the damel's destruction of a village whose inhabitants had offended him. The philosopher tricked Amadi-Ngone into thinking he had been killed, after which he went on teaching in secret. On learning that Cothi-Barma was still alive, the damel had him brought to the palace. Amadi-Ngone demanded to know what Cothi-Barma meant by a new saying that was being quoted throughout the kingdom:

"People do not gather under a barren tree"

Cothi-Barma fearlessly replied that the barren tree represented a ruler whose pride and cruelty cost him the love of his people; a just king, on the other hand, could always count on the affection and support of his subjects. According to the traditional tale, Amadi-Ngone was so impressed by Cothi-Barma's wisdom that he resolved to become a generous and merciful monarch."

Senegambia: Land of the Lion, by Philip Kaslow


Shemhotep
************
"If u want a butterfly u got to B a
butterfly" - India.Arie, Butterfly

"the wages of sin is death"
Romans ch.6 v.23

"If the essence of 'love'... is giving
selflessly or sacrificing for others,
how can it then be equated with
something that you can 'fall into or
out of'?" - Ra Un Nefer Amen,
Afrocentric Guide to a Spiritual Union

Kemetian
--------------------------------------
check it out:
www.natureworksforyou.co
m

"Pour libation for your father
and mother who rest in the
valley of the dead. God will
witness your action and
accept it. Do not forget to
do this

  

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okayheezy
Charter member
591 posts
Sun Feb-03-02 08:23 AM

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24. "RE: OkayBlackOurstoryMonth 2002"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Ourstory?

stop making up shit

Middle English histoire, from Old French, from Latin historia, from Greek histori, from historein, to inquire, from histr, learned man. See weid- in Indo-European Roots.
-----
don't make me knock your last tooth loose

http://www.trickology.com - the reason why your girl emails nude photos!

  

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Solarus
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3604 posts
Sun Feb-03-02 03:42 PM

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25. "delete this post"
In response to Reply # 24


  

          


____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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HotThyng76
Charter member
51232 posts
Sun Feb-03-02 05:29 PM

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27. "Naw."
In response to Reply # 25


  

          

"Ourstory"?

_______________________

  

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okayheezy
Charter member
591 posts
Thu Feb-07-02 04:15 AM

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44. "RE: delete this post"
In response to Reply # 25


          

delete deez nuts from ya mouth
-----
don't make me knock your last tooth loose

http://www.trickology.com - the reason why your girl emails nude photos!

  

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HotThyng76
Charter member
51232 posts
Sun Feb-03-02 05:28 PM

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26. "Thank you."
In response to Reply # 24


  

          


_______________________

  

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Solarus
Charter member
3604 posts
Sun Feb-03-02 05:42 PM

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28. "do better"
In response to Reply # 26


  

          


____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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HotThyng76
Charter member
51232 posts
Sun Feb-03-02 06:04 PM

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29. "YOU do better."
In response to Reply # 28


  

          

Seriously.

"ourstory"?

_______________________

  

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Solarus
Charter member
3604 posts
Sun Feb-03-02 06:31 PM

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30. "I will"
In response to Reply # 29


  

          

Akwaaba

Thanks for the words of encouragement.

SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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HotThyng76
Charter member
51232 posts
Sun Feb-03-02 07:08 PM

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31. "Great."
In response to Reply # 30


  

          


_______________________

  

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poetx
Charter member
58767 posts
Mon Feb-04-02 08:17 AM

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33. "up."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

glad to see this is an annual okevent, now. i'll add on later.



peace & blessings,

x.


peace & blessings,

x.

www.twitter.com/poetx

=========================================
I'm an advocate for working smarter, not harder. If you just
focus on working hard you end up making someone else rich and
not having much to show for it. (c) mad

  

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heru2002
Charter member
31 posts
Tue Feb-05-02 05:51 AM

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35. "RE: OkayBlackOurstoryMonth 2002"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Dr.Ivan Van Sertima

Ivan Van Sertima was born in Guyana, South America. He was educated at the School of Oriental and African Studies (London University) and the Rutgers Graduate School and holds degrees in African Studies and Anthropology. From 1957 - 1959 he served as a Press and broadcasting Officer in the Guyana Information Services. During the decade of the 1960's he broadcast weekly from Britain to Africa and the Caribbean.

He is a literary critic, a linguist, and an anthropologist and has made a name in all three fields.

As a literary critic, he is the author of Caribbean Writers, a collection of critical essays on the Caribbean novel. He is also the author of several major literary reviews published in Denmark, India, Britain and the United States. He was honored for his work in this field by being asked by the Nobel Committee of the Swedish Academy to nominate candidates for the Nobel Prize in Literature from 1976-1980. He has also been honored as an historian of world repute by being asked to join UNESCO's International Commission for Rewriting the Scientific and Cultural History of Mankind.

As a linguist, he is also the compiler of the Swahili Dictionary of Legal Terms, based on his field work in Tanzania, East Africa, in 1967.

He is the author of They Came Before Columbus: The African Presence in Ancient America, which was published by Random House in 1977 and is now in its twenty-first printing. It was published in French in 1981 and in the same year was awarded the Clarence L. Hotle Prize, a prize awarded every two years "for a work excellence in literature and the humanities relating to the cultural heritage of Africa and the African Diaspora"

Professor of African Studies at Rutgers University, Van Sertima was also visiting professor at Princeton University. He is also the editor of the Journal of African Civilizations, which he founded in 1979 and has published several major anthologies which influenced the development of a new multi-cultural curriculum in the U.S. These anthologies include Blacks in Science: Ancient and Modern: Black Women in Antiquity; Egypt Revisited; Egypt: Child of Africa; Nile Valley Civilizations; African Presence in the Art of the Americas; African Presence in Early Asia; African Presence in Early Europe; African Presence in Early America; Great African Thinkers; Great Black Leaders: Ancient and Modern and Golden Age of the Moor.

Professor Van Sertima has lectured at more than 100 universities in the U.S. and has also lectured in Canada, the Caribbean, South America and Europe. He defended his highly controversial thesis on the African presence in pre-Colombian America before the Smithsonian, which published his address in 1995. He also appeared before a Congressional Committee on July 7, 1987 to challenge the Columbus myth.



  

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Zesi
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24062 posts
Tue Feb-05-02 08:18 AM

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36. "chekyerinbox."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

*high five*

OkayNetworking: is your name Inita Jobb? If so, click this: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/okaynetworking

Interested in the okaysistas group? Looka heah: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/okaysistas

Like nifty art? Mira aqui: http://www.funkknots.com

  

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poetx
Charter member
58767 posts
Wed Feb-06-02 11:02 AM

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39. "hey, zesi,"
In response to Reply # 36


  

          

are the yahoo groups a listserv (ie, you can use it to send an e-mail to all group members?). if so, that's what i was looking for to setup the okayparents group.

peace & blessings,

x.


peace & blessings,

x.

www.twitter.com/poetx

=========================================
I'm an advocate for working smarter, not harder. If you just
focus on working hard you end up making someone else rich and
not having much to show for it. (c) mad

  

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knumskul
Charter member
1038 posts
Wed Feb-06-02 11:44 AM

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41. "i'm not zesi, but..."
In response to Reply # 39


          

yep. i do believe you can send msgs w/ yahoo to all members.

y'all *really* think" that you're tricking somebody into something don't you? what you don't realize is that most women decide within the first 5 minutes of meeting a dude whether or not they'll sleep with him. all your "game" is merely entertainment. - H

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Thu Feb-07-02 04:07 AM

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42. "Dorothy Height"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Dorothy Height

BY BONNIE NEWMAN STANLEY
TIMES-DISPATCH STAFF WRITER Feb 01, 2001



1999 PROFILES

Born in Richmond on March 24, 1912, Dorothy Irene Height has delivered a lifetime of service that few can match.


Height's mother, Fannie Burroughs Height, was a nurse. Her father, James Edward Height, was a building contractor.

The family moved to Rankin, Pa., near Pittsburgh. Growing up in Rankin, she served as a volunteer for groups inside and outside her church, activities she continued after her graduation from New York University in 1932. Working for the New York Welfare Department, Height helped deal with the Harlem riots of 1935 and became one of the young leaders of the National Youth Movement of the New Deal era.

LEARN MORE

Mary McLeod Bethune Black Americans of Achievement
by Malu Halasa

National Council of Negro Women website:
www.ncnw.com


During this period, she began to take on the critical civil rights issues of the time as she worked to prevent lynching, desegregate the armed forces, reform the criminal justice system and obtain full access to public transportation.

In November 1937, while escorting Eleanor Roosevelt into a meeting of the National Council of Negro Women, Height was noticed by the organization's founder, Mary McLeod Bethune. When Bethune called for help, Height joined the renowned organization that sought to give women full and equal employment, pay and education.

She was to become the NCNW's president 20 years later. She held the post four decades. During her presidency, Height led a crusade for justice for black women, working to strengthen the black family. Under her leadership, NCNW achieved tax-exempt status and developed several model national and community programs to address teen-age pregnancy, hunger in rural areas and other issues of racial justice.



Today, NCNW has more than 4 million members.

She also headed an effort to erect a statue of Bethune in a federal park and established the Bethune Museum and Archives for Black Women.

Height remained a key national figure in the YWCA and the Delta Sigma Theta sorority and for 12 years was director of the Center for Racial Justice in Washington.

She said she has always known the importance of service. She recalled that many people never knew she was not employed by NCNW, but simply a volunteer.

She points to her long tenure with the YWCA as being prompted by the organization's emphasis on integration and breaking down racial barriers as early as 1946, nearly a decade before the Supreme Court decision in the Brown vs. Board of Education case, ending public school segregation.


The Times of
Dorothy Height

1912
Height born

1932
Height earns B.A. at New York University

1935
Mary Mcleod Bethune founds NCNW


1956
VA Senator Harry Byrd coins phrase "massive resistance" in opposing integration

1957
Height becomes NCNW president



1989
Height awarded for Freedom Medal


Dorothy Height's name has never been one linked with radicalism or militancy. Nor has she ever gained the notoriety of civil rights leaders she marched with, including the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

But, as Height explains, it, the definition of militancy "is dealing directly with issues."

Height said she believes that volunteerism is getting stronger each day, and she encourages others to get involved.

"I think people need to realize that you can do more together than by yourself. The emphasis now is on an effort to connect people to work together in unity, which does not mean uniformity." Height has more than 20 honorary degrees, including ones from Harvard, Howard, Princeton and Tuskegee Institute. For her efforts on behalf of the less fortunate, President Reagan presented her the Citizens Medal Award for distinguished service in 1989, the year she also received the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Freedom Medal from the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute.

Height, 86, lives in Washington. She continues to serve as chair and president emerita of the NCNW.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
SOURCES : Dr.Dorothy Height; People Magazine, Oct.1998; Black Focus Newsweekly












"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"'Cuz U answer the phone 'peace' that means U not a freak?"-The Questions(c) Common


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Fri Feb-08-02 04:55 AM

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47. "I keep forgetting the theme is Education...."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          


MARVA N. COLLINS




Marva Collins grew up in Atmore, Alabama at a time when segregation was the rule. Black children were not permitted to use the public library, and her schools had few books. Nonetheless, her father, a successful businessman, instilled in her an awareness of the family's historical excellence and helped develop her strong desire for learning, achievement and independence. After graduating from Clark College in Atlanta, Georgia, she taught school in Alabama for two years. She moved to Chicago and, subsequently, taught in Chicago's public school system for fourteen years.


Her experiences in that system, coupled with her dissatisfaction with the quality of education that her two youngest children were receiving in prestigious private schools, led to her decision to open her own school on the second floor of her home. She took the $5,000 balance from her pension fund and began her educational program with an enrollment of her own two children and four other neighborhood youngsters


Thus, Westside Preparatory School was founded in 1975 in Garfield Park, a Chicago inner-city area. During the first year Marva took in learning disabled, problem children and even one child labeled border-line retarded. At the end of the first year every child scored at least five grades higher proving that the previous labels placed on these children were misguided.

Mrs. Collins' success with students labeled as "unteachable" by others led to profiles in Time and Newsweek magazines and television appearances on 60 Minutes and Good Morning America. Her life was the basis for a CBS Special Movie, The Marva Collins Story, with Cicely Tyson and Morgan Freeman. During his presidential term, Ronald Reagan offered her the post of Secretary of Education, but she declined in order to stay with her school.

In 1990 Mrs. Collins worked with over thirty public schools in Oklahoma. Harvard University tracked the progress of eight principals, four who accepted the model enthusiastically and four who did not aggressively promote it in their schools. The results after one year were astounding. The four schools who did the work had an average increase on the Iowa Standardized Test of over 172%. One school almost tripled their test scores. The four schools that did not do the work had an increase of only 10%.

In 1995, Charles Murray wrote a controversial book called The Bell Curve. In the book he mentioned that Marva Collins' work would have no long lasting effects on the children. 60 Minutes wanted to find out if this was true. So, they ran a second story showcasing the lives of the first thirty-three students who attended Westside Preparatory School. Statistically, one of the students should have been shot, two in jail and five on welfare. This was not the case. All thirty-three students, now adults, were leading very successful lives with a majority choosing teaching as a profession.

At the end of 1996, Marva decided to go back into the Chicago Public Schools to help three of the one hundred and nine schools placed on probation. She asked for the three lowest achieving schools, in the worst areas and with the lowest parental involvement. Similar to Oklahoma, two schools decided to implement the Marva Collins' methodology while one school decided not to implement the method. After just four months of working with the schools the Iowa Standardized Test was scheduled.

The two schools (Beidler Elementary and McNair Elementary) that did the work had an increase of over 85%, the other school had an increase of only 10%. Beidler and McNair were part of an elite group of four schools that doubled their test scores in at least one area. Since Beidler came off probation, the 1997/98 school year saw Marva Collins only working with McNair Elementary School. McNair posted the 10th highest increase in Math and the 6th highest increase in Reading in all of Chicago. 1998 saw the conclusion of the first year of the Marva Collins Preparatory School of Wisconsin located in Milwaukee and the beginning of her work with Wilson Elementary in Kenosha, Wisconsin.

Her vision, dedication to the education of children, and her achievements has earned her recognition from all over the world. She has received over 42 honorary doctoral degrees from many universities including Amherst College, Dartmouth, and Notre Dame. She is the recipient of the prestigious Jefferson Award for the Greatest Public Service Benefiting the Disadvantaged. In 1982 she was honored with Beverly Sills, Nancy Kissinger and Barbara Walters as one of the Legendary Women of the World.

She has received the Lincoln Award of Illinois for service in the state, and she has served on the board of directors of President Bush's Points of Light Foundation. She has trained Fortune 500 Corporations and over 100,000 teachers, principals and administrators in the Marva Collins' Methodology. She has also traveled to Africa with Young President's Organization teaching her methodology to business people worldwide. Mrs. Collins is a sought-after speaker whose schedule runs two to three years ahead.

The staff of the Marva Collins Preparatory School, now located on the south side of Chicago, includes her daughter Cynthia and son Patrick. Cynthia, who was five years old in 1975 when she began Westside Preparatory School, now is the headmistress of the Marva Collins Preparatory School. Patrick conducts teacher-training seminars in Chicago and around the country.

Mrs. Collins promotes excellence for the children in her charge. Effective teaching requires making daily deposits so that every child can become a lifetime achiever and they will never have to go through life faced with "insufficient funds". She tells her students that if you cannot keep one desk orderly, how can you possibly keep the world. She believes if we are not in control of small things; then the larger order of things will not become ours to command. Marva Collins believes every child is a winner until somewhere, someone teaches him or her too thoroughly that they are useless.













"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"'Cuz U answer the phone 'peace' that means U not a freak?"-The Questions(c) Common


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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Solarus
Charter member
3604 posts
Fri Feb-08-02 10:58 AM

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48. "Elders"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Akwaaba

Sometimes the bird looks so far behind itself that it doesn't see its own tail feathers. Sometimes we focus so much on our past that we forget to acknowledge those of us that have not made the death transition. Call out our elders who have been there to nurture us back to OUR WAY!!!!

SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Solarus
Charter member
3604 posts
Fri Feb-08-02 11:07 AM

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49. "CIBI"
In response to Reply # 48


  

          

Akwaaba

This is for the elders that organized in order to begin our back-forwards journey to REstructure our education.




Founded in 1972, the Council of Independent Black Institutions (CIBI) is an umbrella organization for independent Afrikan-centered schools and individuals who are advocates for Afrikan-centered education. CIBI's members are found throughout the United States, as well as in the United Kingdom and West Africa. Most of our institutional members are full-time Afrikan-centered independent schools. Our institutional membership also includes a number of part-time schools and supplementary schools. These schools enroll students at all levels from pre-kindergarten through secondary. The heaviest concentration, however, are at the elementary level.




Definition, Standards and Interpretations

• To define Afrikan-Centered Education
• To establish appropriate terminology, conditions, interpretations and standards consistent with the definition

Advocacy

• To vigorously promote the philosophy of Afrikan-centered education as defined by the organization
• To serve as the primary regional, national, and international spokesperson for the Afrikan- centered education movement and the institutions associated with that movement

Certification

• To establish Afrikan-centered standards and procedures for the certification of educational institutions, program, initiatives, organizations, etc.
• To establish Afrikan-centered standards and procedures for the certification of instructional and administrative personnel associated with educational institutions or programs

Curriculum Development and Standardization

• To develop and promote an Afrikan-centered curriculum philosophy
• To establish appropriate definitions and terminology associated with that philosophy
• To establish an Afrikan-centered curriculum design and methods for its implementation and evaluation
• To establish Afrikan-centered curricula for all ages (infancy through post-graduate levels) and in all subject areas
• To sponsor and/or facilitate the development of curriculum materials consistent with the design and content of Afrikan-centered curricula

Academic Performance Standards and Evaluation

• To establish academic performance standards consistent with the philosophy and design of the Afrikan-centered Curriculum
• To sponsor and/or facilitate the design of appropriate performance and diagnostic instruments, and procedures for the measurement of academic performance
• To establish standards and appropriate instruments for the evaluation of curriculum design and operations, instruction, and administration within Afrikan-centered educational institutions

National and International System Development and Coordination

• To facilitate the development and linkage of Afrikan-centered institutions world-wide through staff and student development programs, exchange programs, expositions, conventions, computer networking, bulk purchasing, joint investments and fundraising, etc.
• To establish designs, criteria, procedures, models, and necessary training\orientation programs that facilitate the development of viable institutions of Afrikan-centered education and culture.
• To serve as that administrative vehicle that coordinates the affairs of a national and international system of Afrikan-centered education.

SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Solarus
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Sun Feb-10-02 10:36 AM

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51. "Marimba Ani"
In response to Reply # 49


  

          

Akwaaba



Marimba Ani was brought to the Department of Africana and Puerto Rican Studies by Dr. John Henrik Clarke in 1974 as she was completing her Ph.D dissertation at the Graduate Faculty of New School University. She had worked as a field organizer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in Mississippi from 1963 to 1966, and had acted as Director of Freedom Registration for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party in 1964 which challenged the all-white Mississippi delegation to the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City that summer. Dr. Clarke became her Jegna ("warrior- teacher, intellectual father, ideological influence") as she moved back to New York and into graduate school. It was through his influence that she became committed to Pan Afrikan liberation.

After having traveled in Afrika, Marimba Ani (born "Dona Richards") began formal study of the nature of Afrikan Civilization, focusing on the "deep thought" which underlies its fundamental common cultural themes and the varying constructs of Afrikan social organization. She has done extensive work on Afrikan spiritual conceptions and systems. She is using her articulation of the Afrikan world view as a frame of reference from which to critique European cultural thought, and to construct paradigms for Pan-Afrikan reconstruction.

Marimba Ani has developed the concepts of Maafa, Asili, Utamawazo, and Utamaroho as part of the on-going process of Afrikan-centered reconceptualization in which several Pan-Afrikan scholars are involved. She has helped to initiate an intellectual and ideological movement, the purpose of which is to construct a theoretical framework which will allow people of Afrikan descent to explain the universe as it reflects their collective interests, values and vision.

Her most recent work has been the development of the MaatIMaafalSankofa paradigm as an analytical tool for understanding and explaining the Afrikan experience in the Diaspora and to suggest modalities for cultural reconstruction. Dr. Ani has been lecturing throughout the United States, the Caribbean and Afrika on this new theoretical construct which is part of her endeavor to develop a pragmatic Afrikan Cultural Science. This new science becomes the basis for the creation of Afrikan institutions and Nation-Building in the Diaspora.


Having taught at Hunter College for the past 25 years, Dr. Marimba Ani has had the opportunity to develop a number of courses on various aspects of the Pan-Afrikan experience. She teaches Afrikan Civilization, Afrikan Spirituality in the Diaspora, The Afrikan World View, Theories of White Racism, Afrikan Traditional Healing Systems, Nile Valley Civilization, Afrikan-centered theory, Women in Afrika, Men in the Afrikan Diaspora, and a number of other courses.
****

Currently Marimba Ani is a visiting professor at Morris Brown College in Atlanta, GA.

SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Solarus
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52. "Mwalimu Bomani Baruti"
In response to Reply # 48


  

          

Akwaaba

Larry D. Crawford (known known as Mwalimu Bomani Baruti) was an Assistant Professor of Sociology at Morehouse College from 1991-1999, and has been recognized for his dedication to students and community alike. He served as the advisor to numerous student organizations at Morehouse College as well as other institutions in the Atlanta University Center. Currently, Baruti along with his wife Yaa Baruti, founded an Afrikan-centered institution, that operates from their home.

I first heard the brother speak at the Morehouse's 1996 Freshman orientation. It was amazing to see the energy and strength contained within the short brown-skinned brother with glasses, dressed in all black was he talked about Afrikan manhood. Unfortunately, the general Morehouse administration is controlled by non-Afrikans and Baruti's message of Afrikan manhood eventually became too much for them to bear thus leading to his dismissal.

Also unfortunately I never had the chance to take the mandatory course that he taught while at Morehouse, called "Men in Society," but I eventually came to know him in my later years at Morehouse until now. I can definitely say that speaking to him is always an enlightening experience and motivating!

He is currently working on a three book series on Afrikan manhood. The first book of the series is in the end of its editorial phase and should be out by the summer.


SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Solarus
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3604 posts
Thu Feb-14-02 06:04 AM

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54. "Mwalimu Yaa Baruti"
In response to Reply # 48


  

          

Akwaaba

I can't forget about her. She is the sacred companion of Mwalimu Bomani Baruti. She was my all-time favorite teacher when I was at Morehouse College. I had her for World Literature and at the time knew her as Prof. Linda Lloyd-Crawford. In her class (which was all male) allowed us to discuss the literature and show us the utmost respect and effectively shut any of us down who would discuss respect her. Being that we discussed many heavily mysogynistic or at the least patriarchal works with young men who thought they knew everything , she showed her strength as an Afrikan woman and SHUT US DOWN without YELLING!

I soon realized that she is the FUEL and GUIDE to Mwalimu Bomani Baruti's FIRE!


SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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ya Setshego
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4259 posts
Mon Feb-18-02 06:56 AM

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59. "Now THAT"
In response to Reply # 54


  

          

is a beautiful thang.


>>she is
>the FUEL and GUIDE to
>Mwalimu Bomani Baruti's FIRE!


"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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Solarus
Charter member
3604 posts
Fri Feb-15-02 04:25 AM

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55. "Grandparents"
In response to Reply # 48


  

          

Akwaaba

Grandparents have traditionally been at the forefront of OUR education and development. Unfortunately this practice is not as prevalent as in the past but of the adoption of foreign ways. However OUR grandparents still holding it down for US!

Call'em out!

William & Miriam Lashley

Carlos (RIP) & Ernesta Barker

SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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ya Setshego
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4259 posts
Mon Feb-18-02 06:09 AM

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57. "RE: Grandparents"
In response to Reply # 55


  

          

>>OUR grandparents still
>holding it down for US!
>
>
>Call'em out!

GREATS: Moses and Mary Waters(RIP)
Robert Bradford and Lillian Stitch(RIP)
William Leighton and Holly Gas(RIP)

GRANDS: Florence Clara Louise(RIP) and Herman Wilson Bradford
Molly Harrison


"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Mon Feb-18-02 06:11 AM

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58. "On playing Kunta's"
In response to Reply # 55


  

          

grandmother in Roots, Elder Mother Maya Angelou stated,

"In the African tradition, Grandparents have TREMENDOUS power. It's delicious!"(smile)


"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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Ananse
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6103 posts
Tue Feb-19-02 07:58 AM

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60. "Grand-relatives"
In response to Reply # 58


  

          

grandparents: Jennie Jefferson
Samuel Jefferson
Prince Davis (the orginal)

Abraham Bines (RIP, I love you)
Julia Mae Bines

Great grand Uncle: Harry Myers who is 102 and still doing WELL. No health problems and is still driving.

<--- Peace to Bayete Ross-Smith.

  

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ya Setshego
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4259 posts
Tue Feb-19-02 02:39 PM

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61. "WOW."
In response to Reply # 60


  

          

I'm impressed You need to get Willard Scott to plug him on a.m. television!


>>Great grand Uncle: Harry Myers who
>is 102 and still doing
>WELL. No health problems and
>is still driving.


"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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Ananse
Charter member
6103 posts
Wed Feb-20-02 05:26 AM

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64. "Yeah"
In response to Reply # 61


  

          

he's great. he has a bit of a temper though. when he was younger he stuttered badly, so he always "had to defend" himself. the family is trying to get him to sit down and talk about the family history and all of the things he's seen.

<--- Peace to Bayete Ross-Smith.

  

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ya Setshego
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4259 posts
Mon Feb-18-02 06:05 AM

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56. "Judith Jamison"
In response to Reply # 48


  

          

Judith Jamison
Doctor of Fine Arts

Judith Jamison

In her autobiography Dancing Spirit (1993), Alvin Ailey American Dance Theatre Director Judith Jamison characterizes her career as "one long line that began when I was six years old." Since childhood she has explored and excelled in countless regions of the world of dance, both as a dancer herself and as a choreographer and leader of dance companies.


Judith Jamison
As an Ailey dancer for 15 years, she performed for worldwide audiences, communicating in this universal language, and acting as an ambassador for the United States as well as for the trademark Ailey style. In 1989, following Alvin Ailey's death, she returned to his group and has served since then as artistic director of "the Ailey."

Said Chancellor Penney: "Consummate dancer, both athlete and artist, our image of ourselves and of our country is different because of images you gave us in dance. You teach your dancers to look into themselves, and seeing them dance we see ourselves more fully."




"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

Printer-friendly copy | Top

    
ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Tue Feb-19-02 02:52 PM

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62. "Asa Hilliard"
In response to Reply # 48


  

          

Dr. Asa G. Hilliard, III

About Dr. Hilliard...

Dr. Asa G. Hilliard III is the Fuller E. Callaway Professor of Urban Education at Georgia State University, with joint appointments in the Department of Educational Policy Studies and the Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education. A teacher, psychologist, and historian, he began his career in the Denver Public Schools. He earned a B.A. in Educational Psychology, M.A. in Counseling, and Ed.D. in Educational Psychology from the University of Denver, where he also taught in the College of Education and in the Philosophy colloquium of the Centennial Scholars Honors Program.

Dr. Hilliard served on the faculty at San Francisco State University for eighteen years. During that time he was a Department Chair for two years, Dean of Education for eight years, and was consultant to the Peace Corps and Superintendent of Schools in Monrovia, Liberia for two years.

He has participated in the development of several national assessment systems, such as proficiency assessment for professional educators, and developmental assessments of young children and infants. He has been active in forensic psychology, serving as an expert witness on the winning side in several landmark federal cases on test validity and bias.

Dr. Hilliard is a founding member of the Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations and serves as its first Vice President. He is the co-developer of a popular educational television series, Free Your Mind, Return To The Source: African Origins, as well as having produced videotapes and educational materials on African History through his production company, Waset Education Productions.

Dr. Hilliard has written numerous technical papers, articles, and books on testing, Ancient African History, teaching strategies, public policy, cultural styles, and child growth and development. In addition, he has consulted with many of the leading school districts, universities, government agencies, and private corporations on valid assessment, curriculum equity nd teacher training. Several of his programs in pluralistic curriculum, assessment, and valid eaching have become national models. He has also been the recipient of numerous honors and awards.

WORKS BY DR. ASA GRANT HILLIARD III
Compiled by RUNOKO RASHIDI

Hilliard, Asa G. "The Egyptian Mystery System, Greek Philosophy and Dr. George G.M. James." Uraeus 1, No. 2 (1978): 46-48
Hilliard, Asa G. Free Your Mind, Return to the Source: The African Origin of Civilization. San Francisco: Urban Institute for Human Services, 1978.

Hilliard, Asa G. "Basic Family Bibliography on African and African-American History and Culture." Return to the Source 1, No. 4 (1982): 13.

Hilliard, Asa G. "Kemetic Concepts in Education." Nile Valley Civilizations: Proceedings of the Nile Valley Conference, Atlanta, Sept. 26-30. Edited by Ivan Van Sertima. New Brunswick: Journal of African Civilizations, 1984: 153-62.

Hilliard, Asa G. Afterword to the Wonderful Ethiopians of the Ancient Cushite Empire, by Drusilla Dunjee Houston. Baltimore: Black Classic Press, 1985.

Hilliard, Asa G. "Blacks in Antiquity: A Review." African Presence in Early Europe. Edited by Ivan Van Sertima. New Brunswick: Journal of African Civilizations, 1985: 90-95.

Hilliard, Asa G. Introduction to Stolen Legacy, by George G.M. James. San Francisco: Julian Richardson Associates, 1985.

Hilliard, Asa G. Foreword to Golden Names for a Golden People: African and Arabic Names, by Nia Damali. Atlanta: Blackwood Press, 1986.

Hilliard, Asa G. "Pedagogy in Ancient Kemet." Kemet and the African Worldview: Research, Rescue and Restoration. Edited by Maulana Karenga and Jacob H. Carruthers. Los Angeles: University of Sankore Press, 1986: 131-50.

Hilliard, Asa G. The Cultural Unity of Black Africa: The Domains of Patriarchy and of Matriarchy in Classical Antiquity." Great African Thinkers. Vol. 1, Cheikh Anta Diop. Edited by Ivan Van Sertima and Larry Obadele Williams. New Brunswick: Journal of African Civilizations, 1986: 102-109.

Hilliard, Asa G. Introduction to From the Browder File, by Anthony T. Browder. Washington, D.C.: Institute of Karmic Guidance, 1989.

Hilliard, Asa G. "Kemetic (Egyptian) Historical Revision: Implications for Cross Cultural Evaluation and Research in Education." Evaluation Practice 10, No. 2 (1989): 7-23.

Hilliard, Asa. G. "Waset, The Eye of Ra and the Abode of Maat: The Pinnacle of Black Leadership in the Ancient World." Egypt Revisited. Rev. ed. Edited by Ivan Van Sertima. New Brunswick: Journal of African Civilizations, 1989: 211-38.

Hilliard, Asa G. "Ancient Africa's Contribution to Science and Technology." NSBE: National Society of Black Engineers Magazine 1, No. 2 (1990): 72-75.

Hilliard, Asa G. Foreword to Kemet and Other Ancient African Civilizations: Selected References, compiled by Vivian Verdell Gordon. Chicago: Third World Press, 1991.

Hilliard, Asa G. "The Meaning of KMT (Ancient Egyptian) History for Contemporary African-American Experience, Part II" Color 1, No. 2 (1991): 10-13.

Hilliard, Asa G. A Selected Bibliography (Classified) and Outline on African-American History from Ancient Times to the Present: A Resource Packet. Rev. ed. Atlanta: Hilliard, 1991.

Hilliard, Asa G. "The Meaning of KMT (Ancient Egyptian) History for Contemporary African-American Experience." Phylon 49, Nos. 1-2 (1992): 10-22.

Hilliard, Asa G. Bringing Maat, Destroying Isfet: The African and African Diasporan Presence in the Study of Ancient Kmt. Atlanta: Hilliard, 1993.

Hilliard, Asa G. Fifty Plus Essential References on the History of African People. Baltimore: Black Classic Press, 1993.

Hilliard, Asa G. "Bringing Maat, Destroying Isfet: The African and African Diasporan Presence in the Study of Ancient Kmt." Egypt: Child of Africa. Edited by Ivan Van Sertima. New Brunswick: Journal of African Civilizations, 1994: 127-47.

Hilliard, Asa G. The Maroon Within Us. Baltimore: Black Classic Press, 1994.

Hilliard, Asa G. SBA: The Reawakening of the African Mind. Foreword by Wade W. Nobles. Gainesville: Makare, 1997.


WORKS BY ASA G. HILLIARD IN COLLABORATION WITH OTHERS


Hilliard, Asa G., Larry Obadele Williams, Nancy Harris, and Charlyn Harper-Bolton, comps. From Ancient Africa to African-Americans Today. Portland: Portland Public Schools, 1983.

Hilliard, Asa G., Larry Obadele Williams, and Nia Damali, eds. The Teachings of Ptahhotep: The Oldest Book in the World. Atlanta: Blackwood, 1987.

Hilliard, Asa G., Lucretia Payton-Stewart, and Larry Obadele Williams, eds. Infusion of African and African-American Content in the School Curriculum: Proceedings of the First National Conference, October 1989. Morriston: Aaron Press, 1990.

Hilliard, Asa G., and Larry Obadele Williams. The Struggle to Bring True African History Into Being. Los Angeles: Association for the Study of Classical African Civilizations, 1992.





"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

Printer-friendly copy | Top

    
ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Thu Feb-21-02 06:23 AM

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69. "John Hope Franklin"
In response to Reply # 48


  

          

John Hope Franklin
John Hope Franklin is the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of History, and for seven years was Professor of Legal History in the Law School at Duke University. He is a native of Oklahoma and a graduate of Fisk University. He received the A.M. and Ph.D. degrees in history from Harvard University. He has taught at a number of institutions, including Fisk University, St. Augustine's College, North Carolina Central University, and Howard University. In 1956 he went to Brooklyn College as Chairman of the Department of History; and in 1964, he joined the faculty of the University of Chicago, serving as Chairman of the Department of History from 1967 to 1970. At Chicago, he was the John Matthews Manly Distinguished Service Professor from 1969 to 1982, when he became Professor Emeritus.

Professor Franklin's numerous publications include The Emancipation Proclamation, The Militant South, The Free Negro in North Carolina, Reconstruction After the Civil War, and A Southern Odyssey: Travelers in the Ante-bellum North. Perhaps his best known book is From Slavery to Freedom: A History of African-Americans, now in its seventh edition. His Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities for 1976 was published in 1985 and received the Clarence L. Holte Literary Prize for that year. In 1990, a collection of essays covering a teaching and writing career of fifty years, was published under the title, Race and History: Selected Essays, 1938-1988. In 1993, he published The Color Line: Legacy for the Twenty-first Century. Professor Franklin's most recent book, My Life and an Era: The Autobiography of Buck Colbert Franklin, is an autobiography of his father that he edited with his son, John Whittington Franklin. His current research deals with "Dissidents on the Plantation: Runaway Slaves."

Professor Franklin has been active in numerous professional and education organizations. For many years he has served on the editorial board of the Journal of Negro History. He has also served as President of the following organizations: The American Studies Association (1967), the Southern Historical Association (1970), the United Chapters of Phi Beta Kappa (1973-76), the Organization of American Historians (1975), and the American Historical Association (1979). He has been a member of the Board of Trustees of Fisk University, the Chicago Public Library, and the Chicago Symphony Orchestra Association.

Professor Franklin has served on many national commissions and delegations, including the National Council on the Humanities, from which he resigned in 1979, when the President appointed him to the Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy. He has also served on the President's Advisory Commission on Ambassadorial Appointments. In September and October of 1980, he was a United States delegate to the 21st General Conference of UNESCO. Among many other foreign assignments, Dr. Franklin has served as Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at Cambridge University, Consultant on American Education in the Soviet Union, Fulbright Professor in Australia, and Lecturer in American History in the People's Republic of China. Currently, Professor Franklin serves as chairman of the advisory board for One America: The President's Initiative on Race.

Professor Franklin has been the recipient of many honors. In 1978, Who's Who in America selected Dr. Franklin as one of eight Americans who has made significant contributions to society. In the same year, he was elected to the Oklahoma Hall of Fame. He also received the Jefferson Medal for 1984, awarded by the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education. In 1989, he was the first recipient of the Cleanth Brooks Medal of the Fellowship of Southern Writers, and in 1990 received the Encyclopedia Britannica Gold Medal for the Dissemination of Knowledge. In 1993, Dr. Franklin received the Charles Frankel Prize for contributions to the humanities, and in 1994, the Cosmos Club Award and the Trumpet Award from Turner Broadcasting Corporation. In 1995, he received the first W.E.B. DuBois Award from the Fisk University Alumni Association, the Organization of American Historians' Award for Outstanding Achievement, the Alpha Phi Alpha Award of Merit, the NAACP's Spingarn Medal, and the Presidential Medal of Freedom. In 1996, Professor Franklin was elected to the Oklahoma Historians Hall of Frame and in 1997 he received the Peggy V. Helmerich Distinguished Author Award. In addition to his many awards, Dr. Franklin has received honorary degrees from more than one hundred colleges and universities.

Professor Franklin has been extensively written about in various articles and books. Most recently he was the subject of the film First Person Singular: John Hope Franklin. Produced by Lives and Legacies Films, the documentary was featured on PBS in June 1997.






"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Sat Feb-23-02 09:35 AM

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71. "Frances Cress WElsing, M.D."
In response to Reply # 48


  

          

Dr. Frances Cress Welsing
Author of The Isis Papers and creator of the Cress-Welsing theory analyzing the nature of white supremacy

Born March 18, 1935, in Chicago, IL.

Author, psychiatrist. Cook County Hospital, intern, 1962-63; St. Elizabeth Hospital, resident in general psychiatry, 1963-66; Children's Hospital, fellowship child psychiatry, 1966-68; private practice in general psychiatry, Washington, DC, 1966--, and general and child psychiatry, Washington, DC, 1968--; Howard University College of Medicine, assistant professor of pediatrics, 1968-75; Hillcrest Children's Center, clinical director, 1975-76; affiliated with Paul Robeson School for Growth and Development, North Community Mental Health Center, Washington, DC, 1976-90. Has appeared on numerous television and radio shows; lecturer.

National Medicine Association (section on psychiatry and behavioral sciences), American Medical Association, American Psychiatric Association.



The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors
(Click book or title to order on-line)

Publisher: Third World Press
Date Published: November 1990
Format: Trade Paper

Preface

We now are nearing the final decade of the 20th century. Recently, there has been an unraveling and an analysis of the core issue of the first global power sysem of mass oppression-- the power system of racism (white supremacy). One the collective victim (non-white population) understands this fundamental issue, the ultimate organizing of all of the appropriate behaviors necessary to neutralize the great injustice of the white supremacy power system will only be a matter of time. The length of time required to neutralize global white supremacy will be inversely proportional to 1) the level of understanding of the phenomenon; plus 2) the evolution of self- and group-respect, the will, determination and discipline to practice the appropriate counter-racist behaviors--on the part of the non-white victims of white supremacy."



"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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ya Setshego
Charter member
4259 posts
Mon Feb-25-02 01:00 PM

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72. "Ashra and Merira Kwesi"
In response to Reply # 48


  

          

http://www.seemeonline.com/kemetnu.html


"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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Ts_Aura9

Fri Feb-08-02 11:15 AM

  
50. "RE: OkayBlackOurstoryMonth 2002"
In response to Reply # 0


          

.

  

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Solarus
Charter member
3604 posts
Thu Feb-21-02 06:10 AM

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65. "Afrikan Pedagogy"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Akwaaba

Pedagogy is defined as the "art, science, or profession of teaching." Teaching IS a science and should be approached in such a manner. The underlying goal of education is to maintain a systematic perpetuation of a given society. This being the case, the pedagogy of a given people reflect the values, goals, and vantage points of the said group. Thus is WE are to discuss OURstory, a serious discussion of OUR pedagogy in the past, present and future is necessary for its perpetuation.

Some thing change. Some things stay the same. However they all MOVE. Keep it movin...


SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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ya Setshego
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4259 posts
Thu Feb-21-02 06:15 AM

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66. "I'm not sure"
In response to Reply # 65


  

          

where you are going w/ this. State something else to initiate the discussion, and we'll follow your lead.


"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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Solarus
Charter member
3604 posts
Thu Feb-21-02 06:18 AM

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67. "KMT"
In response to Reply # 65


  

          

Akwaaba

KMT is a land of wonders and even today we still benefit from its teaching. Pedagogy is also an area that KMT offers one of its greatest lessons.

***
From SBA: The Reawakening of the AFrican Mind by Asa Hilliard, III

The first teaching of Ptahhotep is a message about pedagogy. It speaks to the matter of arrogance as an impediment to wise perception. The lowly maid at the grindstone, the woman in poverty, may be richer in godd speech (mdw nfr) than one who possesses much information or knowledge. The learner/listener is told to consult with both the ignorant and the wise, for two reasons. On the one hand, the person who may not have specific information may well be the source of good speech. On the other hand,even the most informed and insightful heare/listener will never reach the limits of her specialty and may grow by listening to anyone--including those who are less informed. Thus, Ptahhotep teaches teachers and lerner/listeners to do the following.

1.Subdue pride, which blinds or clouds perception. (PReventative.)
2. Subdue arrogance, which also blinds or clouds perception. (Preventative.)
3. Aspire to perfection. (Corrective, creative.)
4. Be open to all. (Corrective, creative.)

In the next three teachings, Ptahhotep calls for self control. He suggests that self control is essential even in the face of provocation from superiors, equals or those who have less power. He counsels silence in the face of foolish conflicet. The superior, equal, or one with less power who "spouts ISfet" (evile or disordered speech) will expose herself. There is no need to confront them--not even to satisfy one's passion or ego needs.

In teaching number 12, Ptahhotep says that a wise man will raise a child who is pleasing to God, just as Ptahhotep himself live and teaches to please God. In this teaching, Ptahhotep also offers advice on discipline, both preventative and corrective.

1. Provide for the hearer/listener.
2/ Love your "son" )student).
3. Punish disobedience.
4. Punish Isfet (disordered or bad speech).

Ptahhotep tells us not to be impulsive. He says that we must study before speaking. Speak only when you know something. Be gentle and non-provocative in your speech. Above all, speak MAAT (Truth). To recapitulate, Ptahhotep suggests that people should:
1. Be deliberate and thoughtful, reflecive.
2. KNOW FIRST, THEN SPEAK.
3. Unse non-provocative speech.
4. Speak MAAT (Truth).

Ptahhotep praises intrinsic motivation. "Do not disturb a great man or distract his attention when he is occupied, trying to understand his task. When he is thus occupied, he strips his body through the love of what he does. Love for the work they do brings men closer to God". Surely a good teacher wil try to engage a learner/listener in work that is compelling to the learner/listener. THis eliminate the need for coercive "displine."

In the final sumary, after all of the 37 teachings have been presented, Ptahhotep makes some of his most profound points. He again stresses that a person should be taught to "teach to posterity." When taught to posterity, hearers/listeners who hear the teachings will become master hearers." THen hearer/listeners who hear the teachings will become "master hearers." Think of it: the criterion for master hearer is the understanding of the message beyond the obvious, the temporal, the trivial. The master hearer perceives the message that speaks to posterity! So both the earlier aim of speaking to posterity, and hearing that special message, a fifth aim, are aims of education.

****

For more on Ptahhotep:



Teachings of Ptahhotep

SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Solarus
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3604 posts
Thu Feb-21-02 06:18 AM

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68. "Also"
In response to Reply # 67


  

          


____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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360sunsumyea
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Tue Feb-26-02 06:19 AM

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74. "tight..."
In response to Reply # 67


          

1.Subdue pride, which blinds or clouds perception. (PReventative.)
2. Subdue arrogance, which also blinds or clouds perception. (Preventative.)
3. Aspire to perfection. (Corrective, creative.)
4. Be open to all. (Corrective, creative.)

i'll have to read more on his teachings because i have been thinking a lot about speech and effectiveness lately.

**********THE SIG**********

"Until you're truly ready to say fuck your fear, you are not alive..."
-Cee Lo 'Rollin'

"Some people hear their own inner voices with great clearness, and they live by what they hear. Such people become crazy or they become legends."
-One Stab 'Legends of the Fall'

  

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Solarus
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Wed Feb-27-02 04:57 AM

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76. "Shona"
In response to Reply # 65


  

          

Akwaaba

The traditional Shona society of present-day Zimbabwe were primarily an agriculturally based society with a de-centralized political structure where the autonomous villages co-existed with one another to create a larger Shona nation. The traditional Shona education consisted of many elements that could certainly be useful in the education of AFrikan children, OUR way.


Shona children development various mental skills such as reasoning, critical thinking, creative thinking and many other types of higher-order thinking skills. From the ages ages 6 to 8 children regularly listen proverbs and stories from their elders (especially grandparents) and are often asked to explain their meanings. Not only does this reinforce comprehension and critical thinking but the moral codes of the community are reinforced also. Then children are required to solve puzzles given through certain tasks or stories told by elders.

True story: One of my graduate school professors, gave my class brainteasers to increase our understanding of "logic." I found out later when reading one a book of Afrikan folktales that one of the brainteasers used was just an American translation, in his it involved a dog cat and mouse and in the Afrikan (Kongo and Shona version <- I think it maybe a common teaser amongst the Bantu-speakers and certain West Afrikans as I have even seen an Igbo version), it involved a goat,frog? and yam.

Then the games played by Shona youth also stimulate creativity. Games and play have often been cited by scientist of diverse fields to be the number one learning tool of many species. Shona games not only stimulate creative thinking but also physical abilities and prowess and social adjustment. "Playing house" is a popular game amongst younger Shona children and it serves to instill the roles that will be played by the children as adults.

Imitation and role-playing of adult roles is very important of the learning process of the Shona child. Boys learn from their fathers on how to be men both morally and socially and vice versa for the girls. Both sexes learn during the toddler stages general mores and taboos from their grandparents but when they get older the parents and other younger elders play a more prominent role in the child's development. Boys learn how to farm, the quality of wood, how to build structures, animal husbandry etc. The boy learns through experience with farming his own small plot of land and one animal. The girls learn cooking skills, how to maintain a house, and how to raise children by caring for younger siblings or other children.

Both sexes learn about the specific qualities of the land and nature, such as plant life and animal life. They also learn about various domestic animals and how to feed rear and care for them. Furthermore they learn which animals are dangerous and which ones are not.


SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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Solarus
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Fri Mar-01-02 04:33 AM

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78. "Igbo"
In response to Reply # 65


  

          

Akwaaba

From SBA (Hilliard's Notation of his Interview with Professor Umeh a traditional pries/healer of the Igbo from Nigeria)

REadiness Test
According to Umeh, one formal, early stage for education and socialization begins with a "intelligence test." "We might put two kinds of bread in a holde for the child and wait to see if the child chooses the nourishing bread over the bread that is no good." This tells us if the child has matured to the point where its attention can be focused on more serious things in a formal way.It should be noted that Umeh indicated waht virtually all African educators that I have met indicate. That is, the expectation that all children would begin and complete the education and socialization process, at least up to a basic "secondary" level. Such an education enables the ethnic group to meet the requirements for survival and enhancement, since it is a collective society.

Self Control
...To him, self control was not a knne-jerk response to coercion. It is an intellectual and spiritual process which reflects the commitment of the student to learn sufficiently which reflects the commitment of the student to learn sufficiently to engage in the behaviors and the focused thought that will yield results. In other words, the learner/listener does not think or act to avoid punishment so much as to gain knowledge and insight. Umeh's self control really refers to intrinsic rather that extrinsic initiatives.

Symbols
Umeh emphasized the central role played by symbols in the education/socialization process. The symbol is the icon, of course, that carries many layers and levels of meaning. African students are trained from the beginning to expect layer upon layer of meaning in the things that are presented. In a way, dealing with symbols sets up students to be continual probers who search for deeper meaning. Symbols also emphasize analogies. Analogies are themselves preparation for approaches to systematic, scientific investigation. The concrete thing, the self or some object, is simply the sign, but a symobl contains many rich possibilities that are severely limited by sign-thinking.

Nature Teaches
Umeh discusses the power of nature to teach. His specific reference is to animals. He explains the way that he learned certain things through longtime, systematic observation of birds that were helpful in developing healing practices- in this case, specific therapies for conjunctivitis. By observing the preferences of birds for certain plants or herbs, and by noting the use that they make of them, one discovers that objects that have medicinal purpose for humans. Umeh mentioned that this was a source of information for his finding of medication for conjunctivitis. However, it was not merely a bird or animal, but Nature itself that was in a constant process of revelation. The learner who has self control, who can forget self, and who can reason analogically, will be able to use the symbols of Nature to "discover" wonders upon wonders.

Foolishness
Umeh speaks about one of the major concerns of those who are in education and socialization- the quest to eliminate foolishness. I asked him what he meant by "foolsih. He said, well, for example, if someone eats garbafe, that is foolish. If someone goes out into the elements on a cold or raingy day with no clothes on, that is foolish. It is foolishness that keeps the child from learning or that keeps anyone from learning... This concept of the role of foolishness is almost universal among Africans. It is equal to and maybe greater than the Western preoccupation with mental capacity. African sassume that people have the mental capacity to achieve, but they are concerned about the "software" that allows brilliant people to misuse the capacity.

Dreams are Real
One last point made by Umeh is that healers/teachers regard dreams as real. Not only as real, but as most real. He noted that in the West, reason is seen as real. While he states that reason is important he stresses that it is merely a tool...To Umeh, anyone whole relies solely on reason is a foolish person.

Dreams, on the other hand, are those things without boundaries, those things that enable a free combination of things, old, new and not yet imagined. Dreams are the evolution of hypothese, access to insights that may be subliminal or even unconscious. For Umeh, dreams are our fleeting attempts to make contact with the divin, and maybe a record or our having done so.




SE wo werE fi na wosankofa a yenkyi.

Akoneaba ne agoro
solarICE

"So many of those who consider themselves Afrikan centered spend so much time on themselves that they forget that the primary role of the adult in our tradition was to raise the children to improve the society for their children."- Mwalimu Baruti

***Daily Affirmation***

i must be a warrior. i must be an Afrikan father. i must be self-full. i must challenge myself daily to grow, to love my people in and through action. To reflect that love at all times. To be optimistic. To know that victory is in front of US.

____________________________
"the real pyramids were built with such precision that you can't slide a piece of paper between two 4,000 lb stones, and have shafts perfectly aligned so that you can see a tiny aperture through dozens of these mammoth blocks

  

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poetx
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58767 posts
Thu Feb-21-02 12:22 PM

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70. "UP. n/m"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          


peace & blessings,

x.

www.twitter.com/poetx

=========================================
I'm an advocate for working smarter, not harder. If you just
focus on working hard you end up making someone else rich and
not having much to show for it. (c) mad

  

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jenNjuice
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Tue Feb-26-02 05:32 AM

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73. "RE: NAMES"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Den to - The Naming Ceremony of the Akan
by Kwesi Ra Nehem Ptah Akan


The name is an essential component of the spiritual anatomy of a human being. Thus, from time immemorial Africans have said in respect to the sacredness of the name: "Truly, without a name the human being does not exist."

The name is a group of sounds - sounds/vibrations grouped together in a unique way. Power from the sound/vibration of a properly given name moves throughout the spirit of the person when heard or spoken. The spirit responds to this power, stirring within the person an awareness of their unique purpose in life and of the potential they possess to carry out that purpose. As the purpose of one's life is given to him or her by The Creator before birth, we recognize our unique purpose, our destiny, our function in Creation, to be a divine purpose, a divine destiny, a divine function we are to execute in this world. Thus, the name, the power-carrying indicator of our divine destiny, has always been and continues to be most sacred to us. It is within this context that the naming ceremonies of African people must be viewed. The den to (Naming Rite) of the Akan people of West Africa is expressive of these principles.

The Akan (Ah-khan) people live primarily in the region of West Africa which includes the sacred waters of Lake Bosom Twe as well as the sacred rivers Tano, Pra, Bia and Afram. The ancestry of the Akan is an ancient ancestry stretching back to the ancient civilizations of Keneset (Nubia/Ethiopia), Kemet (Egypt) and beyond. For thousands of years up to this day, the Akan have preserved their culture, a culture which has survived various challenges including forced migrations and the slave trade.

Den to

After a baby is born he or she is kept indoors for eight days. The eighth day is the day of the naming ceremony, den to. The newborn receives two names. The first name received is called the "kra den" or "soul name", and is determined by the day of the week that the child was born. This is because Nyame (oun-yah-may , God in Akan culture) placed seven of His children over the seven days of the week. Each one of these seven divinities (Gods/Goddesses) carry different spiritual qualities of their Father (Nyame). The day of the week upon which a child is born indicates which divinity governs that day and therefore which spiritual qualities of Nyame (God) are transferred to and carried by the soul of the child.

The seven days of the week and divinities governing these days are:

Akwesida (Sunday) - Awusi or Asi

Dwoda (Monday) - Adwo

Benada (Tuesday) - Bena

Wukuda (Wednesday) - Aku or Wuku

Yawda (Thursday) - Yaw

Fida (Friday) Afi

Memenda (Saturday) - Amen


All females and males in Akan society thus receive their kra den (soul name) according to the day of the week they are born into the world.

Female kra den

Akosua or Esi (Akwesida)

Adwoa or Adjoa (Dwoda)

Abenaa (Benada)

Akua (m ) or Edua (Wukuda)

Yaa or Aba (Yawda)

Afua, Afia or Efua (Fida)

Amma or Ame (Memenda)


Male kra den

Kwesi or Kwasi (Akwesida)

Kwodwo or Kwadwo (Dwoda)

Kwabena or Kobena (Benada)

Kweku or Kwaku (Wukuda)

Yaw or Kwaw (Yawda)

Kofi or Kwafi (Fida)

Kwame or Kwamena (Memenda)


In the various names 'a' is pronounced like the 'a' in "father"; 'e' as in "bet"; 'i' like the 'ee' in "beet"; 'o' as in "no"; 'u' like the 'oo' in "boot".

The kra den greatly affects the spirit of the Akan female and male, for it carries the power which works to align the spirit of the individual with her/his divine qualities. This is one reason why the den to (naming rite) is performed on the eighth day. For example, if a child is born on Akwesida (Sunday) then the naming rite is performed eight days later on the following Akwesida. The divinity (God or Goddess) of that particular day lends its energy to the proceedings.

The child also receives its formal name, 'den pa', on the eighth day. The naming ceremony begins and ends before sunrise. It is the father that has the responsibility of naming the child, thus the family comes together in the early morning at the father's house. The Elders pour libation to Nyame (God), Asaase Afua (Earth Mother/Goddess, female counterpart to Nyame, also called Asaase Yaa) and the Nananom Nsamanfo (Honored Ancestral Spirits) to assist with the proper naming of the child.

After the name is acquired, the infant is given to an Elder from the father's side of the family who announces the formal name to the family for the first time. There are two cups, one which contains water and the other nsa (strong drink). The Elder dips his index finger into the water and places it on the mouth of the infant saying, "When you say it is water, it is water." He dips his index finger into the nsa and places it on the mouth of the infant saying, "When you say it is nsa, it is nsa." This is repeated three times. This is done to instill within the infant a consciousness of morality, the necessity of always living in harmony with the truth, for all of her/his life. Whether the consequences of truthfulness leaves a pleasant taste in your mouth (water) or a bad taste in your mouth (nsa), truthfulness nevertheless must be upheld. The remainder of the water and nsa in the two cups is then mixed together and given to the parents, that they may participate in the ritual in unity with their child. The parents are here confirming the importance of the moral lesson taught to the child and at the same time vowing to reinforce this lesson throughout the life of the child. The stability of the community, and the parents are making their vow before Nyame (God), Asaase Afua (Mother Earth/Goddess), Abosom (the Diviniteis/Goddesses and Gods), Nananom Nsamanfo (Honored Ancestral Spirits) and the family.

The time has come for gifts to be presented to the newborn, afterwhich the remainder of the nsa in the bottle is shared with members of the community. The name of the newborn is spoken to each member of the community, and each member sips some of the nsa as a show of respect for the child and as a toast to the newborn's health. A meal is then shared by all.

We recognize the name to be intimately tied to the purpose for which Nyame (God) has fashioned us and Asaase Afua (Earth Mother/Goddess) has borne us. This is precisely why during slavery and colonialization our African names were replaced with foreign names/labels - names that are totally devoid of power and directly antagonistic to our spiritual development and endeavor.

It is time, and of necessity, that we return to our true names.



"The only thing we wanted for our country was the right to a decent existence, to dignity without hypocrisy , to independence without restrictions... The day will come when history will have its say."-Lumumba

  

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yuckwheat
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Tue Feb-26-02 07:50 AM

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75. "mae jemison"
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chemical engineer, scientist, physician, teacher, astronaut, and woman of my dreams.

founder of the jemison group to research, develop and implement advanced technologies and the jemison institute for advanced technology in developing countries at dartmouth college.

a sista that if you read between the lines about her, is doing her very important work on the down low with a full understanding of who we are and where we need to be.

http://www.apple.com/applemasters/maejemison/

  

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ya Setshego
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Sun Mar-03-02 12:34 PM

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79. "Shouldn't"
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this post be archived now?


"Next to God we are indebted to Afrikan women, first for
giving us life and secondly for making that life worth
living." -Mary Mc Leod Bethune

"Don't Hate the PLAYA Boy...hate the GAME," Granddad Freeman of the Boondocks(7-11-99)

*Twenty-three percent of women are "autoerotic singles" — they prefer to achieve sexual satisfaction alone(source-bet.com)

*If U have won a Grammy, one of two things are at play: 1. Your shit is TIGHT
2. U are white
-(Me)

"We are not a problem people. We are merely people, who have problems."-Dorothy I. Height(from We Are Not Vanishing)


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Oooo baby I like it raw. Oooo baby I like it RAAAW!(c)ODB- Shimmy Shimmy Ya

  

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