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Subject: "Rams owner building stadium in Inglewood, CA (swipe)" Previous topic | Next topic
Warren Coolidge
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41991 posts
Mon Jan-05-15 04:47 AM

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"Rams owner building stadium in Inglewood, CA (swipe)"


  

          

per La Times

I'm pretty sure a current NFL owner wouldn't be working on a deal to build a stadium in another city without having the go ahead to do so from the league office, and enough of the right owners...

Stan Kroenke droppin bombs on em..

oh yeah...proposal is for NO TAX MONEY to be used on the project.


http://www.latimes.com/sports/nfl/la-sp-0105-nfl-la-stadium-20150105-story.html#page=1

Owner of St. Louis Rams plans to build NFL stadium in Inglewood

The owner of the St. Louis Rams plans to build an NFL stadium in Inglewood, which could pave the way for the league's return to Los Angeles..

Rams owner Stan Kroenke, who bought 60 acres adjacent to the Forum a year ago, has joined forces with the owners of the 238-acre Hollywood Park site, Stockbridge Capital Group. They plan to add an 80,000-seat NFL stadium and 6,000-seat performance venue to the already-massive development of retail, office, hotel and residential space, Stockbridge and the Kroenke Group told The Times.

The announcement is the latest in more than a dozen stadium proposals that have come and gone in the meandering, two-decade effort to bring an NFL franchise back to the nation's second-largest media market. But Kroenke's move marks the first time an existing team owner has controlled a local site large enough for a stadium and parking.

What's more, Kroenke, a billionaire who built his fortune in real estate, has the ability to move quickly. The Rams can choose later this month to convert their lease in St. Louis to year-to-year. The Rams declined comment on any plans to move, but it's no secret that the team is unhappy in the Edward Jones Dome, which is outdated by current NFL standards.

Kroenke's Inglewood plans ratchet up pressure on St. Louis to either strike a deal for a new stadium or watch the team return to Southern California, where it played from 1946 to 1994.

Under their current deal, the Rams can end their 30-year lease a decade early because they have not reached an agreement with St. Louis officials on improvements to the stadium. The sides remain about $575 million apart. St. Louis is expected to offer the team a new proposal by month's end.

The San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders are similarly unhappy in old stadiums that don't offer updated amenities. NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said the league would not be accepting relocation applications for the 2015 season. So the earliest any team could move would be 2016. Any team that moves could play in a temporary venue, such as the Coliseum or Rose Bowl, until a new stadium is constructed.

The Inglewood site Kroenke bought last year is too small for a stadium and parking, but the deal with Stockbridge, the neighboring developer, provides ample space.

"We are excited to unveil an expanded plan that will bring a world-class sports and entertainment district to Hollywood Park," Terry Fancher, founder of Stockbridge, said in a statement. "We are committed to working with to build a project that will put Inglewood back on the map as home of the truly great sports and entertainment venues."

The developers said no tax dollars would be used for the construction project, including the stadium. The group plans to begin gathering signatures soon for an initiative that would place the entire project on the Inglewood municipal ballot in 2015.

Inglewood Mayor James T. Butts Jr. said he was "extremely supportive" of the ballot initiative that would add the sports and entertainment complex to the already-approved Hollywood Park development and speed construction. The stadium could be completed by 2018, the developers said.

"This will hasten the time for the citizens of Inglewood to get the project they deserve," Butts said. "This is something they have waited for for a long time."

The owners are calling the combined Kroenke and Hollywood Park projects the City of Champions Revitalization Project. Wilson Meany, a San Francisco firm, is heading development of the site. Wilson Meany is also developing Bay Meadows, a former horse racing track in San Mateo.

The developers want to restore Inglewood to prominence as a sports and entertainment hub. Before Staples Center was built in 1999, Inglewood's Forum was home to the Los Angeles Lakers basketball team and Kings hockey team. The Forum was recently renovated to be a pure music venue.

Since the Raiders and Rams left after the 1994 season, the threat of moving to Los Angeles has been used as leverage by NFL teams looking to get stadium deals done in their current cities. In that sense, the region has been more valuable to the league without a team than with one.

Because stadiums are so expensive, now routinely topping $1 billion — and because there is no appetite in Los Angeles for public funding — the NFL has a great deal of influence on which team or teams ultimately move into the market. The league can issue loans to help pay for a stadium and award Super Bowls, which are used as a financing mechanism. Any relocation must be approved by a three-quarters majority of team owners.


As it stands, Los Angeles has two sites with the legal, political and environmental clearances for NFL venues: the Farmers Field plan downtown and Ed Roski's proposal in City of Industry. The stadium entitlement process, which invariably involves resolving lawsuits filed by people opposed to a given project, typically requires at least a year, thousands of pages of documents, and millions of dollars in legal and consulting fees.

The developers of the proposed downtown Los Angeles stadium, entertainment giant AEG, have a few more months to find a football team under an agreement with the city. AEG has vowed to build a stadium called Farmers Field along with a new wing for the city's convention center. The center's obsolete West Hall would be demolished to make way for Farmers Field.

AEG, an international sports and music entertainment firm founded by Denver billionaire Philip Anschutz, owns the Los Angeles Kings and the L.A. Galaxy soccer team.



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Hollywood Park, through its sheer size, offers a rare opportunity for large-scale development in an urban area, industry observers said. At neary 300 acres, it is about the size of Boston's financial district and twice as big as Vatican City.

The developers aim to create a new neighborhood in Inglewood, with curving streets and parks. The first phase of construction that began in June includes preparation of the site and demolition of the racetrack and grandstands.

Wal-Mart originally owned the 60 acres adjacent to the Forum but sold it to Kroenke after failing to get public approval for a superstore. Madison Square Garden Co., which owns the Forum, had planned to buy the lot in order to acquire more space for parking and possibly additional development, but Kroenke beat them to it.

Kroenke is a former Wal-Mart board member and husband of Ann Walton Kroenke, daughter of Wal-Mart co-founder Bud Walton. Forbes magazine estimates Kroenke's net worth at $5.8 billion — not counting his wife's $5.6 billion — making him the NFL's second-richest owner to Seattle's Paul Allen, the Microsoft co-founder who is worth an estimated $17.1 billion.



  

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Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
Looks like the rams will be back in LA
Jan 05th 2015
1
I live 2 miles from the Forum. I'm thinking selfishly now
Jan 05th 2015
2
      How is the new Forum venue?
Jan 05th 2015
6
           I saw the Foo Fighters there a couple of years ago and it was pretty goo...
Jan 05th 2015
11
           The sound there is REALLY good, I just saw Stevie
Jan 05th 2015
12
           The sound there was always good & there was never a bad seat before
Jan 05th 2015
18
                hahaha exactly what I was thinking
Jan 13th 2016
112
           It's fucking great
Jan 05th 2015
16
           I thought it was great.
Jan 05th 2015
22
           Yea I actually haven't been inside since Prince but I hear it's dope ins...
Jan 06th 2015
27
Yeah, now I think the Rams going to LA is really happening
Jan 05th 2015
3
im sorry but fuck that whole place
Jan 05th 2015
10
i don't know any fans in STL who're crying about the team leaving.
Jan 05th 2015
15
Inglewood always up to no good
Jan 05th 2015
4
I was convinced Mayor Jim Dear was gonna pull one of his dirty tricks
Jan 05th 2015
5
the Stub hub center and Dominguez hills facility is up for
Jan 05th 2015
8
St. Louis would be a fool and a half to bend over backwards for this dud...
Jan 05th 2015
7
http://www.fieldofschemes.com/2015/01/05/8310/rams-owner-gets-more-stadi...
Jan 05th 2015
9
Missouri officials will fight for the Rams — but not in a bidding war
Jan 05th 2015
17
Again - I'll believe it when I see it.
Jan 05th 2015
13
none of those projects involved a current nfl owner
Jan 05th 2015
20
      That's the key to me.
Jan 05th 2015
21
bye, Felicia! (c) St. Louis
Jan 05th 2015
14
that Inglewood area was always the most logical, best location for it
Jan 05th 2015
19
Bullet train broke ground today I thoght.
Jan 05th 2015
23
      Haha, did it? Even if so I expect more delays to push it past that date
Jan 05th 2015
24
Is there a precedent for what Kroenke is doing??
Jan 06th 2015
25
I tihnk Bud Adams did something kind of similar
Jan 06th 2015
28
      true...Bud Adams and the Oiler/Titan situation was similar...
Jan 06th 2015
29
           Yeah, he had already announced it
Jan 06th 2015
30
                I'm not sure it's too late for 2015....
Jan 06th 2015
31
                     The league already said no teams are moving for the 2015 season
Jan 06th 2015
32
                          the CVC is uner no obligation to sign a year long lease for
Jan 07th 2015
35
Rams worth 2.5 to 3.5 Billion with move (swipe)
Jan 06th 2015
26
this is really awesome for the small biz owners that stuck around
Jan 07th 2015
33
Yeh, def glad to see that
Jan 07th 2015
34
Bourbon Street Fish and Ms B's M&M's. And the whole Market St
Feb 10th 2015
49
Umm, about that "no public money" thing?
Jan 12th 2015
36
that's not a tax break....
Jan 12th 2015
37
      That's exactly what it is.
Jan 13th 2015
39
           Exactly.......tho Warren, unlike us, is a native Angeleno and a Ram Fan.
Jan 13th 2015
40
           Warren Coolidge is from a city and a state that is not going to be
Jan 13th 2015
42
           lol. come on man....
Jan 13th 2015
41
Jerry Jones- "Kroenke can move if he wants to"
Jan 12th 2015
38
man..Arthur Blank and them raising the bar on these stadiums
Jan 13th 2015
43
Big Rally today at the LA Coliseum...
Jan 18th 2015
44
per NFL.com- "Rams potential move to LA met with applause"
Jan 26th 2015
45
California State Senator Petition to bring NFL to CA
Feb 08th 2015
46
No.
Feb 08th 2015
47
OC Register: Kroenke believes he has votes to relocate (swipe)
Feb 10th 2015
48
Inglewood signatures verified (swipe)
Feb 11th 2015
50
NFL VP Eric Grubman: "I don't see owners saying no" (swipe)
Feb 12th 2015
51
Financial details of Inglewood stadium released(swipe)
Feb 24th 2015
52
Inglewood City Council approves re-zoning 5-0
Feb 25th 2015
53
Stan Kroenke's Inglewood Power Move (swipe)
Feb 25th 2015
54
Stadium developer has donated $100K to Inglewood officials' campaigns
Feb 26th 2015
55
watch how Mayor Butts answered that at the council meeting
Feb 26th 2015
56
      wow great job there
Mar 24th 2015
73
Good interview with Mayor Butts...
Mar 06th 2015
57
New Inglewood stadium pictures released (swipe)
Mar 21st 2015
58
A roof?
Mar 22nd 2015
59
it's a clear roof..... and it has field turf...
Mar 22nd 2015
60
looks good
Mar 22nd 2015
61
I think the material the roof is made out of doesn't
Mar 22nd 2015
62
the material is interesting
Mar 22nd 2015
63
yeah the vikes future stadium is what comes to mind
Mar 23rd 2015
65
      What's wrong with Levi's?
Mar 23rd 2015
66
           no discernable home-field advantage
Mar 23rd 2015
68
Sinking it as far in the ground as they are will help a lot
Mar 24th 2015
70
Am I missing a scoreboard?
Mar 23rd 2015
64
Look at that 8th picture...
Mar 24th 2015
69
See, that's what I was saying...
Mar 24th 2015
71
      Atlanta's main scoreboard is sort of like this
Mar 24th 2015
72
           there is a smaller version of that underneath the scoreboard at Staples
Mar 24th 2015
74
                I can imagine the neck cramps
Mar 24th 2015
76
one reason.....
Mar 24th 2015
75
in photo 9 of the slideshow...
Mar 27th 2015
79
Some architechtural pics of the stadium..
Mar 26th 2015
78
couple things
Apr 14th 2015
81
      also...
Apr 14th 2015
82
30 minute walk from a metro station... for LA i'll take it lol
Mar 23rd 2015
67
Stadium article (more details on the facility)
Mar 26th 2015
77
Teams presenting LA stadium proposal to committee next week
Apr 13th 2015
80
NFL Execs meet with Inglewood... (swipe)
Apr 17th 2015
83
Stan Kroenke presents Inglewood plan to committee
Apr 22nd 2015
84
Stan Kroenke spending big dough in Inglewood already
May 05th 2015
85
looks like st louis plans for new stadium coming to an end (swipe)
May 29th 2015
86
RE: looks like st louis plans for new stadium coming to an end (swipe)
May 29th 2015
87
      he's got the money...but the NFL is not going to
May 29th 2015
88
           Don't the other owners get to split that money? You think they're...
May 30th 2015
89
                he'll pay a fee..but it won't be a big as people are saying
May 30th 2015
90
Hollywood Park grandstands implode in Inglewood
Jun 01st 2015
91
Kroenke will help Chargers and Raiders in their home markets
Jun 10th 2015
92
St Louis NFL market study leaked...
Jul 07th 2015
93
but they suck...should the numbers be better?
Jul 07th 2015
94
      the market study gives some pretty detailed numbers
Jul 07th 2015
95
NFL apparently having trouble finding temporary venues in L.A.(link)
Aug 10th 2015
96
they only need 1 venue...and the Coliseum is open for it
Aug 10th 2015
97
They've already sold naming rights to the St Louis stadium?
Oct 07th 2015
98
San Diego Chargers will file for relocation to Los Angeles in January
Oct 24th 2015
99
not really the first to file...
Oct 25th 2015
100
Eric Grubmann:"St louis will come up short"
Dec 09th 2015
101
Disney CEO Bob Iger on board with Carson project
Dec 09th 2015
102
the NFL is working with Oakland on a stadium (swipe)
Dec 09th 2015
103
      i agree that Inglewood has the advantage right now
Dec 09th 2015
104
Rams, Chargers and RAiders all file to relocate
Jan 04th 2016
105
Rams official relocation application (link)
Jan 05th 2016
106
congrats fam
Jan 12th 2016
107
Yeah, congrats WC
Jan 12th 2016
109
I feel for fans in St Louis
Jan 12th 2016
108
thanks fellas....
Jan 13th 2016
111
Man.... i'm honestly just shocked right now...
Jan 13th 2016
110
Coolidge, u and TT are the first cats I thought of.
Jan 15th 2016
113
      it is messed up for St Louis fans....
Jan 15th 2016
114
New Inglewood stadium renderings
Jan 30th 2016
115
Chargers reach agreement to share stadium in 2017
Jan 30th 2016
116
Spanos and Fabiani are so full of it...
Jan 30th 2016
117
Los Angeles Rams going to the Super Bowl....
Jan 21st 2019
118
A nice update into how things are going (link, it's long AF):
Nov 21st 2019
119
damn lol
Nov 22nd 2019
120
lol
Nov 22nd 2019
121
LOL @ the NFL being morons and not moving the Raiders down to LA
Nov 22nd 2019
122

las raises
Member since Aug 31st 2002
14948 posts
Mon Jan-05-15 06:26 AM

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1. "Looks like the rams will be back in LA"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Inglewood is already back in business with the forum, this will be a huge rival to LA live.

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-DJ R-Tistic-
Member since Nov 06th 2008
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2. "I live 2 miles from the Forum. I'm thinking selfishly now"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

My real estate value in 15-20 years >>>>

------------------------------

50+ FREE Mixes on www.DJR-Tistic.com!

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MothershipConnection
Member since Nov 22nd 2003
7498 posts
Mon Jan-05-15 01:54 PM

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6. "How is the new Forum venue?"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

I've heard good things but there hasn't been a show there yet I've been able to go to... the last thing I saw there was Prince on his residency there with the old setup (and it was great).

  

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Wonderl33t
Member since Jul 11th 2002
21405 posts
Mon Jan-05-15 06:14 PM

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11. "I saw the Foo Fighters there a couple of years ago and it was pretty goo..."
In response to Reply # 6


  

          

It's certainly an aged venue, but it was fine for the show.


>I've heard good things but there hasn't been a show there yet
>I've been able to go to... the last thing I saw there was
>Prince on his residency there with the old setup (and it was
>great).


______________________________
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las raises
Member since Aug 31st 2002
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12. "The sound there is REALLY good, I just saw Stevie"
In response to Reply # 6


  

          

There a couple of weeks ago, the bathrooms are still the same aka terrible. But not a bad seat really

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Bombastic
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Mon Jan-05-15 08:51 PM

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18. "The sound there was always good & there was never a bad seat before"
In response to Reply # 12


  

          

>There a couple of weeks ago, the bathrooms are still the same
>aka terrible. But not a bad seat really

  

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RobOne4
Member since Jun 06th 2003
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Wed Jan-13-16 02:36 AM

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112. "hahaha exactly what I was thinking"
In response to Reply # 18


  

          

that venue was built for music. No luxury suites really helps with the sound. At Staples Center the 3 levels of suites really kills the sound in the place.

November 8th, 2005 The greatest night in the history of GD!

  

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Ryan M
Member since Oct 21st 2002
41741 posts
Mon Jan-05-15 08:06 PM

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16. "It's fucking great"
In response to Reply # 6


  

          

They gutted nearly everything. Felt like just the bones of the building were the same. I haven't seen it in action since Prince, but I did a walk through there for work and I was blown away how nice it is now.

Plus, I mean...sound at Staples is the worst.

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SoulHonky
Member since Jan 21st 2003
25919 posts
Mon Jan-05-15 09:06 PM

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22. "I thought it was great."
In response to Reply # 6


          

Not sure how different it was from the old set-up.

----
NBA MOCK DRAFT #1 - https://thecourierclass.com/whole-shebang/2017/5/18/2017-nba-mock-draft-1-just-lotto-and-lotta-trades

  

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-DJ R-Tistic-
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27. "Yea I actually haven't been inside since Prince but I hear it's dope ins..."
In response to Reply # 6


  

          

Pass by it every other day, and still gotta get used to it being red (again)

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Marauder21
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Mon Jan-05-15 01:32 PM

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3. "Yeah, now I think the Rams going to LA is really happening"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Because I can't imagine what St Louis is going to offer that's more attractive than what he's setting up here. There's nothing they can do to the Edward Jones Dome to make it as profitable as this.

I feel for St Louis, but it's in their best interest to not keep forking over tons of money to a guy who has had one eye on LA since he bought the team. Any deal that actually leads to them keeping the team would be such a shitty deal for the taxpayers.

------

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falafel stand pimpin
Member since Dec 26th 2006
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Mon Jan-05-15 06:07 PM

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10. "im sorry but fuck that whole place"
In response to Reply # 3


          

>I feel for St Louis, but

  

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SoWhat
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Mon Jan-05-15 08:04 PM

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15. "i don't know any fans in STL who're crying about the team leaving."
In response to Reply # 3
Mon Jan-05-15 08:09 PM by SoWhat

  

          

i'm sure the city would like to keep the team for the $...but not if it means building a stadium w/tax dollars. that dog won't hunt - not in Redbird Nation. the city would be a fool to spend that kind of money on that team in that market.

they can ask the Bidwill family and the Arizona Cardinals all about it.

fuck you.

  

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bshelly
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4. "Inglewood always up to no good"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

----
bshelly

"You (Fisher) could get fired, Les Snead could get fired, Kevin Demoff could get fired, but I will always be Eric Dickerson.” (c) The God

  

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Kungset
Member since Mar 29th 2004
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Mon Jan-05-15 01:43 PM

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5. "I was convinced Mayor Jim Dear was gonna pull one of his dirty tricks"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

and get this built in Carson somehow. that mfer.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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8. "the Stub hub center and Dominguez hills facility is up for"
In response to Reply # 5


  

          

a potential training camp location though...

it would be ready to roll with that asap...

  

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Dstl1
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7. "St. Louis would be a fool and a half to bend over backwards for this dud..."
In response to Reply # 0


          

He's had one foot out the door since he bought the damn team. That's why he blocked dat Kahn. Anyone with a brain knew this team was gone. Smh.

when I threw the rifle in the river,
it looked like Bol Bol was diving in the river - Action Bronson

  

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smutsboy
Member since Jun 29th 2002
33297 posts
Mon Jan-05-15 05:45 PM

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9. "http://www.fieldofschemes.com/2015/01/05/8310/rams-owner-gets-more-stadi..."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://www.fieldofschemes.com/2015/01/05/8310/rams-owner-gets-more-stadium-land-in-l-a-team-either-set-to-move-or-to-extract-more-cash-from-st-louis/

Rams owner gets more stadium land in L.A., team either set to move or to extract more cash from St. Louis

Posted on January 5, 2015 by Neil deMause

Hold onto your hats, because we have an actual Los Angeles NFL stadium plan, people! According to today’s Los Angeles Times:

Rams owner Stan Kroenke, who bought 60 acres adjacent to the Forum a year ago, has joined forces with the owners of the 238-acre Hollywood Park site, Stockbridge Capital Group. They plan to add an 80,000-seat NFL stadium and 6,000-seat performance venue to the already-massive development of retail, office, hotel and residential space, Stockbridge and the Kroenke Group told The Times.

This is indeed actual news, though if you’re hoping for specifics — how much it would cost, how it would be paid for — you’re going to be disappointed, because Kroenke isn’t telling you that. Stockbridge did say that “no tax dollars would be used for the construction project, including the stadium,” but we’ve heard that before for a lot of projects that end up involving tax dollars for things that aren’t strictly stadium construction; yes, this is California where that kind of thing is usually a non-starter (or at least much harder to get approved), but I’ll be withholding judgment on that until the financial story is actually released in full.

What we do have, then, is an announcement by Stockbridge that they’ll let Kroenke use part of their land, which is important because the land Kroenke owns in Inglewood isn’t enough for a stadium, parking, etc. So, does this actually mean that this stadium will actually be built?

That’s the big question, and right now I don’t think we can do better than “future cloudy, ask again later.” Kroenke, of course, is in the midst of negotiating a new Rams stadium in St. Louis, and Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has said he’s determined to get one built, with his two-man stadium task force set to deliver a plan by the end of the month. And significantly, Nixon hasn’t ruled out using taxpayer dollars — just “no new tax burden,” which could mean redirecting existing taxes. In fact, St. Louis magazine reports that in order to get around the city’s voter-approved law banning public spending on a new stadium without a referendum, the state would have the city take over debt payments on the old stadium, which would free up state money to be used for a new one.

That would still only amount to about $200 million in public money, which might not be enough to entice Kroenke to keep the Rams in St. Louis. Or it might just not be as much as Kroenke things he can get by leveraging his threat to leave. In which case, making a vague pronouncement about his L.A. site — we found some more land, we’re gonna pay for it all somehow! — makes total sense as a way to turn up the heat on Nixon to up his ante, because Los Angeles would take us back in a second, don’t you know it, so you better step up your game, mister!

Or maybe Kroenke really does know how to finance an L.A. stadium out of his own pocket, while also paying any territorial fees that the NFL requires for a team moving to L.A. (which ain’t gonna be no $2 billion, but could well be something), and turn a bigger profit than getting $200 million or more in subsidies for a new building in St. Louis. It’s all gamesmanship here, and the whole point of it is for no one to know whether he’s bluffing or not, so we shouldn’t feel bad having to say that we don’t know whether this is a serious threat. Not that I wouldn’t be thrilled for North Korea to hack into Kroenke’s emails so we can find out what he really thinks, but I’m not holding my breath. (And also that would be illegal, so if you’re a North Korean hacker reading this for some reason, I’m not actually asking you do this, okay? Sheesh, imaginary North Korean hackers have no sense of hyperbole.)

  

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SoWhat
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17. "Missouri officials will fight for the Rams — but not in a bidding war"
In response to Reply # 9


  

          

http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/mayor-francis-slay-s-office-no-bidding-war-for-the/article_fae60f8f-9dd0-5c19-9028-b8d556375454.html



Faced with the strongest sign yet that Rams owner Stan Kroenke is preparing to pack up his team for Los Angeles, officials in Missouri and St. Louis are vowing to fight to keep it here — to a point.

“The mayor thinks we should . . . not get into a bidding war with Los Angeles,” Jeff Rainford, spokesman for St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, said Monday, in response to reports that Kroenke has closed an L.A. land deal that could be the first step toward moving the Rams back to southern California.

“A National Football League franchise does have value, and we should want one, but let’s use some common sense,” said Rainford. “The parameters are not a blank check.”

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon, who has created a two-person committee to come up with recommendations on how to keep the Rams, took a similar position.

“St. Louis is an NFL city and I am committed to keeping it that way,” Nixon said in a written statement. He said he expects to receive a plan by week’s end “that’s consistent with our principles of protecting taxpayers, creating jobs, and making significant use of private investment to clean up and revitalize underutilized areas.”

The Los Angeles Times reported Monday that Kroenke has partnered with Stockbridge Capital Group, owners of the 300-acre Hollywood Park site in Inglewood, in a plan to build an 80,000-seat NFL stadium and 6,000-seat performance venue there.

L.A. has been without an NFL team for 20 years, and this marks the first time during that period that an existing team owner has controlled a local site large enough for a stadium and parking, according to the Times.

It comes on the heels of what was already widespread speculation that Kroenke wants to move the team back there.

In November, Nixon appointed David Peacock, former president of Anheuser-Busch, and Robert Blitz, attorney for the Edward Jones Dome’s public board, to evaluate options and report back by the end of January. They said in a statement Monday that the report will be ready Friday.

“The news today is another reminder of how much competition there can be for National Football League franchises and projects that include NFL stadiums, but it does not change our timeline or approach,” Peacock and Blitz said in the joint statement. They called it “a long-term process . . . that the State of Missouri and the St. Louis region are fully pledged to seeing through.”

“We are ready to demonstrate our commitment to keeping the NFL here, and to continue to illustrate why St. Louis has been and will always be a strong NFL market,” said the statement. “We will present a plan to Governor Nixon this Friday as scheduled, and we expect that it will meet his criteria, thereby allowing us to share our vision with the public shortly thereafter.”

The plan they will present the governor is expected to feature a site on the Mississippi River north of the Gateway Arch and would be pitched as part of a major redevelopment of the area.

When Nixon assigned Peacock and Blitz to the task in early November, he called it “a matter of civic and state pride, and one of international significance.”

“We are prepared to look at serious options to make sure we stay an NFL city,” he said then.

But he also has made it clear he doesn’t intend to give away the store. In an interview in December with the Post-Dispatch, Nixon articulated six “core principles” he wants included in any proposal:

• That the project is sited in a blighted area.

• That it’s environmentally responsible.

• That the construction phase pays “competitive wages.”

• That it includes a plan for use of the current dome.

• That it’s operated as a public asset.

• And that there are no new or increased taxes.

Slay’s office also stressed those principles Monday. “We’re committed to keeping an NFL franchise in St. Louis because they have value,” Slay said in a written statement. “I am confident that Dave Peacock and Bob Blitz, working within the parameters created by Governor Nixon, can come up with a viable plan to do that.”

Rainford said the mere threat of a California land deal shouldn’t change either the content or timetable of Missouri’s expected proposal.

“The parameters the governor laid out were spot-on,” said Rainford. “It doesn’t make sense to take money away from other important needs or to raise taxes or raise fees.”

The NFL has said the earliest any team can move is 2016.

“No team has applied for relocation and there will be no team relocations for the 2015 season,” NFL Vice President Brian McCarthy said in a statement Monday. “We are committed to working towards having franchises that are strong and successful in their existing markets.”

The statement goes on to note that any decision on relocation in 2016 or later is subject to approval by a three-fourths vote, or 24, of the 32 NFL clubs.

The Rams declined to comment.

Inglewood Mayor James Butts Jr. said in a news conference Monday that he backs Kroenke’s plan, which he said may involve a public vote, potentially as soon as June.

“No tax dollars have been requested or will they be used if the project is approved,” Butts said. “This proposal, if approved, is another step along the way to potentially moving Inglewood from a city on the rise to a top-tier metropolis.”

Asked why Kroenke would enter into such a plan if he didn’t intend to move the Rams from St. Louis to Inglewood, Butts responded: “That’s a really good question to ask him.”

Like the Rams, the Oakland Raiders and the San Diego Chargers have signaled they are unhappy in old stadiums that don’t offer updated amenities.

Los Angeles, the nation’s second-largest media market, has been a coveted potential goal for various NFL owners and would-be owners since 1994, when the city lost both the Rams and the Raiders.

The Rams’ lease at the Edward Jones Dome requires regular publicly financed improvements to keep it in the “first tier” among NFL stadiums. Two years ago, the Rams asked for $700 million in upgrades, including a retractable roof and a glass-walled eastern entrance.

Regional leaders declined — which means Rams can get out of their 30-year lease and start going year-to-year starting later this month.

fuck you.

  

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Ryan M
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13. "Again - I'll believe it when I see it."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

What is this, the 4th stadium that's set to build in LA?

Carson, City of Industry, downtown LA, and now Inglewood.

We'll see.

------------------------------

17x NBA Champions

  

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Warren Coolidge
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20. "none of those projects involved a current nfl owner"
In response to Reply # 13


  

          

actually owning land, and partnering for a project..

  

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SoulHonky
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21. "That's the key to me."
In response to Reply # 20


          

And, seriously, the value of that franchise would skyrocket if it moved to LA.

----
NBA MOCK DRAFT #1 - https://thecourierclass.com/whole-shebang/2017/5/18/2017-nba-mock-draft-1-just-lotto-and-lotta-trades

  

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SoWhat
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14. "bye, Felicia! (c) St. Louis"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

fuck you.

  

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Bombastic
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19. "that Inglewood area was always the most logical, best location for it "
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

The downtown AEG thing never made sense, the City of Industry plan even less so.

That being said, wake me up when the shit actually gets built and this move gets signed off upon.

Otherwise, I just figure that team will be here around the same time as the bullet train.

  

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Ryan M
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23. "Bullet train broke ground today I thoght. "
In response to Reply # 19


  

          

Not gonna finish until 2029 but still.

------------------------------

17x NBA Champions

  

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Bombastic
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24. "Haha, did it? Even if so I expect more delays to push it past that date"
In response to Reply # 23


  

          

My combined chances of being both alive plus around to reap the benefits from it are prolly a coin-flip at best.

But hey, in the post Black Messiah-era, never say never.

I just can't get too invested in the preliminary talk, that seems to be something LA natives traditionally like to do while I stare and/or shake my head most of the time, meanwhile ten years in nothing has really happened yet with any of it.

I wish we coulda kept Hollywood Park open in the meantime tho because that was actually a facility I frequented.

I'll wait til the new Forum has an act I wanna see for under $200 before I declare my feelings for the renovation project there but they say it's nice.

The old place was fine by me tho, great sound, good sight lines from anywhere, could move around easily, parking no issue, security was cool, tickets were cheap.

Not much else you need for that kinda show.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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25. "Is there a precedent for what Kroenke is doing??"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

regarding a current owner of a pro team.... going into a deal on a new stadium in another state...with a soon to be expired lease...

I'm trying to think of past situations with owners having stadium issues.....either owners who moved or owners who didn't..

have any of those guys ever gone into a deal regarding a stadium in another state, BEFORE their current situation has been resolved...

Has an owner ever did this and stayed?

has and owner ever did this..then did a lame duck season..then left?

has an owner ever did this period?

and if it has happened before, what was the response of the league and the owners at the time??

this seems like a fairly unique situation...

I see people saying that Kroenke may be doing this to have a team other than the Rams play in the stadium.

has an owner ever built a stadium with his own money for someone else's team to play in ??

has an owner of a team who is trying to get more money out of a city actually gone to the lengths of buying land and making a deal with people to build a stadium in another city/state...then turned around and took the money from the home city and stayed?

some historical context in all of this would be appreciated..

obviously I want the Rams to move back to Los Angeles..but I'm only wanting to deal in facts, since this has now seemingly gone into the category of a possibility....

I just can't see Kroenke or any other mufukka building a stadium for someone else's team to play in...lol...

  

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Marauder21
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28. "I tihnk Bud Adams did something kind of similar"
In response to Reply # 25


  

          

He wanted to keep playing in Houston until the stadium in Nashville was finished. But the crowds were so terrible that last season in Houston (obviously,) that Tags made them play in various Tennessee stadiums (Memphis, Vanderbilt) until they were ready. But they already had a stadium deal done in Nashville while planning on playing in Houston.

And the Nets stayed in NJ for like 9 years after announcing they were moving to Brooklyn, but that's still the same general metro area, so I don't really count that.

------

12 play and 12 planets are enlighten for all the Aliens to Party and free those on the Sex Planet-maxxx

XBL: trkc21
Twitter: @tyrcasey

  

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Warren Coolidge
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29. "true...Bud Adams and the Oiler/Titan situation was similar..."
In response to Reply # 28


  

          

but at the time though..it was a given he was leaving Houston right??

what seems to be different here is that Kroenke seems like it's a given he's bouncing....yet St. Louis seems to still be trying to keep him..

I don't see how a lame duck season would work like that....

  

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Marauder21
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30. "Yeah, he had already announced it"
In response to Reply # 29


  

          

I guess there was that last Sonics season in Seattle. It wasn't OFFICIAL, but their lease was up and everyone knew Bennett had no intention of keeping that team in Seattle.

OKC already had an arena, so it's not quite the same.

I agree with you, a 2015 season in St Louis would be weird as hell if they actually announce the move between now and then. But it's already too late to play 2015 in LA.

------

12 play and 12 planets are enlighten for all the Aliens to Party and free those on the Sex Planet-maxxx

XBL: trkc21
Twitter: @tyrcasey

  

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Warren Coolidge
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31. "I'm not sure it's too late for 2015...."
In response to Reply # 30


  

          

>I guess there was that last Sonics season in Seattle. It
>wasn't OFFICIAL, but their lease was up and everyone knew
>Bennett had no intention of keeping that team in Seattle.
>
>OKC already had an arena, so it's not quite the same.
>
>I agree with you, a 2015 season in St Louis would be weird as
>hell if they actually announce the move between now and then.
>But it's already too late to play 2015 in LA.

they have 2 different stadiums they could use...they have multiple potential training cam facilities to use..

I just know the league doesn't dig lame duck situations....

  

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ThaTruth
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32. "The league already said no teams are moving for the 2015 season"
In response to Reply # 31


          

________________________________________
"Stay out the dark, cause if I catch you when the sun is down..."
https://youtu.be/eaaTxVRG06c?t=89

  

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Warren Coolidge
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35. "the CVC is uner no obligation to sign a year long lease for"
In response to Reply # 32


  

          

the Rams to play in the dome next season.

Not sure what the upside would be in them doing it anyway for a lame duck season..

The league said no moves assuming that the Rams have somewhere to play in St. Louis next year..if they don't...that obviously changes things

  

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Warren Coolidge
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26. "Rams worth 2.5 to 3.5 Billion with move (swipe)"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://www.businessinsider.com/st-louis-rams-los-angeles-value-2015-1

The NFL is now closer to moving back to Los Angeles with news that St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke plans to build an 80,000-seat stadium in Inglewood, a move that would more than double the value of his franchise.

In the latest valuations released by Forbes.com, the Rams were dead-last, with a value of $930 million. Meanwhile, teams in the top-5 TV markets (L.A. is no. 2) all rank among the eight most valuable teams with an average value of $2.11 billion and those numbers are almost certainly on the conservative side as the Cowboys are probably worth closer to $5 billion.

The Buffalo Bills, valued just above the Rams at $940 million, recently sold for $1.4 billion. If teams in the top-5 TV markets are undervalued at the same rate, they would be worth $2.54-4.79 billion with an average of $3.16 billion and there is no reason to think an L.A. team wouldn't be at the upper-end of that range.

So, while a new stadium may cost Kroenke $1 billion to build, he will more than make up for it with the increase in the value of the Rams alone.


Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/st-louis-rams-los-angeles-value-2015-1#ixzz3O1ThO87t


  

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LAbeathustla
Member since Jan 24th 2004
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33. "this is really awesome for the small biz owners that stuck around"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

inglewood bout to pop again...

------------------------------------
2019 CABG Survivor

2016 OK Survivor Champion

be about it or be without it

RIP GOATs

  

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LA2Philly
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34. "Yeh, def glad to see that"
In response to Reply # 33


  

          

I do wonder if they are concerned about being priced out of their rents however w/ all the development that would come with the stadium...

---------------------------------
<--The drought is over

"have fun reveling in your pettiness tho" (C) Dula summing up 98% of OKS

"I didnt finish a damn thing...matter of fact I jerked off after she left."
-Kobe speaking to investigators

L D E A

  

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-DJ R-Tistic-
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49. "Bourbon Street Fish and Ms B's M&M's. And the whole Market St"
In response to Reply # 33


  

          

------------------------------

50+ FREE Mixes on www.DJR-Tistic.com!

Twitter and Instagram - @DJ_RTistic

  

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bignick
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36. "Umm, about that "no public money" thing? "
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

TL;DR
Greedy developers want $100 million in tax breaks.

http://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2015/01/12/ap-inglewood-stadium-developers-expect-100m-in-tax-reimbursements/

AP: Inglewood Stadium Developers Expect $100M In Tax Reimbursements
January 12, 2015 5:31 AM

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The developers behind a sprawling sports and housing complex in Inglewood — whose centerpiece stadium could become home for an NFL team — expect to recoup up to $100 million in local tax dollars in the first five years of operation, an Associated Press review has found.

When the proposal was unveiled last week, Christopher Meany, a senior executive with the joint venture designing and financing the project, emphasized “there will be no public dollars, no taxpayer dollars, used for this project.”

While the plan does not include any up-front tax money to build the 298-acre community of homes, offices and entertainment venues, a 187-page outline released by developers includes provisions for multimillion-dollar public paybacks to them over time from tax dollars generated by the project, which would cover costs ranging from installing street lights and fire hydrants to running shuttle buses and providing police security on game days.

The documents submitted to officials in Inglewood, where the stadium would be built, say that if annual tax revenue to the city from the completed project exceeds $25 million as expected, the developers, including a company controlled by the owner of the St. Louis Rams, would be entitled to reimbursements for funds they invested in streets, sewers, parks and other projects deemed dedicated to the public.

Chicago-based sports finance consultant Marc Ganis said claiming no tax money would be used in the project is “hyper-spin” and could damage the project’s credibility.

“It’s not an outright lie … but there will be people who think it is,” Ganis said. “They might be prospective tax dollars, and it might make sense for Inglewood to contribute them to the project, but they are tax dollars.”

Inglewood officials are reviewing the proposal but Mayor James Butts said the deal appears favorable because the city isn’t required to invest hundreds of millions of dollars into the development. The city about 10 miles from downtown Los Angeles could end up with a steady source of tax income and a vibrant entertainment mecca, he said.

“We get revenue that we didn’t have to make a financial investment for. That is unheard of in a project of this magnitude,” Butts said.

The proposal envisions a domed, 80,000-seat stadium rising on the site of a defunct horse track, and would also include a 6,000-seat performance venue and parking. It’s the latest in a string of stadium proposals in the Los Angeles area since the Rams and the Oakland Raiders abandoned Southern California after the 1994 season.

According to the plan, developers could be reimbursed an estimated $50 million to $60 million for building the structural backbone of the site: sidewalks and road work, landscaping, water mains and utility lines. Meany said in a statement those costs are expected to be paid back within the first few years from tax revenue generated by the project, and represent a fraction of the overall investment.

Additionally, the records say developers can be reimbursed by the city for costs on event days for police, emergency medical crews and shuttle bus services from off-site parking. They estimate that could tally $8 million annually, or $40 million for a five-year period.

The records were submitted to the city as part of developers’ plans to place a ballot question before Inglewood voters later this year, which must be approved before stadium construction could move forward. They first must gather thousands of petition signatures to qualify the question.

The alliance behind the plan, the Hollywood Park Land Co., includes The Kroenke Group, controlled by Rams owner Stan Kroenke, and Stockbridge Capital Group, which had been developing a 238-acre tract of homes, parks and office space at the former Hollywood Park track. Kroenke’s company owns an adjacent 60 acres, which would be merged into the overall development.

By the developers’ estimate, in its first 25 years the project will produce more than $1 billion in local taxes — on property, tickets, parking, utilities and other sources. The first $25 million each year would be guaranteed for Inglewood, and once developers are reimbursed for eligible costs, any surplus would stay with the city.

West Virginia University economist Brad Humphreys said that the cost of infrastructure in stadium deals is typically absorbed by government, even in developments described as privately financed, as with the Washington Redskins new stadium. He noted that research has found taxpayers often end up paying more than forecast in sports stadium and arena projects, once infrastructure and other costs are considered.

Victor Matheson, a specialist in sports economics who teaches at the College of the Holy Cross in Massachusetts, said the reimbursements for the Inglewood project amounted to “essentially giving tax breaks.”

“The project isn’t quite subsidy-free, but it is also a far cry from the direct building subsidies that averaged about two-thirds of total stadium costs in the building boom” of the 1990s and early 2000s, he said.

(© Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

  

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Warren Coolidge
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37. "that's not a tax break...."
In response to Reply # 36


  

          

and it's accurate to say this project and the stadium will be build with no public money...

the developers and Kroenke are paying for the entire project to get done up front...

the portions of the project that deal with public facilities like street lights, landscaping, water mains, street maintenance and the like....

the developers are paying for all of those things up front....

the developers will be reimbursed FOR THOSE THINGS.... for the tax revenue received from the project after the first 25 million annually....

So basically... the developers do it all..and pay for it all.... the city of Inglewood is guaranteed 25 million dollars annually at a minimum....everything beyond that goes to reimburse for those elements that the developers provided that are generally city/government related things.

Once those things are paid for...that's a done deal...

now... a lot of naysayers, and st. Louis people trying to hate are painting this as a "tax break" or tax money going to the developers...

it's not a tax break at all..and the revenue that will be going to the developers are tax based revenue that come from THE DEVELOPMENT ..not from general tax payers in the city or the state..

bottom line ...the city gets at a minimum 25 million per year just from the project (not counting all of the other revenue that will come from the project being in the city)..... The city, state and region get a development and stadium that they don't have to pay for .... and the parts of it that they would have to pay for..if it were any other large project...they will reimburse just for those parts..

a really brilliant plan

  

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bignick
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39. "That's exactly what it is. "
In response to Reply # 37


  

          

>and it's accurate to say this project and the stadium will be
>build with no public money...

No, it's not.

>the developers and Kroenke are paying for the entire project
>to get done up front...

Kudos to them since, you know, it's their building.

>the portions of the project that deal with public facilities
>like street lights, landscaping, water mains, street
>maintenance and the like....

>the developers are paying for all of those things up
>front....

Great. They should. Because they'll be creating the demand on public facilities by building a gigantic stadium.

>the developers will be reimbursed FOR THOSE THINGS.... for the
>tax revenue received from the project after the first 25
>million annually....

Which they shouldn't be because, again, they are creating the need for those things in the first place.

This is another example of developers using fancy language to obfuscsate the truth, and people falling for it. This is a tax break.

  

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Bombastic
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Tue Jan-13-15 09:39 AM

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40. "Exactly.......tho Warren, unlike us, is a native Angeleno and a Ram Fan."
In response to Reply # 39


  

          

So from his thirsty perspective......he's gonna tell himself whatever he needs to shine that off and I wouldn't ever judge him for doing so.

"I ain't saying it's right......I'm just sayin.....I understand".

Me?

From my own selfish interests I'd rather they had kept the Forum with cheap tickets, great sight-lines/acoustics with the old vet Inglewood security letting you walk all the way down to the floor as you behaved while Hollywood Park was still running live ponies on Triple Crown race days.

And of course if we could stop that "billionaire gets another buyout rather than pays off what they actually owe" angle from holding true I'd be down for that too.

But I've come to understand even while I can't ever accept or co-sign it, that tens of thousands of our opinions are no match for the billionaire that's winning.

Because the moment people might actually all wake up and band together to unite for what might be morally right, the rules of the game will be legally/financially/electorally changed.

Getting mad at the way our corporations, federal government and by extension cities are run is far more futile than being mad at the blackjack dealer in Vegas when u lose.

Maybe with both you and Warrwn being fathers, u might need to feel raising an endorsement or rejection will serve some long-term purpose because there's an inherent/paternal need to believe in such things for the sake of your progeny.

But as a single man trying hard to even convince myself of the existence of God?

Naw man, this rigged game has me resigned to apathy.

And I say that as a man who personally has come to know quite a bit about how the local Inglewood government operates dating back to the 70s, while also seeing the same frustrating bullshit on the news about how the rest of our nation/planet does as you two.

*deep sigh*

peace?

  

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Warren Coolidge
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42. "Warren Coolidge is from a city and a state that is not going to be"
In response to Reply # 40


  

          

>So from his thirsty perspective......he's gonna tell himself
>whatever he needs to shine that off and I wouldn't ever judge
>him for doing so.
>
>"I ain't saying it's right......I'm just sayin.....I
>understand".

pimped by millionaire sports owners. We don't have to beg..this is Southern California...the big leagues...we substantially support more professional sports and big time college sports programs than any city or area in the country and it's really not even close...


For obvious reasons...this is a situation that I have studied in depth...one that I've gotten inside information on....trust me...sure I want the Rams back in Los Angeles....sure I've been saying it was gong to happen probably for at least the last 3 years..... but Warren Coolidge deals in facts my man....

and the facts show that this is going to happen..and it's going to be huge...




>Me?
>
>From my own selfish interests I'd rather they had kept the
>Forum with cheap tickets, great sight-lines/acoustics with the
>old vet Inglewood security letting you walk all the way down
>to the floor as you behaved while Hollywood Park was still
>running live ponies on Triple Crown race days.
>
>And of course if we could stop that "billionaire gets another
>buyout rather than pays off what they actually owe" angle from
>holding true I'd be down for that too.
>
>But I've come to understand even while I can't ever accept or
>co-sign it, that tens of thousands of our opinions are no
>match for the billionaire that's winning.
>
>Because the moment people might actually all wake up and band
>together to unite for what might be morally right, the rules
>of the game will be legally/financially/electorally changed.
>
>Getting mad at the way our corporations, federal government
>and by extension cities are run is far more futile than being
>mad at the blackjack dealer in Vegas when u lose.
>
>Maybe with both you and Warrwn being fathers, u might need to
>feel raising an endorsement or rejection will serve some
>long-term purpose because there's an inherent/paternal need to
>believe in such things for the sake of your progeny.
>
>But as a single man trying hard to even convince myself of the
>existence of God?
>
>Naw man, this rigged game has me resigned to apathy.
>
>And I say that as a man who personally has come to know quite
>a bit about how the local Inglewood government operates dating
>back to the 70s, while also seeing the same frustrating
>bullshit on the news about how the rest of our nation/planet
>does as you two.
>
>*deep sigh*
>
>peace?
>


in 1990 when I started working at the La times...downtown la was fukked up...disgusting... terrible... for me it was a huge culture shock because I had never seen people living at that level...

today with LA live...staples center...remodled convention center....nokia.... ritz carlton hotel.... people actually living downtown in lofts.... It's actually beautiful in areas where it was horrible before.... skid row is still there...there is still homelessness, and drugs...but it's in a much better position today than it was 25 years ago....

Big money did that...and it didn't save er'body...it didn't fix everything...but it made it better for more than just the people who had the big money....

that's the American way player..

there is but 1 way for the Los Angeles to get a football team..

1...

uno...

and that is to build a stadium that ISN'T in the city of LA.... and for an existing owner to pay for it to be built....

I've been saying on this board that this was the direction it was heading in.... Stan Kroenke doesn't need to sneak or hide any scheme to get public money....the Rams will be worth 3.5 Billion dollars after a move.....

then let me tell you.... the next shoe to drop is going to blow this out of the water.... should be leaking soon ...

the naming rights deal that Kroenke has in his back pocket will mean honestly he's not going to trip off of shit...lol. In fact..he may ask the league to give the Stadium money they would have gave him to the Raiders and the Chargers because he's not going to need it...

the naming rights deal is going to be record breaking...

but don't worry bomb..you can switch over to the Rams....I'll get you a Vince Ferragmo jersey...

  

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Warren Coolidge
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41. "lol. come on man...."
In response to Reply # 39


  

          

>>and it's accurate to say this project and the stadium will
>be
>>build with no public money...
>
>No, it's not.


there is no tax...there are no bonds...there is no reappropriation of public funds to build this project...

the city of Inglewood, nor the state of California is pay any money to get this project built..

none...

zero...

The developers are building the project without public funds...

they are being reimbursed from revenue FROM THE PROJECT...for expendetures related to public services...





>>the developers and Kroenke are paying for the entire project
>>to get done up front...
>
>Kudos to them since, you know, it's their building.

but I thought it was being paid for by tax dollars or public funds...which is it?


>
>>the portions of the project that deal with public facilities
>>like street lights, landscaping, water mains, street
>>maintenance and the like....
>
>>the developers are paying for all of those things up
>>front....
>
>Great. They should. Because they'll be creating the demand on
>public facilities by building a gigantic stadium.

yep.... but usually those things..in large projects...the tax payers or government money has to be at least allocated through some sort of taxation or allocation of funds, before the project can be built..

this project on the other hand is going to be a huge revenue producer to the reimbursement to the developers can come from that....again...AFTER the guaranteed 25 million..



>
>>the developers will be reimbursed FOR THOSE THINGS.... for
>the
>>tax revenue received from the project after the first 25
>>million annually....
>
>Which they shouldn't be because, again, they are creating the
>need for those things in the first place.

and are creating huge revenue....


>This is another example of developers using fancy language to
>obfuscsate the truth, and people falling for it. This is a tax
>break.

not only have you not shown where the tax break is...but you seem to be just disagreeing with the fact as they have been presented, and assuming there is some sort of misleading by the developers that you aren't pointing out..

skepticism isn't a fact based argument.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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38. "Jerry Jones- "Kroenke can move if he wants to""
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2015/01/13/sports/football/buffalo-bills-make-it-official-rex-ryan-is-their-coach.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share&_r=1&referrer=

click show full article then scroll down

JONES SAYS RAMS CAN MOVE

JONES SAYS RAMS CAN MOVE When the St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke announced plans last week to build an 80,000-seat football stadium near downtown Los Angeles, it raised the specter that he might unilaterally move his team to Southern California.

After his announcement, the N.F.L. reiterated that any team relocation must be approved by at least 24 out of the league’s 32 owners. The N.F.L. controls the Los Angeles market, and Commissioner Roger Goodell has said that any move there must be done in an orderly way.

But in an interview last week, the Dallas Cowboys’ owner, Jerry Jones, said that while he prefers that the owners approve any team moving to Los Angeles, a team could possibly move there without league approval.

“As it would turn out now, apart from the league saying no, you can move there,” he said. “Keep in mind that teams have moved without the permission of the league. They just have.”

Asked if Kroenke could move on his own, Jones said: “He can if the league says he can’t.”

Asked if the N.F.L. preferred to coordinate any relocation, Jones said: “Again, there are just certain things that clubs can do.”

Jones’s comments are bound to stir interest in a murky and emotional process because he is one of the N.F.L.’s most powerful and unconventional owners.

The league said last month that the Rams, the San Diego Chargers and the Oakland Raiders would not move to Los Angeles in 2015. But Kroenke has the ability to shift to a year-to-year lease at the Edward Jones Dome, where the Rams play.

That would give him the flexibility to leave St. Louis in the coming years.

“The idea of Stan going ahead and making his announcement was driven by all of the right things,” said Jones, who cited Kroenke’s having a deal for a location and his owning a team with “a great legacy.”

Jones added, “All of that is to me a very positive thing for Los Angeles and for the N.F.L.”

Last week, civic leaders in Missouri unveiled plans to build a new 64,000-seat outdoor stadium in downtown St. Louis to persuade Kroenke to stay. KEN BELSON

  

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Warren Coolidge
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43. "man..Arthur Blank and them raising the bar on these stadiums"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SPKP7FaiqEE

Kroenke better go big....

  

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Warren Coolidge
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44. "Big Rally today at the LA Coliseum..."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://s9.postimg.org/4b1u87qan/Ramily.png

good turn out especially for it being Championship Sunday..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rza824DhJw0

they'll be more to come..

and a special message from Leah Steinberg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8tX9AaOtzhk&feature=youtu.be

  

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Warren Coolidge
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45. "per NFL.com- "Rams potential move to LA met with applause""
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

by the league..

this is a big sign of all of this coming together..

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000463601/article/rams-owners-stadium-plan-pushes-nfl-closer-to-la-return

Rams owner's stadium plan pushes NFL closer to L.A. return
By Albert Breer
Jan. 26, 2015 at 04:00 pm

After two decades away, the NFL is closer than it has ever been to returning to Los Angeles.

And after so many false starts since the Raiders and Rams bolted at the end of the 1994 season, one league source said, "we're beginning to see the goal line."

The early January announcement that Rams owner Stan Kroenke is planning an extravagant Inglewood stadium sent shockwaves through NFL circles, but -- according to those with direct knowledge of the proceedings -- was met with quiet applause at the league office, which has been waiting for a powerful plan like this one to get behind. And despite St. Louis and Missouri officials responding quickly with their own stadium vision, the momentum here has very clearly shifted west.

The bottom line is, this L.A. proposal is not like its predecessors. It's the first led by a team owner, blowing up the league's long-held belief that juggling the task of running a team with managing such a project in the nation's second biggest city would be too big a burden. It's on the largest plot of land of any of the proposed L.A. sites. It's in a more desirable end of the region. It's to be privately funded by a man who can afford it.

It's not done, of course. But the idea that the Rams could be playing at the Rose Bowl, L.A. Coliseum or Dodger Stadium in 2016 and 2017 and in Kroenke's new Southern California football palace in 2018 is not at all far-fetched. In fact, it's trending toward becoming a likelihood.

"It's a bold move by Stan," said one source who has worked with the league on Los Angeles. "Whether it results in a stadium at the site billed by the parties, whether it's the Rams going in, or a different team, or two teams, that much we don't know."

There is more certainty here than meets the eye, though.

According to two involved sources, the Rams presented the project to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell before the December owners meetings in Dallas. As it worked out, that was as Goodell and the league were getting the new personal conduct policy ready for voting. And the plan had always been for the commissioner to turn more attention to L.A. once the policy was done. Suffice it to say, Kroenke gave him plenty to chew on.

Two big steps are expected this week. The Rams will provide notice to St. Louis that they're going year-to-year on their lease before Wednesday's deadline to do so. And they'll likely turn in to the city of Inglewood the 8,500 signatures necessary to set up a public vote, which will most likely take place in the spring, to re-zone the land where the stadium will be built. According to a source, the team already has the signatures in hand.

The 60-acre plot Kroenke bought in January 2014 is approved for a stadium, but the adjacent 238-acre area owned by the Stockbridge Capital Group isn't. Once all 298 acres are zoned properly, shovels can go in the ground.


And therein lies the other difference in Inglewood: the size of the area where the stadium would go up. By comparison, the NFL's largest physical structure, Cowboys Stadium, sits on a plot of just 73 acres.

NFL officials deferred comment on the recent developments to the Rams, who declined to discuss their plans. But no matter how you chop all this up and put it together, St. Louis is on the clock. A St. Louis stadium task force presented its plan to Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon earlier this month. It included the dream of an open-air 64,000-seat stadium on the banks of the Mississippi River that could also potentially be home to a Major League Soccer franchise.

Two things need to happen for that stadium -- which, on paper, isn't as modern as projects in Minneapolis or Atlanta, though that could certainly change -- to go forward, and neither step will be simple. First, the land needs to be acquired. Second, financing needs to be secured, with the expectation being that it'll be a 40-60 public-private split. It's unclear at this point whether it'll take a vote to get there.

How that plays out will determine whether or not the club meets the league's relocation guidelines, which call for a team to demonstrate that the existing market has failed. If the financing includes an eventual public contribution, that will make it tougher for the Rams to qualify for relocation, but if the St. Louis plan does not end up including much public money, that could grease the skids for a move. In any case, the Rams have been less successful than the San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders when it comes to demonstrating that their market has failed.

But all of that might not matter. Remember, the league has a huge interest in making Los Angeles work, one way or another, and this project seems to meet the right-team, right-owner, right-stadium threshold.

The way it's been laid out to the clubs, the league wants the L.A. stadium to be an iconic venue that's a sports and entertainment destination. This vast property would satisfy that, with a number of projects expected to pop up on the periphery within the grounds around the team's home, creating a West Coast headquarters of sorts for the league.

Kroenke is also amenable to the idea of having a second team as part of the project, according to a source, which would help the NFL make the most of the effort.

At the very least, Kroenke's bombshell accelerated the L.A. timeline and put pressure on a number of entities with an interest in the market -- on the cities of Los Angeles (proper) and Carson to push their projects forward, on the cities of Oakland, San Diego and St. Louis to ramp up efforts to keep their own teams, and on the Raiders and Chargers to figure out their futures. The movement on the St. Louis stadium effort is proof positive of that.

The NFL does still have some control here. Three-quarters of the owners must vote to approve the move, as is required in the bylaws for relocation, and some league waivers and funding would likely be needed to make the project right. Also, Kroenke still hasn't satisfied the league's cross-ownership rules by divesting himself of the NBA's Denver Nuggets and NHL's Colorado Avalanche, something he has until the end of the calendar year to do.

But what's really important here is much simpler than that: The powers that be on Park Avenue have been waiting a long time for the right roadmap to get back to L.A.

It seems like Kroenke gave it to them.

And if they see it like that, it's unlikely anything will stand in the way.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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46. "California State Senator Petition to bring NFL to CA"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

namely the Rams...

sign it...

https://www.change.org/p/nfl-calling-on-nfl-owners-to-approve-bringing-a-team-to-inglewood

  

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bignick
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47. "No. "
In response to Reply # 46


  

          

  

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Warren Coolidge
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48. "OC Register: Kroenke believes he has votes to relocate (swipe)"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/stadium-650742-angeles-city.html

LOS ANGELES – As multiple NFL teams weigh relocating to Los Angeles, league commissioner Roger Goodell has formed a committee of owners to examine the league’s stadium options in Southern California and oversee relocation guidelines, league sources said Monday.

While a group of owners including New England’s Robert Kraft has served in an advisory capacity to Goodell on NFL activities in Los Angeles for the past year, the formation of the Committee on Los Angeles Opportunities is further indication that the league anticipates one or more franchises seeking to relocate to the nation’s second-largest market as early as the 2016 season.

The move comes in the wake of last month’s announcement that a development group that includes Rams owner Stan Kroenke plans to build a $2 billion, 80,000-seat stadium on the site of Hollywood Park.

The league has also sent a memo to its 32 franchises confirming previous discussions and memoranda that any decision to relocate in Los Angeles will require multiple approvals by three-quarters of the league’s owners. Selection of a stadium site, the stadium’s lease and financing arrangements, debt ceiling and sharing waivers, relocation consent and terms and the awarding of Super Bowls are all subject to approval of the league’s owners, NFL teams were told.

Preserving the voting rights of the league’s teams will be a key responsibility for the Los Angeles committee. In addition to Kraft, the committee will include Clark Hunt of Kansas City, Art Rooney of Pittsburgh, John Mara of the N.Y. Giants, Jerry Richardson of Carolina and Bob McNair of Houston.

In addition to evaluating stadium location options and overseeing the application of relocation guidelines, the Los Angeles committee also will coordinate with NFL broadcasting, finance, stadium and management council executive committees.

Although Goodell said in December no team or teams would relocate to Los Angeles before the 2015 season, the Los Angeles situation has received increased attention within the league in recent months. NFL senior vice president Eric Grubman, the league’s point man on Los Angeles, told the Register recently he hopes the Los Angeles situation will be resolved before next year’s Super Bowl in Santa Clara. Los Angeles is expected to be a primary topic of discussion at the NFL meetings next month.

Kroenke and Rams officials believe they have enough votes to move the team to Inglewood if they choose to relocate, said a person familiar with the situation. Officials for the Hollywood Park Land Company, the project’s development group, said they hope to begin construction on the stadium in December or January. HPLC officials said the stadium would be ready for the 2018 NFL season.

The Anschutz Entertainment Group’s plans for Farmers Field, a downtown stadium adjacent to Staples Center, is also still being considered by the NFL, Grubman said. AEG received a six-month extension from the Los Angeles City Council last year, giving the company until March to secure a team for the stadium.

Rams officials informed the St. Louis Convention and Visitors Commission in January that they will convert their lease for the Edward Jones Dome to a year-by-year agreement, enabling the team to relocate after the 2015 season if Kroenke is able to secure approval from the league’s owners.

Inglewood city officials have told the Register they expect an initiative asking voters to approve plans for the Hollywood Park stadium to be on the ballot in time for a June 16 election. The Inglewood city council could also bypass an election and simply vote to fold the 60-acre stadium project into previously approved plans for a 238-acre retail, office and residential development at Hollywood Park. Whether approved by Inglewood voters or the city council, the initiative allows the stadium project to bypass environmental reviews that cost millions and months, possibly years, in delays.

The city hired CAJA Environmental Services LLC for $88,000 last month to conduct a report on the initiative. CAJA also consulted with the city on an environmental review of plans for the initial 238-acre retail project that was approved by the city in 2009.

The city council will also pay Keyser Marston Associates $33,000 to review fiscal and economic reports prepared for the stadium initiative.

Keyser Marston previously has been a consultant on Staples Center, San Diego’s Ballpark District and Levi Stadium, the 49ers’ new venue in Santa Clara.

The firm was also a financial advisor to the City of Walnut Creek on a development project that also involved Wilson Meany, a firm that was hired by the HPLD for the City of Champions development. In the Walnut Creek development, Keyser Marston structured a business agreement between the city and the developer and advised the city on negotiations with the developer.

Inglewood Mayor James T. Butts Jr. said he expected the environmental and fiscal reports to be completed in March.

Los Angeles county officials expect to complete the verification process of the more than 22,000 petition signatures asking the stadium issue be placed on the ballot by the end of the month.

In an effort to keep the Rams in St. Louis, a task force appointed by Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon revealed plans for a nearly $1 billion, 64,000-seat downtown St. Louis stadium last month.

The St. Louis plan calls for between $460 million and $535 million of the new stadium’s cost to come from extending current bonds on the Edward Jones Dome and tax credits. Between $400 million and $450 million would be paid by the NFL and the Rams with the remaining $130 million coming from seat licenses.

The Raiders and Chargers, both with stadium issues in their current markets, are also weighing their options in terms of Los Angeles. Raiders owner Mark Davis joined forces with an investment firm and entertainment company last September in an attempt to raise $200 million to purchase the Hollywood Park site, according to documents circulated with Los Angeles financial and investment firms.

Contact the writer: sreid@ocregister.com

  

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Warren Coolidge
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50. "Inglewood signatures verified (swipe)"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

the signatures to re-zone the Inglewood City of Champions Project to include a stadium have been verified. Per Mayor Butts saying "the initiative did pass" ... I'm not certain yet if that means there will not be a vote on this, and the city council has approved the initiative ..... but if that is what he is saying.... there will be a groundbreaking for the new stadium within the next few days...

there are rumors that Stan Kroenke is going to apply for relocation within a week for NEXT SEASON...2015...

stay tuned

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/02/11/inglewood-secures-enough-signatures-for-stadium-initiative/

The NFL thinks it controls the L.A. stadium dance. (Even if it doesn’t.) The NFL knows it has no control over the efforts of Inglewood, or any other Southern California city, to lay the foundation for a football stadium.

On Wednesday, Inglewood Mayor James Butts said that enough signatures have been acquired to support the stadium initiative in the town that once housed both the Lakers and the Kings.

“We have the verified signatures in,” Butts told The Fred Roggin Show, “and the initiative did pass.”

The next step in the process will be a public hearing regarding the stadium project, which would be built at the site of the now-closed Hollywood Park horse racing facility. The public hearing is scheduled for February 24.

Rams owner Stan Kroenke has said he plans to build an NFL stadium on that site. Presumably, he also plans for the team that he owns to play there — with or without the blessing from at least 23 of this NFL business partners.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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51. "NFL VP Eric Grubman: "I don't see owners saying no" (swipe)"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          


things are beginning to move quickly.... the key part of this article is that Grubman is characterizing the "no move to la in 2015" as being predicated on the facts at the time.... I believe that the expediting of the process by the owners meeting next month may change those facts to a degree where if Kroenke makes the request to move for next season, it may go through


http://www.dailynews.com/sports/20150212/nfl-vp-on-la-i-would-say-theres-legitimate-hope-but-i-wouldnt-say-its-a-done-deal


NFL VP on L.A.: ‘I would say there’s legitimate hope. But I wouldn’t say it’s a done deal’



By Vincent Bonsignore, Los Angeles Daily News


Posted: 02/12/15, 5:58 PM PST |
0 Comments



NEW YORK — NFL vice president Eric Grubman, the man in charge of overseeing the league’s return to Los Angeles and franchise retention in current NFL cities, has been a busy man lately.

With the league intent on making things work again in Los Angeles, and St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke making the bold move to partner with a California development company to build an 80,000-seat stadium on the site of the old Hollywood Race track in Inglewood, momentum is building toward L.A. getting professional football back for the first time in 20 years.




And Grubman is front and center in that process while also trying to make sure things work out for existing teams in existing markets.

Fact is, with the NFL not yet ready to expand beyond the current 32-team format, satisfying the Los Angeles market likely means departing from a current one.

And that makes Grubman’s job quite the balancing act, one he took a break from to sit down with the Los Angeles News Group in his New York office to shed some light on what’s really going on with the NFL and Los Angeles.




LANG: Los Angeles has been down this road before and got its hopes up, only to have things fall apart. With everything that’s gone on over the past few months, is there legitimate reason for hope right now?

EG: The words I would use to categorize it, or grade the probability, would lead me to conclude that hope makes sense. Faith makes sense would be even better. But the words I would actually use would be, there is a serious opportunity that has been building for the last several years. It’s taken a lot of time and a lot of effort from a lot of people. I might be the face of it at the league, but there are a dozen people working on this project. And there are people (with clubs) who have invested an incredible amount of time. And the fact is, there are people in the Los Angeles community who have really been digging in. All of those oars, pulling, have been making consistent and tangible progress. So I think there is legitimate hope. But I wouldn’t say it’s a done deal.

LANG: It just seems like serious momentum is building this time. Why now? What has changed?

EG: My wife has observed for the last 25 years, one thing I’m really good at is the art of saying nothing. She says, ‘I listen to you describe the situation and then I realize you haven’t said which way it will come out.’ It will come out, and I think you can carve out for yourself the different angles. I think there are two things that are different. One is tangible, one is intangible. Referring back to my wife’s observation of my speech patterns, the intangible is that I have gone from making vague and bland statements to making vague and more excited statements. I haven’t changed the vague, but I’ve definitely changed the tone, the emphasis. That was deliberate, and I think that registers on people even if they don’t know the details because we have to do this kind of stuff in confidentiality.




The thing that’s tangible is that, both the league and the clubs have been willing to be on the record in a way that, while not making any definite statements, it’s been clear that we’re more willing to take a stand.

From the league’s viewpoint, we’ve been willing to put resources into leading the effort back, and going back a few years ago, even to the point of considering buying land as an option. And that was very noticeable to the people in the Los Angeles market. We didn’t put it on the front page of the newspaper, but people started hearing about it.




From a club perspective, a club goes from using mild reference and language to being possibly interested to (actually) buying land. And that’s a big step. You put all that together and I think it boils down to a brew that would suggest people think this is worth taking a look at.

LANG: Last December, the NFL alerted teams that there would be no move to Los Angeles in 2015 due to stadium and other uncertainties. Since then, Stan Kroenke partnered with a California land developer to build a stadium in Inglewood. To what extent has Kroenke settled any of those uncertainties?




EG: Let’s be clear why we said no relocation. This was not some unilateral, down-from-the-mountain decision on the part of the league office. This was after dozens of conversations with clubs that might be interested and with owners on committees, chairmen of committees. Now let’s take a step back and ask, what is wrong with this picture? It’s not just wanting to go to the Los Angeles market. You have to have a place to play permanently, your existing market has to have failed, and you have to have an approved plan between Point A and Point B. All of those things weren’t present in a way that could make the NFL proud. And, no one disagreed with that. So, while it could have been rushed and possibly done, we would not have been able to have the kind of pride and quality in execution that’s become a hallmark of the NFL. When that became apparent, there was no dissent. We talked to the clubs involved, as we said before, and while it may have been a surprise to the market, it wasn’t a surprise to those teams.




LANG: On the surface, it seems Stan Kroenke has settled two of the biggest issues facing Los Angeles over the years: Where a new stadium would be built and who would pay for it. He seems to be closing in on the third: Getting approved by city leaders. On the other hand, you have St. Louis also pushing the ball ahead on getting a new stadium built. Something might not add up in terms of a proving things couldn’t work in St. Louis. How does that get rectified?

EG: Our job up here is not to make things easy. It’s to do things in a way that reflects well on the NFL in its values and priorities and does right by its fans. Along the way, things can happen that you don’t expect. Our job is to do everything we can to make a club successful in its own market. Another part of our job is to develop new market opportunities. Until every one of the clubs is very successful with a road map moving forward of success, in their markets, it’s our job to do both of those things.




I don’t see that as being in conflict, I see that as hedges against one another. Not to get leverage, just because you have to multiple irons in the fire. So, I don’t know what will happen if a Los Angeles opportunity proves out, and a St. Louis opportunity proves out. But I’m confident we can navigate to a place which makes sense for us and our values and does right by our fans.

LANG: Assuming all the questions are answered with Hollywood Park — where the stadium gets built, who pays for it and entitlement — what could you see derailing this from an owners’ standpoint in terms of the Rams not getting approval?




EG: I don’t see owners saying no to any site that’s viable and attractive, whether it’s Hollywood Park or downtown. If it’s viable and attractive and a team wants to go there and the plan is good, I don’t see any problem.

LANG: But it still comes down to the Rams needing 24 “yes” votes. Do you see that as an issue assuming all the boxes get checked off?

EG: Well, we’re leaving aside the boxes of, whoever is departing a market has to satisfy the relocation guidelines. If we’re confining the question to what would prevent a “yes” based on the Los Angeles factors. I think if they’re all positive, nothing would prevent a “yes” vote. If you’re also asking in that same question, the non-Los Angeles variables, then my answer is, I don’t know. That scale has two parts to it. “Yes” to the new market and “no” to whatever the old market proposes. Although, you know it’s possible that an old market proposes nothing. And if it proposes nothing and it’s not viable ...




LANG: I’m going to resist asking whether (the NFL) actually hopes that occurs so that it takes you out of that pickle.

EG: You might resist asking it, but I’m going to answer that question. Because that’s a really important question. I place no higher priority in my mission statement, to creating a viable, approvable plan in Los Angeles and creating a viable plan in St. Louis. I’m going to share a secret with you, if you think an impossible scenario is created by creating a terrific plan in Market One and a terrific plan in Los Angeles — and that’s a really hard decision for owners — that’s exactly what I want. That is my job. And let’s make no mistake, that’s what the commissioner wants me to do, that’s what the owners want me to do. There might be an individual owner that has a different point of view, but I have a league hat on and it’s my obligation and the obligation of the rest of the staff to make it work. And that’s what I aim to do. To create viable projects. Not to create competition, because it’s our obligation to make a team successful in its market, but also our obligation to make it work in Los Angeles.




LANG: Has Stan Kroenke met all obligations relative to the relocation guidelines thus far?

EG: I don’t think it’s fair for me to grade Mr. Kroenke in the abstract or in isolation. I will simply leave it as, all the clubs involved have engaged consistently with the league. We have guidelines in general and guidelines that are specific to the Los Angeles process. And every club that I’m aware of that has been interested in the Los Angeles market has been in full compliance with the general set of guidelines and the specific L.A. guidelines. I don’t have any criticism to make of any kind.




LANG: What do you make of the Hollywood Park plan?

EG: I think it’s a very interesting site, I think it gets terrific and viable when it gets entitled and we see the plan. I think it’s clear it is making progress. I think it knocks off these progress points, then its grades go up. Whether or not it’s the best site, I don’t know.

LANG: The NFL recently formed a committee of owners overseeing the Los Angeles relocation process. What was the reason for forming it and what do you foresee its role being?




EG: That’s a very interesting question. The committee is not taking the place of an existing committee. So any committee that would lead to a judgment and a conclusion and a recommendation would go to membership. All voting rights are preserved, all committee rights are preserved. This committee is really in place so that between league meetings, which can be months apart, and between committee meetings, which can also be months apart, we have a sounding board and we have a representative group because they come from all of the committees and more that would be a part of this. We have a representative group that will act as a sounding board and can amplify once we’ve reached any short of judgment about how to navigate and can amplify that back to the clubs that might be interested. And it possibly could get involved, if we needed them to, if one of the site developers needed to have a conversation.




LANG: It’s been said and speculated that the NFL prefers a two-team model in Los Angeles. Is that accurate to say?

EG: No. It’s accurate to say what the NFL has said, and that is to the extent we are going to finance a stadium in the Los Angeles market, the Los Angeles guidelines say it has to be a two-team capable (plan). We have not taken any position publicly or privately that it needs to be one or it needs to be two teams. There is an open mind, but a stadium that is financed by us would be built as a two-team stadium.




LANG: How do you see the relocation fee getting hammered out, and the process in general playing out?

EG: To the first question, I don’t know how it gets hammered out. The answer to the second question is we have a lot of analysis to do, and there are factors in work that have not been in work in any recent situations. There is no formula to point to, no point on a board to point to. This is a process of a lot of owners getting up to speed on the issues. Thinking about it, talking about it amongst themselves, talking about it together. And I think that will play out over a period of time.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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52. "Financial details of Inglewood stadium released(swipe)"
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wow...

http://www.ocregister.com/articles/stadium-652111-city-million.html

Proposed Inglewood NFL stadium could cost record $1.86 billion

By SCOTT REID / STAFF WRITER

INGLEWOOD – A Hollywood Park stadium proposed by a group that includes Rams owner Stan Kroenke would cost $1.86 billion to build, making it the most expensive stadium ever constructed, according to a study commissioned by the Inglewood city council.

With design, engineering, financing and other indirect costs, the stadium’s final price tag likely will exceed $2 billion. The stadium is projected to generate $325 million in annual revenue, based on figures in a fiscal analysis of the project by Keyser Martson Associates, a real estate development advisory firm hired by the city council.

The Inglewood city council is scheduled to decide Tuesday night whether to approve the privately funded, 80,000-seat, covered-roof stadium project by the Hollywood Park Land Company as part of the company’s plans for a 298-acre redevelopment or hold a special election on the matter on June 2. Inglewood community activists expect the council to adopt the ordinance titled the “City of Champions Revitalization Initiative.”

Even with approval of the stadium by the council or voters, Kroenke would still need approval of three-quarters of the NFL’s 32 owners before relocating the Rams to Southern California. HPLC officials have projected the stadium to be open in time for the 2018 NFL season.

Documents filed by the city also show that the city would provide a tax break by capping an existing ticket tax at $15 million per year for venues with more than 22,000 seats. The threshold figure could rise annually based on the Consumer Price Index, according to the documents.

The stadium is projected at generating $205 million in annual ticket revenues, $141.1 million coming from tickets for 10 NFL games, according to the Keyser Martson report filed with Inglewood city manager Artie Fields on Feb. 20. The tax rate per ticket is 10 percent. Ticket revenues would account for 63 percent of the stadium’s annual revenues, according to the report.

Documents filed with the city council also acknowledge other “very substantial” revenue sources might be generated by firms or individuals outside of Inglewood and thus would not be subject to Inglewood taxes.

While Inglewood Mayor James T. Butts, Jr. said last month the stadium would cost $2 billion to build, the Keyser Martson analysis set the venue’s projected construction cost at $1.86 billion. The figure came from data provided to HPLC that was reached “by cost estimators with experience on other stadiums and reflects the cost of an enclosed stadium,” the analysis said.

New Jersey’s MetLife Stadium, home of the NFL’s Giants and Jets, opened in 2010 with a $1.6-billion price tag, making it the world’s most expensive stadium built to date. The Cowboy’s AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, the so-called “Jerry’s World,” and the 49ers new Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara each came with $1.3-billion tabs. The new Yankee Stadium came at a cost of $1.5-billion.

A proposed Carson stadium to be built and shared by the Chargers and Raiders has a projected $1.7-billion cost.

The Inglewood stadium would generate $55.6 million in taxes during its construction and create 23,522 construction jobs, according to city documents.

The project also calls for the HPLC to pay for “sufficient” infrastructure related to the stadium. The company can recoup those costs after reaching an annual $25-million tax threshold. That tax threshold will rise annually according to the CPI. The Year 10 threshold is projected at $30 million and $46.5 million for Year 25, according to documents filed by Fields and the city attorney with the council.

HPLC is projected at recouping all infrastructure costs by Year 17.

The initiative also calls for HPLC to pay the Inglewood Unified School District $4 million in future school fees and pay $1 million over five years for after school programs in the city.

Contact the writer: sreid@ocregister.com

  

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Warren Coolidge
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53. "Inglewood City Council approves re-zoning 5-0"
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no public vote...

Inglewood Stadium is shovel ready pending the obtaining of the appropriate permits...

it's going down...

  

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Warren Coolidge
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54. "Stan Kroenke's Inglewood Power Move (swipe)"
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http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-stadium-economics-20150226-story.html#page=1

It's not every day that a real estate developer considers walking away from $400 million in tax money.

But for St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke, it just might make sense.

Moving his team to his 80,000-seat stadium in Inglewood will boost the Rams' profits and greatly increase the value of the franchise, sports economists say. And there is even more money to be made in the massive real estate development around it.

All that helps explain how Kroenke might profit from building the most expensive stadium ever in the U.S. — with no public money.

Inglewood city officials unanimously approved zoning changes Tuesday night for a $1.86-billion stadium at the old Hollywood Park racetrack. That vote gave Kroenke a clear head start in the NFL-to-Los Angeles derby that intensified last week with the unveiling of a competing stadium in Carson that would be shared by the San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders. That plan could yet derail Kroenke's ambitions.

The real estate baron's partnership with the developers of Hollywood Park reflects how profits from modern-day stadiums come from more than just the stadium.

The Rams owner bought a stake in Hollywood Park Land Co., which is turning a nearly 300-acre racetrack site into homes, office buildings, a big shopping center and now potentially an NFL stadium. It's the kind of thing that Kroenke can't do in St. Louis, which is proposing a publicly owned riverfront stadium surrounded mainly by parking lots.

The Inglewood plan follows a model increasingly popular among stadium owners, said Rodney Fort, a sports economist at the University of Michigan.

"You've got to spend money to make money, and he can make a lot more off his own development in L.A.," Fort said. "It's more like a real estate development than a stadium."

The terms of Kroenke's arrangement with Stockbridge Capital — the Bay Area investment firm that's been financing the redevelopment of the Hollywood Park property for a decade — haven't been disclosed. But Chris Meany, a senior vice president for the project, confirmed that Kroenke has bought a stake in Hollywood Park Land Co. and that his involvement extends beyond the stadium.

That means the deal would not be "unwound," even if the Rams don't move to L.A., Meany said. The Inglewood stadium proposal still must navigate the Byzantine politics of winning NFL approval should Kroenke formally request to move the Rams.

Even without the development deal, some economists see a strong case for moving from a smaller market to Southern California.

Although NFL franchises split about two-thirds of the league's revenue — including television contracts worth $4.9 billion last year — local factors could give a big boost to Kroenke's profits, said John Vrooman, a Vanderbilt University economist who studies the NFL.

He estimates that the Rams could earn $100 million more each year on sponsorships, marketing and premium seating than the team could in a new stadium in St. Louis. Further, a move could increase the team's value about 40%, to an estimated $2.5 billion.

"The move to L.A. is an economic no-brainer," even if the Rams pay for their own stadium, Vrooman said.

Others disagree, including Neil DeMause, editor of Field of Schemes, a website that tracks stadium subsidies. Even for Kroenke — who Forbes estimates is worth $5.7 billion — and his deep-pocketed partners at Stockbridge, paying for a stadium is a big undertaking. The $1.86-billion construction estimate doesn't include a likely "relocation fee" paid to the NFL; those estimates run as high as $1 billion.

"That's an awful lot to spend out of your pocket," DeMause said. "It's a huge, huge risk."

One way to make that investment back is to use the stadium for more than just pro football.

The Dallas Cowboys' AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas, and the San Francisco 49ers' Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif., are helping to pay down their 10-figure price tags by hosting big-name concerts, international soccer matches, motocross and pro wrestling matches.

It's a way to make more money from $10 beers, $40 parking spaces and luxury suites, said Victor Matheson, a sports economist at Holy Cross College in Worcester, Mass.

"You want to use these things as much as you can," he said. "But there's just not that many 60,000-plus person events."

And the stadium would be entering a crowded market. The Rose Bowl and the Los Angeles Coliseum have long-term contracts with UCLA and USC football, respectively, and have been branching out to attract more concerts and soccer. Dodger Stadium, Stubhub Center in Carson and Staples Center also compete for some of the same events that might fill seats in Inglewood.

"There are events for stadiums, but it's not an infinite number," said Darryl Dunn, general manager of the Rose Bowl.

A state-of-the-art stadium could draw new events, said David Simon, president of the L.A. Sports Council. Today, the Southland can't host a Super Bowl because it doesn't have an NFL team. Nor can L.A. host an NCAA basketball Final Four, because it doesn't have a large enough indoor arena.

The Inglewood stadium is being designed with those sort of opportunities in mind, Meany of the Hollywood Park Land Co. said. It would be covered with a roof made of a clear plastic film — allowing it to host "indoor" basketball events — with open-air sides to let in the Southern California climate.

"This will accommodate basketball, soccer, concerts," he said.

Hollywood Park plans would make the football stadium the hub of a larger sports and entertainment district with a performing arts center and a broader development that would include six or seven office buildings, a shopping center 1 1/2 times the size of the Grove in West L.A., and about 2,500 new homes.

The Inglewood stadium would sit relatively low in the ground, and face the shopping center at its narrowest point, with an open plaza, instead of a broad expanse of concrete. It would include 12,000 on-site parking spaces for tailgaters on game days, plus more at the neighboring Forum.

That's a different approach than the one being pitched in St. Louis or the Carson project that involves the Chargers and Raiders, who last week released a video of a bowl ringed with vast tailgating lots on their 168-acre site.

The Inglewood development underscores why big-time sports aren't just about sports anymore, said Fort, the University of Michigan sports economist. The sports are often the anchor of a larger enterprise.

"It's getting tough to tell whether they're baseball teams or sports networks, basketball teams or part of a real estate development," he said. "That changes the perspective. The stakes have gone up."


_________________

  

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bignick
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55. "Stadium developer has donated $100K to Inglewood officials' campaigns"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Bought and paid for. Dummies falling for the okie doke. Again.

http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-me-0216-nfl-stadium-money-20150216-story.html

Stadium developer has donated $100,000 to Inglewood officials' campaigns

The development company that is on a fast track to building a professional football stadium in Inglewood has poured more than $100,000 in campaign contributions to elected city officials, according to campaign finance reports.

Hollywood Park Land Co., a San Francisco-based group that since last year has included St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke, donated $118,500 to the city's mayor and two Inglewood city councilmen since 2006, the finance reports show. The bulk of the contributions went to Inglewood Mayor James T. Butts Jr., a staunch supporter of the proposed 80,000-seat, NFL-quality stadium.

Plans for NFL-caliber stadium in Inglewood advance quickly
Plans for NFL-caliber stadium in Inglewood advance quickly
During four campaigns, Butts received $90,000 from Hollywood Park Land Co., according to campaign finance forms. A fifth of the $211,100 in donations Butts raised for a possible 2015 runoff race came from the development company.

Inglewood has no cap on the amount contributors can donate to political elections.

"They want to have their phone calls returned," Robert Stern, former president of the nonpartisan nonprofit Center for Governmental Studies, said of developers and lobbyists who donate to election campaigns. "They want to have contact with officials, and they believe that money gives them that access.

"It would stun me if campaign money was not being given by the people who want the stadium project."

lRelated Stadium committee to meet with Chargers representative for 'robust' talk
L.A. NOW
Stadium committee to meet with Chargers representative for 'robust' talk
SEE ALL RELATED
8

City officials and developers have moved at lightning speed since announcing in January that a professional football stadium would be added to the redevelopment plan for the former Hollywood Park racetrack site. Supporters see the plan as a first step to returning NFL football to Los Angeles. Developers have said they hope to break ground on a stadium by the end of the year.

The developers proposed zoning changes for the stadium through a ballot initiative, which would allow them to skip environmental reviews that some civic and environmental activists say protect surrounding neighborhoods. Under initiative law, the Inglewood City Council could bypass an election entirely and simply adopt the measure.

On Thursday, election officials confirmed that there were enough valid signatures to bring the initiative to a vote. The council could approve the development plan at its Feb. 24 meeting.

St. Louis starting preparation work on proposed NFL stadium for Rams
St. Louis starting preparation work on proposed NFL stadium for Rams
Inglewood's mayor said the developer's contributions have not influenced the speed at which the project is moving. He said he has complied with all campaign laws.

"Won't it be unusual if somebody who had so many projects in a community that they won't want to exercise their free speech to try and ensure that people are in government that have good governing sense and business skills?" Butts said. "I would find that unusual if they didn't."

Much of the money flowed to the elected officials in recent years, as the Hollywood Park redevelopment plans took shape.

cComments
@DougInTheCanyon Maybe you need to re-read Sam Farmer's articles. The guy has been far from a cheerleader unlike Bernie Miklasz. Not bothering to re-read yours and I see nobody did either (no ratings)
JOHN D.
AT 11:15 PM FEBRUARY 16, 2015
ADD A COMMENTSEE ALL COMMENTS
64

Campaign finance records show that in 2013, Hollywood Park Land Co. contributed $42,500 to Butts' 2015 campaign. Last year, the company contributed $15,000 to his 2014 campaign fund, according to campaign records. The mayor had raised money for a potential runoff in 2015, a campaign that become unnecessary when he was reelected in November with 83% of the vote.

Butts' campaign lent about $160,000 to other candidates, including Councilmen George Dotson and Alex Padilla, finance records show. The development company contributed $5,000 to Councilman Ralph Franklin in 2011 and again last year, campaign records show. Councilman Eloy Morales Jr. received five donations totaling $18,500 from the developers between 2006 and 2014.

Chris Meany, a partner at Wilson Meany, a San Francisco Bay Area-based development company that's part of the Hollywood Park partnership, said his company routinely donates to local elected officials in cities where it operates, particularly to incumbents, whether they support their projects or not.


"It's normal and customary for big property owners to be supportive of the city," he said. "It's in keeping with how we have operated over many years and frankly how many other large property owners operate."

Meany said his firm also made large donations to an Inglewood ballot measure to extend utility taxes in 2008 and has made about $250,000 in charitable donations to Inglewood-area nonprofits since buying the Hollywood Park site.

"We're not trying to get something approved," he said. "We're trying to be good corporate citizens."

Meany said his firm has spent a decade talking with Inglewood residents about the project, which began as a redevelopment of the 238-acre Hollywood Park site into housing and retail. (The football stadium has added 60 acres to the original plan.) The firm hired Gerard McCallum II, a former executive with the church group that owned the Forum for much of the 2000s, to handle community relations.

Since unveiling the addition of a stadium, the company has been back out in the community, collecting signatures and holding — by McCallum's count — 27 community meetings to discuss the plan since it was made public.

The development team has hired more consultants and community liaisons, employs two high-powered public relations firms and has launched a series of online videos with community members voicing their support.

"We have a deep, deep network of outreach set up," McCallum said.

angel.jennings@latimes.com

tim.logan@latimes.com

Twitter: @AngelJennings, @ByTimLogan

Copyright © 2015, Los Angeles Times

  

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Warren Coolidge
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56. "watch how Mayor Butts answered that at the council meeting"
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dFtJ6vtcyFQ

impressive...

  

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RobOne4
Member since Jun 06th 2003
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Tue Mar-24-15 01:00 PM

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73. "wow great job there"
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November 8th, 2005 The greatest night in the history of GD!

  

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Warren Coolidge
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57. "Good interview with Mayor Butts..."
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the man making it happen in Inglewood

http://kfwbam.com/2015/03/04/inglewood-mayor-james-t-butts-in-studio-with-fred-roggin/

  

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Warren Coolidge
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58. "New Inglewood stadium pictures released (swipe)"
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the night before the start of the NFL owners meetings in Arizona, the LA times releases new renderings and new information on the proposed Inglewood stadium...

Looks like Stan Kroenke is about to make his move....

stadium images: http://www.latimes.com/sports/nfl/la-sp-nfl-stadium-inglewood-20150322-column.html#lightbox=83109719&slide=1

article:

http://www.latimes.com/sports/nfl/la-sp-nfl-stadium-inglewood-20150322-column.html

tan Kroenke won't be empty handed this week when he arrives at the NFL owners meetings in Arizona..

The St. Louis Rams owner will be packing finished schematic plans for the world's most interactive and integrated football stadium, a futuristic, $1.86-billion, privately financed venue proposed for the Hollywood Park site in Inglewood.

Kroenke is not quite ready to put a shovel in the ground, but the major pieces of the project are now fully drawn, allowing the global sports and real estate billionaire to show the small army of architects and engineers at his disposal have made significant progress.

Representatives of Kroenke and HKS, the architecture firm he's employed, met with the Los Angeles Times recently in San Francisco to provide a first look at the detailed plans.

The timing of the meeting — days before the NFL convenes Monday at the Arizona Biltmore resort — wasn't coincidental. The league's owners will ultimately decide when and where the nation's No. 1 sport returns to its No. 2 market.

The San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders entered the running last month, announcing a joint proposal to build a stadium in Carson. Kroenke hasn't said he plans to move the Rams, but his intentions seem clear — analysts say it's highly doubtful he would invest in a stadium and not use it for his own team.

Any NFL franchise that wants to move would need the support of three-quarters of the league's 32 owners in a vote. It's unlikely any such vote will take place before the fall, as St. Louis, San Diego and Oakland continue trying to convince their teams to stay put. The league has already said no team would be allowed to move before next season.

The latest renderings show a light metallic, wave-shaped structure featuring a roof that encompasses the stadium and a surrounding plaza, providing weather protection but remaining open on the sides. The stadium could host big indoor events such as a college basketball Final Four.

The roof has metal borders, but the area over the playing field is made of a transparent material called ETFE, which is as clear as a car windshield and strong enough to support the weight of a vehicle. The design allows for breezes to flow through the building, enhancing the outdoor feel.

"This stadium grows out of the DNA of the region," said Mark Williams, director of sports and entertainment business development for HKS, which designed AT&T Stadium for the Dallas Cowboys and Lucas Oil Stadium for the Indianapolis Colts.

While the roof of the Inglewood stadium would be 275 feet above the playing field, the building would be set into the ground, giving it an above-ground profile of 175 feet, considerably lower than most enclosed stadiums. The proposed venue conforms to the height restrictions imposed on buildings within close proximity to Los Angeles International Airport, and the stadium designers say it also makes for a more attractive neighbor.

"So many stadiums are a big building that's out in a field somewhere," said Chris Meany, senior vice president of the Hollywood Park Land Co. "Very few have been integrated into the community."

Los Angeles has seen impressive renderings before, but hasn't had an NFL football team since 1994. Over the last two decades, several developers have unveiled all kinds of dazzling drawings and slick video presentations of venues that never came to pass.

What makes Kroenke different is that he is an NFL owner, and the league's second-richest owner at that. His team also has a deep and nostalgic connection to L.A., and he — along with development partner San Francisco-based Stockbridge Capital Group — has nearly 300 acres of prime stadium land the league itself tried to buy.

HKS estimates the Inglewood project would take less than three years to build, and the first round of construction permits could be obtained by December. Any team relocating here probably would play at the Coliseum or Rose Bowl during the building process.

HKS and its consultants are moving into the design development and construction documentation stages of the project. In essence, the group has basic designs in place, including the various building components such as plumbing and air conditioning, and is now onto developing the detailed building plans.

Why does a Southern California stadium need a roof? Aside from the fact an enclosed venue can play host to a wider range of events, a covering gives Kroenke the ability to create the world's biggest billboard, one visible to the more than 35 million travelers who fly into and out of L.A. each year. Images or animations could be projected onto the roof, instead of being permanent fixtures. Plans call for a sail-shaped roof structure that's twice as big as the stadium and shelters the football field, the adjacent 6,000-seat performing arts venue and the "Champions Plaza" in between. HKS is studying perforated metal panels and the mottled shadow patterns those cast on the ground like sunlight through a tree. The playing surface would be artificial turf.

Built to share



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Kroenke doesn't need to partner with another team to finance the stadium, but the NFL sees L.A. as a two-team market and wants venues to be capable of hosting both. The Inglewood plan is two-team compliant, which means it has two home locker rooms, identical sets of office space, and two owners' suites. Whereas the Carson proposal is based on the Chargers and Raiders simultaneously relocating, it is widely believed Kroenke does not want to share the market with another NFL team right away, and, because he would be assuming the risk of the stadium by himself, would want to reap the benefits of getting his team up and running as L.A.'s sole franchise.

All sides approach

HKS describes the stadium as "four-sided," which means the venue is accessible and approachable to the public from 360 degrees. There would be no fenced-off areas at ground level such as loading docks, mechanical yards, dumpsters and the like. That would all be below ground and accessible via tunnels located near the stadium. VIP, event-level parking could also be accessed through the tunnels. Counting the underground and surface parking, 9,000 spaces would be dedicated to the stadium alone, with others in the nearby office and retail buildings. Backers of the Inglewood stadium estimate they would need a total of about 21,000 spaces for an NFL game, and say there would be roughly 45,000 spaces within a mile of the stadium on game days.

  

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Marauder21
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59. "A roof?"
In response to Reply # 58


  

          

Interesting

------

12 play and 12 planets are enlighten for all the Aliens to Party and free those on the Sex Planet-maxxx

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Warren Coolidge
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60. "it's a clear roof..... and it has field turf..."
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for a multi-use stadium..... football....some soccer..... big boxing events.... final four....Olympics...wrestle-damn-mania.....er'thang..


  

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Flash80
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61. "looks good"
In response to Reply # 58


          

they gonna be blasting the a/c to keep that thing from greenhousing.

this is great for nfc west fans in general from a travel perspective. hell, going to the old halo in the early 90's used to feel like a 49er home game.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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62. "I think the material the roof is made out of doesn't"
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magnify the sun...

I need to do some research on the stuff..but it's pretty widely used right now..... the new Vikings stadium has it also....

  

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HecticHavoc
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63. "the material is interesting"
In response to Reply # 62


  

          

im a complete novice on it but its really strong.

stadium pics look beautiful tho. NFC West owns the standard.

i was reading that they were going to be able to display advertisements on the roof at night (for LAX flights). i cant even imagine the revenue that would bring in.

-----------------------------------------

  

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Flash80
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65. "yeah the vikes future stadium is what comes to mind"
In response to Reply # 62
Mon Mar-23-15 12:43 PM by Flash80

          

looks like a good portion of it is shaded too. and it's minneapolis.

at the end of the day, i'm pretty sure no architect is gonna be following the levi's stadium blueprint, which has been largely regarded as a bust so far.

  

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Marauder21
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66. "What's wrong with Levi's?"
In response to Reply # 65


  

          

Not too familiar with it. I've seen it on TV, and while it looks a little weird for an NFL stadium, it doesn't look BAD per se. I know people don't like the location of it, but what's wrong with the blueprint?

------

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Flash80
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68. "no discernable home-field advantage"
In response to Reply # 66
Mon Mar-23-15 05:35 PM by Flash80

          

a couple things..

sound escapes due to the open-airness and no overhangs, lending to zero home-crowd advantage at times, assuming the "fans" are making noise at all.

there's essentially no seats in the shade except for luxury boxes. the entire east side is the stadium cooks in the second half. like, an old man died in the preseason. august/september and into october in the south bay is pretty fucking hot for bay area standards.

so people flee their seats for the shaded concessions. no one in their seats = again no crowd noise.

glad they finally figured out the turf issue after replacing the field three times, though.

i know it's year one in the new digs, of which jim harbaugh's name and face were marketed to hook-link-and-sinker the PSL holders for the big $50-80K buy-in, but so far jed's $1.3B "sustainable" toy ain't made a lick of a difference.

we'll see what happens this year.

  

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B9
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70. "Sinking it as far in the ground as they are will help a lot"
In response to Reply # 61


          

it looks like a good 6 stories below ground at field level, and all the vegetation inside the stadium serves a duel purpose of cleaning the air and keeping the soil moist, which will keep the lower levels cool.
It's actually a pretty smart design if it happens as planned.

  

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Sleepy
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64. "Am I missing a scoreboard?"
In response to Reply # 58


  

          

Maybe it's intentional being that the Rams will be playing there.

j/k

But seriously, I don't see any place for a stadium sized scoreboard. I see the ribbon boards but that's not going to cut it for a stadium of this size. More importantly, I don't even see a place for it.

You're such pests...now, what is it you want? In your depths of your ignorance, what is it you want? Well, whatever it is you want, I can't deliver because I just don't see it. - Orson Welles


Never Tired, Always Sleepy

  

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B9
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69. "Look at that 8th picture..."
In response to Reply # 64


          

Everything that is blue represents LCD screens, so the entire stadium is going to be wrapped in scoreboards and advertising. Portions above the endzones are likely to be big enough to serve as main displays. Won't be as big as Cowboy's bullshit, but who really needs that if the sight lines are as good as these drawings portend?

  

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Sleepy
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71. "See, that's what I was saying..."
In response to Reply # 69


  

          

>Everything that is blue represents LCD screens, so the entire
>stadium is going to be wrapped in scoreboards and advertising.
>Portions above the endzones are likely to be big enough to
>serve as main displays. Won't be as big as Cowboy's bullshit,
>but who really needs that if the sight lines are as good as
>these drawings portend?


These ribbon boards along the sides are fine for ads and simple scores, but for large replays and whatnot, I don't know if they are large enough. I'm not expecting what they have in Dallas, or Jacksonville for that matter, but what is displayed here looks too small to be effective.

I'm hoping that you're right, and that the end zone displays are large enough for that purpose. Hopefully they will scale better on the real thing.


You're such pests...now, what is it you want? In your depths of your ignorance, what is it you want? Well, whatever it is you want, I can't deliver because I just don't see it. - Orson Welles


Never Tired, Always Sleepy

  

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B9
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72. "Atlanta's main scoreboard is sort of like this"
In response to Reply # 71


          

And it makes little sense to me in drawings, but it's the inside of a circular drum:
https://wdanielanderson.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/design-concepts-102513-03.jpg

  

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RobOne4
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74. "there is a smaller version of that underneath the scoreboard at Staples"
In response to Reply # 72


  

          

never noticed it until I sat on the glass at a Kings game. It was perfect for us since we were under the scoreboard. So it worked when we wanted to watch replays or if the play moved to a corner of the ice we couldn't see. But as a replacement to a regular scoreboard no thanks.

November 8th, 2005 The greatest night in the history of GD!

  

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Sleepy
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76. "I can imagine the neck cramps"
In response to Reply # 74


  

          

This is just a stupid decision. It's trying to have the cake and eating it too. Owners want maximum seats, because seats = $$$. But a big scoreboard will negate seating. The only way around that is a centrally placed scoreboard like Jerry's place. Everyone will have to looking up all the time for every replay.

This is why I hate IMAX theaters. It can be too uncomfortable after a while. Especially if the seats don't recline a little, and I doubt they will at a stadium.

You're such pests...now, what is it you want? In your depths of your ignorance, what is it you want? Well, whatever it is you want, I can't deliver because I just don't see it. - Orson Welles


Never Tired, Always Sleepy

  

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Warren Coolidge
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75. "one reason....."
In response to Reply # 64


  

          

one of the parts that Kroenke is holding in his hand until he has to use it is that naming rights deal he has lined up for this...it's supposed to be the biggest naming rights deal ever...by far.... and I'm assuming the scoreboard might be a part of that..so they are keeping that under wraps for now...

  

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obsidianchrysalis
Member since Jan 29th 2003
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79. "in photo 9 of the slideshow..."
In response to Reply # 64


  

          

The ribbon display the top of the stadium along with the ribbon at the end of the middle tier will serve as the 'scoreboard' or multiple scoreboards.

Guessing at the scale of those photos, those ribbons would be the height of a 'deck' of the stadium or several stories in height.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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78. "Some architechtural pics of the stadium.."
In response to Reply # 58
Thu Mar-26-15 11:58 PM by Warren Coolidge

  

          


http://s9.postimg.org/71lvhv2ov/10981700_10152657988340981_5773625093735936513_n.jpg

http://s3.postimg.org/mwuadc6c3/11080993_10152657988730981_9134352096134004937_n.jpg

http://s12.postimg.org/4o2ih9259/11096531_10152657988440981_7706174849188052877_n.jpg

http://s1.postimg.org/48t20p8fj/11081106_10152657988445981_4066879872991836867_n.jpg

found a couple of these....

this is some high tech stuff here...

  

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Selah
Member since Jun 05th 2002
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81. "couple things"
In response to Reply # 58


          

this picture right here is hilarious if you know what the area currently looks like

http://www.trbimg.com/img-550c7340/turbine/la-sp-sn-new-stadium-20150320-007/1200/1200x675

which side is Prairie? I see the forum, but there's no Manchester

also, the number of non-Black and Latino faces just casually walking around in those other shots is kinda telling in terms of what they think will make this thing sell

  

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Selah
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82. "also..."
In response to Reply # 81


          

all those fountains and whatnot aren't gonna fly in this drought

and where is the parking?

  

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Kungset
Member since Mar 29th 2004
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67. "30 minute walk from a metro station... for LA i'll take it lol"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

  

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Warren Coolidge
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77. "Stadium article (more details on the facility)"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://www.inglewoodtodaynews.com/index.php/component/k2/item/359-new-stadium-designs-brings-inglewood-stadium-to-life



Inglewood’s stadium dreams became more real on Tuesday when HKS, an architecture firm hired by St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke, presented stunning new renderings of the project. The inspiring presentation vividly captured the look and field of the future sports venue.



Since Kroenke purchased 60 acres in Inglewood last year, rumors surfaced that it was a ploy to make St. Louis meet his demands for a new Rams stadium. But now, with just one season under contract at Edward Jones Dome, and armed with finished plans to NFL owners meeting in Arizona this week, it doesn’t appear that Kroenke is playing games—at least not in St. Louis. Analysts say the billionaire sports and real estate tycoon would never invest money in Inglewood if he did not intend to relocate his team.



Fortunately, Kroenke has lots of ammunition. The proposed 80,000-seat stadium is packed with amenities that provide football fans with fresh new experiences. It is described as “the world's most interactive and integrated football stadium, a futuristic, $1.86-billion, privately financed venue proposed for the Hollywood Park site in Inglewood.”



The NFL has the final say on whether the Rams will move to Inglewood or remain in St. Louis after the 2015-16 season. Such a move requires at least a three quarters vote by the 32 league owners. None of that has deterred HKS or Hollywood Park Land Company—developers of the new 238-acre site which will integrate the stadium into its design—from moving forward.



The new renderings reveal several attractive design features:

· A huge, snail-shaped clear roof that can be used "to create the world's biggest billboard,” visible to 35 million travelers flying in and out of L.A. each year. Retractable roof design that allows the venue to adjust to accommodate events of all sizes when there is no sporting event going on.



· Built to accommodate two teams, the stadium will have two home locker rooms, identical sets of office space, and two owners' suites.



· Four-sided design allows the venue to be approached by the public from 360 degrees. There would be no fenced-off areas at ground level such as loading docks, mechanical yards, or dumpsters. These functions will be performed in underground areas.



· Built below ground level to comply with height restrictions imposed on buildings within the LAX flight path.



Noting the firm’s commitment to building the world’s most unique sports venue, Mark Williams, HKS sports and entertainment business director, said, “We are studying the (Southern California) region from the climate to the way people experience sports and entertainment and letting that drive the design.” Concepts guiding the design will include embedded objects, regional character, layering, and sustainability. “We don’t need to do a building that looks like every other stadium when we can take advantage of the best climate in the country.”



Designed for multiple purposes, not just for football games, the stadium can be used for a number of other events as well. “This will be the most successful stadium in the world,” Williams said. “Whether it’s a 12-year-old’s birthday party or the Super Bowl, this is something they will remember the rest of their lives.”



"So many stadiums are a big building that's out in a field somewhere," Hollywood Park Land Co. senior vice president Chris Meany said. "Very few have been integrated into the community."





The stadium is expected to be finished in 2018. Teams moving to L.A. before then will most likely play at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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80. "Teams presenting LA stadium proposal to committee next week"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

also to add to this story.... Fred Roggin, who is Inglewood's Mayor Butts main go to guy in the media reported that today, the NFL was in Inglewood getting a report on the progress they are making with the city of champions project....

this while it's announced today that the Rams and Stan Kroenke will present their stadium plans to the NFL's LA committee.... along with the chargers/raiders presenting their carson proposal..

Stan Kroenke and Inglewood are way ahead of the curve, and the NFL is looking like they are about to make this happen.

http://www.bizjournals.com/stlouis/news/2015/04/13/nfl-teams-to-present-plans-for-l-a-stadiums-next.html

NFL teams to present plans for L.A. stadiums next week

Apr 13, 2015, 1:36pm CDT

By Daniel Kaplan, staff writer for SportsBusiness Journal
The three NFL teams proposing stadiums in Los Angeles are scheduled to present their plans next week to the six NFL owners in charge of the process, the latest and most significant step yet if the sport is to return to the California city after a more than two-decade absence.

Owners of the Oakland Raiders, St. Louis Rams and San Diego Chargers will offer their most detailed stadium plans to date at the meeting April 22 in New York, numerous sources said last week. Those presentations will include details on architecture, financing and the political process in their efforts.

In addition, NFL Executive Vice President Eric Grubman will update the league’s six-owner Los Angeles committee on the efforts in the teams’ current home markets to keep the franchises in those cities. Grubman is the league executive charged with overseeing the NFL’s Los Angeles process.

“The committee expects details, progress reports, design plans, financing, risk factors, what to expect and when,” said one source close to the committee. That would constitute by far the most thorough update the six owners have received since NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell appointed them to the committee in February.

The Rams, Raiders and Chargers each declined to comment.

The six owners on the committee are John Mara (New York Giants), Robert Kraft (New England), Jerry Richardson (Carolina), Clark Hunt (Kansas City), Art Rooney II (Pittsburgh) and Bob McNair (Houston). They will report to the league’s full ownership at the scheduled May 19 league meeting in San Francisco.

Rams owner Stan Kroenke in early January unveiled a nearly $2 billion stadium proposal for Inglewood, Calif. Soon after, the Raiders and Chargers jointly proposed a stadium in Carson, Calif. In each case, the team’s current home market is striving to keep the franchise where it now plays.

The NFL’s relocation bylaws grant significant deference to home markets, creating parallel processes in Los Angeles and in St. Louis, Oakland and San Diego.

Several of the committee owners, including Kraft and Mara, have publicly stated their belief that the NFL will be back in Los Angeles next year. Goodell tempered that sentiment in public comments to reporters after the league’s annual meeting last month.

The Rams have already won political support for their Inglewood stadium; the Chargers and Raiders are expected to get similar such approval this summer. The Chargers and Raiders, meanwhile, are both giving some credence to the local efforts to keep them, while Kroenke has largely disengaged from the effort in St. Louis to keep the Rams.

The NFL’s Los Angeles committee is not the only league group that’s meeting in New York next week. Several committees are meeting, as is common in the weeks leading up to a full league gathering.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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83. "NFL Execs meet with Inglewood... (swipe)"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://www.latimes.com/sports/sportsnow/la-sp-nfl-meet-chargers-raiders-carson-stadium-20150416-story.html


NFL execs meet with advocates for Carson, Inglewood stadium projects

By Sam Farmer, Nathan Fenno and Tim Logan contact the reporters


Representatives of proposed stadium projects in Carson and Inglewood met with NFL executives Thursday as the competition to return the league to the Los Angeles area continued..

Eric Grubman, an NFL senior vice president who is the league's point man on the L.A. market, attended both meetings.

Those included a session with officials from the San Diego Chargers, Oakland Raiders and the city of Carson that lasted about 40 minutes in downtown L.A.

Carson City Councilman Albert Robles, who will be sworn in as the city's mayor Tuesday, said Grubman explained the league's process regarding the rival proposals. The tone of the discussion was positive, he added.

"I enjoyed talking to him," he said.

Raiders President Marc Badain, who also attended the meeting, gave Robles a silver lapel pin with the team's logo. The mayor-to-be, who also owns a half-Chargers, half-Raiders jersey, wore the pin on his suit after the meeting.

On Tuesday, Carson's City Council will take up a ballot initiative to authorize the privately financed, $1.7-billion project. The three-member council could either adopt the initiative, as Inglewood's City Council did in February for the proposal there, or schedule a public vote. Robles said he wants to see the city's economic and environmental reports on the project, due Monday, before deciding. But he is open to approving the initiative Tuesday.

Robles expects the competition between the Carson and Inglewood stadium concepts to heat up in the coming weeks and months.

"I think it's going to get a little more personal," he said. "They're in front right now. If Carson moves ahead, I anticipate that they'll start lobbing claims."

Earlier Thursday, Grubman met jointly with Inglewood Mayor James T. Butts Jr. and representatives of the St. Louis Rams to discuss that proposed $1.86-billion stadium, also privately financed.

Asked what transpired in the meetings, Grubman declined to go into specifics but said, "For me, it was an opportunity to open a line of communication, and an opportunity for them to ask questions about the process."

Grubman said he wouldn't ask the public leaders to commit time to meet unless he thought these were "serious initiatives."
"It's as important for our process for us to know about the people and the progress at these sites, as it is for us to know about the people and the process in the home markets," he said.

The six owners who make up the league's Committee on Los Angeles Opportunities, chaired by Pittsburgh Steelers President Art Rooney, will hear presentations in New York next week from the owners backing the Inglewood and Carson proposals. The committee also will hear a presentation from St. Louis officials pitching a riverfront stadium there.

Grubman said St. Louis is the only home market making a presentation because it is making progress on a specific plan.



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"If there are other plans that could get done in a reasonable time frame, we will make arrangements for those to be presented," he said.

Also on Thursday, Tony Manolatos, spokesman for the San Diego mayor's stadium task force, reached out to committee members directly by email to keep them apprised of progress there.

"We understand how important the Chargers are to our community," Manolatos wrote. "The team has been here for 54 years and we want to ensure the San Diego Chargers are a member of the NFL family for at least another 50 years."

Grubman characterized the entire situation as "very fluid," both in terms of the home markets and the competing L.A. proposals.

"I've told all the home market participants and the two potential L.A. participants that we're all in the same situation, which is any clarity around one or more of the home markets can change everything for everybody," he said. "It isn't easy to work in an environment where so many balls are in the air, but that's just a fact of the process that we're in."

  

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Warren Coolidge
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84. "Stan Kroenke presents Inglewood plan to committee"
In response to Reply # 0
Wed Apr-22-15 09:36 PM by Warren Coolidge

  

          

http://www.latimes.com/sports/sportsnow/la-sp-sn-nfl-stadium-proposals-20150422-story.html

NFL hears proposals on Inglewood, Carson and St. Louis stadiums

Representatives of NFL stadium proposals in Inglewood, Carson and St. Louis made presentations in New York on Wednesday to a group of league executives and owners..

In attendance were the six owners who compose the Committee on Los Angeles Opportunities, chaired by Art Rooney II of the Pittsburgh Steelers, along with NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke is backing the Inglewood project, while St. Louis is making a proposal to keep the Rams there. The San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders have joined forces on a Carson alternative to Kroenke’s plan.

St. Louis went first, giving a half-hour presentation, followed by hourlong presentations by Kroenke and by the twosome of Chargers owner Dean Spanos and Raiders owner Mark Davis.

Representatives for Kroenke declined to comment on what took place at the meetings. The NFL declined to comment.

The Chargers and Raiders issued a joint statement, saying the goal of the presentation was to update owners on their site, which was entitled for a stadium Tuesday night by unanimous vote of the Carson City Council.

“In addition, we presented a new stadium design for L.A. that is the result of two months of close collaboration between the teams,” the statement read, noting Goldman Sachs representatives were at the meetings to answer questions about the financing plan. Also, the Raiders and Chargers gave an update on the situations in their home markets.

It's expected that the groups will give similar presentations to the ownership at large during meetings in San Francisco next month.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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85. "Stan Kroenke spending big dough in Inglewood already"
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http://www.latimes.com/sports/nfl/la-sp-nfl-stadium-costs-20150506-story.html

Costs of fast-tracking NFL stadium plans in Carson, Inglewood revealed

how much does it cost to get fast-track approval for an NFL football stadium?.

How about less than $2 million.

St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke spent $1.7 million to bankroll the ballot initiative for his stadium proposal in Inglewood, according to recently filed campaign finance reports. The San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders had spent $534,000 and counting by the end of March in their bid for a stadium in Carson. That was the total three weeks before that city's council voted to adopt the plan

Both projects used local ballot initiatives to skirt months of time-consuming environmental reviews that used to be standard in major development projects in California. After collecting enough signatures to qualify for the ballot, both cities gained approval from their local city councils and won full entitlements in a matter of weeks.

It gave both a decided advantage over the cities trying to keep the footloose franchises from fleeing for Los Angeles. The NFL could take relocation applications as soon as this fall.

AEG spent $27 million on a 10,000-page environmental impact report for its Farmers Field proposal in 2012, company officials estimate, and another $50 million on the now-scrapped project all told. While the Inglewood and Carson plans have many costs that aren't disclosed in campaign filings — from architects to lawyers to land deals — both saved similarly big bills because of a new state law that exempts projects proposed by ballot initiative from the environmental impact review process.

They did open up the checkbooks, though.

The Inglewood campaign — Citizens for Revitalizing the City of Champions — was funded almost entirely by the Kroenke Group, except for a $50,000 donation from his partners at Hollywood Park Land Co.

The group spent most of its money on signature-gathering, printed and online media, and consultants. There were expenditures of more than $600,000 to Century City-based ballot specialists Winner and Mandabach, and more than $500,000 to Calabasas signature-gathering firm PCI Consultants. It also furnished an office in Inglewood

Carson carried a lighter footprint, though the $534,000 sum probably will grow when April reports are filed. Carson2Gether, which is a 50-50 joint venture of the Chargers and Raiders, spent more than $120,000 on signature-gathering with Kimball Petition Management in Thousand Oaks, $79,000 with a Sacramento law firm that specializes in initiatives, and $55,000 on a "digital campaign" firm from Kennebunk, Maine.

It also spent $1,600 to hire the Los Angeles Fife and Drum Corps, which led a parade when 15,000 signatures were delivered to Carson City Hall in March. That effort could still face a referendum, which would force a public vote, though none has yet been filed.
Both campaigns cost peanuts compared to what the teams say they would like to spend on new stadiums, either of which would be the most expensive built in the U.S..

Kroenke's Inglewood plans are for a $1.86-billion stadium they would like to start to build in December, with or without a team. The Chargers and Raiders are proposing a $1.7-billion stadium in Carson, a price tag that could drop if just one team occupies it.



St. Louis' stadium authority has spent more than $800,000 developing a plan to keep the Rams, according to a recent report in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Unlike the Inglewood and Carson projects, St. Louis officials have said they are prepared to spend $400 million or more in public money on a stadium.

But that $800,000 spent so far on a plan to keep the Rams is less than half of what Kroenke has spent, just on a political campaign, to move St. Louis' team to Inglewood.


  

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Warren Coolidge
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86. "looks like st louis plans for new stadium coming to an end (swipe)"
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http://www.stlmag.com/news/sports/blocking%3A-legislators-file-new-lawsuit-that-could-stop-a-new/


The proposed riverfront stadium

If you’re a fan of building a new NFL stadium in St. Louis with the help of a half a billion public dollars, you’ve got a real problem today.

Six state legislators have filed a lawsuit to block Gov. Jay Nixon from using the existing authority of the St. Louis Regional Convention and Sports Complex Authority (STLRSA) to issue $250 million in state revenue bonds to support the project. This is not to be confused with a pending lawsuit over whether city voters should vote on local funding. This is far more serious.

The little-known STLRSA was established in 1988 through legislation signed by (of all people) Gov. John Ashcroft to provide a funding and ownership mechanism for expanding St. Louis’ Convention Center with a football stadium. The STLRSA owns the Edward Jones Dome, and it is the agency that issued the bonds that financed it—and eventually refinanced it—and those bonds are due to be paid off in 2021.

Nixon and his two-man “task force” of businessman Dave Peacock and attorney Bob Blitz have been counting on having the STLRSA simply extend the bonds—with no legislative action or approval—so that another $250 million can be raised to help finance a proposed $985 million NFL stadium. It’s the lynchpin of their funding plans.

I’m no legal scholar, but it’s hard to imagine that they can withstand this lawsuit. The intent of the statute was clearly to fund one football dome, not a series of football stadiums. It’s as clear as day in Missouri State Statute 67.650-67.658 RSMo:

“...any stadium, complex or facility newly constructed by the authority shall be suitable for multiple purposes and designed and constructed to meet National Football League franchise standards and shall be located adjacent to an existing convention facility.” (Emphasis added by me.)

The proposed new dome on the Mississippi River would be at least a 10-minute walk from the front of the Edward Jones Dome. That doesn’t qualify as “adjacent” by any common-sense definition. Still, I’ve been told by lawyers that the subject of “adjacency” is a matter of considerable case law and that if the issue boils down to that simple word, Nixon and other stadium proponents might prevail. Call it the legal equivalent of football’s “tuck rule.”

But there can be no denying one simple fact: The effect of using the STLRSA to fund a new stadium would be that Missouri state taxpayers would be obligated to retire more than $250 million in new debt service—for decades to come—for a new St. Louis stadium whose financing was not approved by any legislative process.

That’s not exactly democracy in action.

It wouldn’t take an activist judge to put an end to this plan. And if that happens, it’s curtains for a new NFL stadium in St. Louis, unless Nixon can persuade the state legislature—presumably in special session—to approve the financing directly. My guess is that if this were a political possibility, Nixon would have run the project through normal legislative channels in the past session.

Personally, I don’t think the stadium is happening in any case, because I doubt Rams owner Stan Kroenke will fail in his quest to return his team to Los Angeles to play in his proposed $1.8 billion palace there. And even if he’s denied by a competing plan in Carson, California, proposed by a partnership of the San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders, Kroenke would still retain nine one-year options for the Rams to play at the Edward Jones Dome on the sweetest lease in the league.

But if this lawsuit prevails, none of that will matter.

  

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ThaTruth
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87. "RE: looks like st louis plans for new stadium coming to an end (swipe)"
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http://www.bizjournals.com/stlouis/blog/2015/05/relocating-to-los-angeles-could-cost-rams-half-a.html

________________________________________
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Warren Coolidge
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88. "he's got the money...but the NFL is not going to "
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make a relocation fee too large to penalize the team moving.

Kroenke has the resources to make it work big here in LA and the NFL is not going to put major challenges in his way to make that happen.

  

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ThaTruth
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89. "Don't the other owners get to split that money? You think they're..."
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going to let Kroenke go print money in LA without paying a fee? Those dudes are like drug lords and Kroenke is going to have to pay for that corner

________________________________________
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Warren Coolidge
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90. "he'll pay a fee..but it won't be a big as people are saying"
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the league would not have let Kroenke go this far with Inglewood unless they were accepting of the idea that he was moving...

there is a ton of money the league is going to make from a return to LA and in particular the Inglewood project..

it's enough dough for er'body..and the league is going to make sure that the owner that returns to LA has the resources to make it work...and make it work big

  

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-DJ R-Tistic-
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91. "Hollywood Park grandstands implode in Inglewood"
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http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap3000000494844/article/hollywood-park-grandstands-implode-in-inglewood

------------------------------

50+ FREE Mixes on www.DJR-Tistic.com!

Twitter and Instagram - @DJ_RTistic

  

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Warren Coolidge
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92. "Kroenke will help Chargers and Raiders in their home markets"
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So the word is now that Kroenke wants any relocation fee to go towards helping the Chargers in San Diego and the Raiders in Oakland...


http://www.insidesocal.com/nfl/2015/06/10/nfl-what-to-expect-at-todays-committee-on-los-angeles-opportunities-meeting/



NFL: What to expect at today’s Committee on Los Angeles Opportunities meeting

Posted on June 10, 2015 by Vincent Bonsignore


The Rams and Chargers and Raiders will give updates to the NFL’s Committee on Los Angeles Opportunities about their local stadium situations and their stadium projects in Inglewood and Carson this afternoon in New York.

While part of the updates will involve what’s going on in St. Louis and San Diego and Oakland, make no mistake, this is about selling Inglewood or Carson as the site the NFL should chose for its triumphant return to Los Angeles.

And with the league closing in on a decision about who will relocate to Los Angeles by the end of 2015 – and at what site – the Rams and Chargers and Raiders will undoubtedly be selling their L.A. dreams today.

For the Rams, that means pushing owner Stan Kroenke’s Inglewood stadium site.

For the Raiders and Chargers, it’s extolling the virtues of the joint stadium they are proposing in Carson should new homes not emerge in Oakland and Dan Diego.

And what does that mean, exactly?

The Rams strategy appears to be selling their site and their long history in Los Angeles as insuring a successful return to Los Angeles, while also being willing participants in helping the Chargers and Raiders secure financially beneficial new stadiums and futures.

With a ready made fan base in L.A., the financial mite of a multi-billionaire owner, and an extravagant stadium on a site Los Angeles fans are familiar with, the Rams will push their plan as the best bet for the NFL’s re-entry into the second-biggest market in the country after a 20-year absence.

The thinking is clear: The NFL has one shot to get it right in L.A. and that’s the Rams in Inglewood. And with room to add another team, either the Chargers or Raiders can be brought on. Once that mission is completed, attention will turn to insuring the third team’s objectives are met.

As for the Chargers and Raiders sales pitch, longtime NFL executive Carmen Policy will lead the presentation. He gave me a preview of his update – which you can read here – and the basis is that Carson offers a solution to two California teams stadium situations. And they will do it as partners in a two-teamed owned stadium

As Policy told me:

“The NFL has been saying since I’ve been involved with NFL committees involved in L.A., whenever the NFL returns to L.A. it will do so with plans to bring two teams. There position is, eventually there will be two teams in L.A. Everything we have studied, everything we have looked at, says if you are going to bring two teams to L.A. the wise, most prudent, most strategic thinking to do is to bring them to L.A. at the same time. Part of that is marketing, but more importantly, we have found that the concept of owner-team, tenant-team doesn’t work. All it does is breed complexity, conflict and sometimes even contempt. One team will always be viewed as the home team. The other team is viewed as the team paying rent. So from the outset, you do it correctly so you aren’t building a stadium that the owner designs and oh, by the way, I’ll make accommodations for the second team and their idea of accommodations is putting in extra locker rooms.

“Look at the 49ers, that’s their stadium. They designed it. Everything about that stadium speaks to the 49ers and their ownership. They did design it in a way that you could say it accommodates a second team. But that second team wouldn’t just be a secondary tenant, they’d feel it all the way through and you couldn’t help but operate it in a fashion that reflects that.

“Here we are with a chance to take two California teams, in the two worst stadium situations in the NFL – they’re in trouble – and you can cure that with one move and build a spectacular building that each of those teams own. And it’s in the perfect available spot in L.A.

“If you just follow the logic, it pushes you to a logical conclusion. And we believe that is Carson.”

Making that case continues today in New York. Down the road, all 32 owners will gather for a special meeting in Chicago August 11 to hear the latest updates to that point.

And at some point after that, the NFL will get down to the business of deciding what team or teams will relocate to Los Angeles, and where they will play.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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93. "St Louis NFL market study leaked..."
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the business journal had an article up this afternoon...obviously the article upset some folks because now the journal has taken down the story...but it was up long enough for people to get the info...

pretty damning stuff for st Louis

so much so that not only has the original business journal article been taken down, the only stories about this coming out of st Louis omit some extremely damning info...

such as : "Twenty-eight percent of current premium buyers said they would not follow through on purchases. That group represents $95 million in license revenue, according to the study. Sixty-three percent of current occasional ticket buyers would not follow through on purchases. And 29 percent of season ticket holders would not follow through."


"The Rams rank in the bottom third of the NFL in terms of average season ticket price (22nd) and average club seat price (28th),and have the fourth lowest average attendance in the NFL over the past five(5) years."

oh.... the article has been deleted, but the link to a pdf of the market findings is still active

http://media.bizj.us/view/img/6387942/nfl-commissioned-study-stl.pdf



  

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Tiger Woods
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94. "but they suck...should the numbers be better?"
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Warren Coolidge
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95. "the market study gives some pretty detailed numbers"
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that go beyond a reflection of the product on the field..

but regardless..

the Rams got some 7-9.....6-9-1 in recent years....with their #1 overall pick QB missing basically 2 years.... and with one of the best young defenses in the NFL.... that should be enough to get the team out of the basement in home attendance..

there are a lot of young non-playoff teams that aren't in the lower half of home attendance, so there is not necessarily a direct correlation

http://espn.go.com/nfl/attendance

the big things in the market study though..the fact that such a large percentage of current PSL and ticket holders do not plan to continue supporting the team....and demographic wise, there isn't a large pool of individual or corporate partners to build for the future...

even having some of the lowest ticket prices in the NFL didn't improve the home attendance.

  

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ThaTruth
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96. "NFL apparently having trouble finding temporary venues in L.A.(link)"
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http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/08/04/nfl-apparently-having-trouble-finding-temporary-venues-in-l-a/

________________________________________
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Warren Coolidge
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97. "they only need 1 venue...and the Coliseum is open for it"
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pretty sure Pat Haden has already had discussions with his former team

  

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Marauder21
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98. "They've already sold naming rights to the St Louis stadium?"
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I thought that plan was nearly dead. What happened?

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Selassie I God
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99. " San Diego Chargers will file for relocation to Los Angeles in January"
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Sat Oct-24-15 06:27 PM by Selassie I God

  

          

Not "new news" but they went there first...


http://www.si.com/nfl/2015/10/24/san-diego-chargers-relocation-los-angeles?xid=si_social

The San Diego Chargers will file for relocation to Los Angeles when the NFL opens the application window in January, Mark Fabiani told The Mighty 1090 AM radio show.

“At this point yes, because there's no sign that the other team or teams are not going to file,” said Fabiani, who serves as the Chargers’ special counsel. “Everyone assumes all three teams will file, and in that case we can't afford to lose our market in Los Angeles and Orange County.”

____
Some will tell you that they love you but they've got an ulterior motive - Oh what a shame
They will tell you that they need you but they've got an ulterior motive - Personal gain

(c) Luciano


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Warren Coolidge
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100. "not really the first to file..."
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nobody can file right now... the window to file hasn't opened yet...

but look at what dude said..

"“At this point yes, because there's no sign that the other team or teams are not going to file,” said Fabiani, who serves as the Chargers’ special counsel. “Everyone assumes all three teams will file, and in that case we can't afford to lose our market in Los Angeles and Orange County.”


He didn't say they were filing to relocate to LA....he said he was filing because he knows the Rams are going to file and he wants to protect "their market" in la and oc...


he's saying they'll file to try and block the Rams..

that's much different than what Kroenke and the Rams are doing...

Kroenke will file to relocate when the window is open because he's building a stadium in Inglewood, and he plans to move the Rams there.

The Rams will have the only stadium project ready to break ground when the relocation window opens...it's the stadium project that is the preferred choice by the league office...everything will be ready to roll....

The Chargers on the other hand have the Carson project. Several months ago the Carson city council approved bonds for 100 Million that would fund the completion of the toxic clean up of the Carson land. To this point, they haven't gotten anyone to purchase the bonds yet...thus the clean up hasn't been funded and has not begun. That clean up will take 18 months to 2 years....

when the window opens...both the Rams and Chargers will apply...but the Rams will be the only ones who have a stadium project ready to go.


  

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Warren Coolidge
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101. "Eric Grubmann:"St louis will come up short""
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https://soundcloud.com/101sports/eric-grubman-joins-bernie-to

interview this morning he's basically saying that St Louis last ditch stadium proposal will come up short and Kroenke wants out.

it's big because this is really the NFL rep officially beginning to close the door on the Rams in St Louis.

  

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Kungset
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Wed Dec-09-15 11:42 AM

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102. "Disney CEO Bob Iger on board with Carson project"
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for those of you that forgot, Disney owns ESPN. big move.

i was undecided previously, but i think i'm rooting for my home town to get the team. let's do it - put us on the map.

http://www.latimes.com/sports/nfl/la-sp-sn-nfl-carson-bob-iger-disney-20151111-story.html

In the pitched battle to return the National Football League to Los Angeles, the proposed stadium in Carson seemed to face a difficult path.

The $1.7-billion project backed by the San Diego Chargers and Oakland Raiders would be built on top of a former landfill and its planning lagged behind a rival proposal in Inglewood. But on Wednesday, Carson made a bold move to elevate its standing in the stadium competition.

The Chargers and Raiders appointed Disney Chairman and CEO Robert Iger to oversee their effort should the owners choose the Carson project over the Inglewood stadium backed by St. Louis Rams owner Stan Kroenke.

Iger heads one of the most successful entertainment companies in the world. Disney also owns ESPN, a television partner with the NFL.

Carmen Policy, a former NFL executive who now serves as executive director of Carson Holdings, the joint venture between the Chargers and Raiders, called the addition of Iger a “game-changer.

“We now have the kind of leadership and expertise that should calm any concerns about any NFL teams going into L.A. and getting off on the right foot and pursuing the right course,” Policy said. “Who could we get to better guarantee fan experience than the man who runs ‘the happiest place on earth?'”

Iger would be chairman of Carson Holdings and would continue to serve as chairman and CEO of Disney under the terms of his contract.

The NFL held committee meetings at league headquarters Wednesday and at least one owner questioned the impact of the hiring.

“Smart guy, very capable. But I don't know how he relates to football,” New York Jets owner Woody Johnson said.

It will take three-quarters of the 32 team owners to approve any relocation to L.A.

See the most-read stories in Sports this hour >>
Johnson and San Francisco 49ers owner Jed York wouldn't guarantee that owners would vote on relocation in January. Johnson shrugged and said “could be” when asked if it might happen at the league's annual owners meetings in March.

The Iger move was viewed by some as window dressing for a project that isn't expected to be ready until 2018.

In Inglewood, the stadium design is complete and developers are securing permits to begin construction should it be approved by owners.

Inglewood Mayor James T. Butts Jr. commended Iger's experience, but remained confident his city's stadium project is best positioned to quickly deliver a venue.

“No other project has progressed beyond a graphical representation of what their project might look like,” Butts said. “By every realistic performance benchmark, I feel Inglewood's project stands alone.”

While the Carson backers were touting Iger's involvement, the Inglewood developers were digesting a preliminary report they received this week from the Federal Aviation Administration that said their stadium could interfere with radar at Los Angeles International Airport. The 27-page document suggested various remedies, among them moving the stadium, significantly reducing its height, or coating parts of the structure in a radar-absorbing material.

Inglewood developers characterized the report as an expected part of the process, and not a significant obstacle that would derail the stadium plan.

Several owners have privately decided which of the two projects they intend to support. Carolina Panthers owner Jerry Richardson, a member of the Los Angeles committee, told reporters Wednesday that he supports the Carson plan.

The uncommitted owners are now being lobbied behind the scenes by the two camps, each of which likely has the requisite nine votes to block the other.

Members of the Los Angeles, stadium and finance committees heard presentations from St. Louis, San Diego and Oakland. Last month, the NFL staged town hall meetings in those cities to allow fans to voice their questions and concerns to league executives.

Among the representatives in attendance Wednesday on behalf of their home markets were San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf, and Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon.

“The owners got to hear directly from us the strong commitment, the political commitment, the community commitment to get this done in San Diego,” said Faulconer, who urged the owners to give the city until June, when it would have an initiative for $350 million in public financing on the ballot. The city is proposing a new venue in Mission Valley on the site of the current Qualcomm Stadium.

Proposed NFL stadium in Inglewood faces FAA scrutiny over height, effects on radar
Proposed NFL stadium in Inglewood faces FAA scrutiny over height, effects on radar
“Everybody in that room was fully engaged. We talked about timing on an environmental impact report, timing on city and county actions, and I talked a lot about the momentum we have here in San Diego and my commitment as mayor.”

Schaaf and three other Oakland representatives left league headquarters without commenting.

Still, the talk in New York revolved around Iger.

The addition of Iger “says very strongly that an NFL return to the Los Angeles market is incredibly attractive,” said Eric Grubman, an NFL executive vice president and the league's point man on L.A.

“When a man of his stature, capability and talent is drawn to this, it really says something.”

Sam Farmer reported from New York and Nathan Fenno from Los Angeles.

Times staff writer Richard Winton contributed to this report.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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103. "the NFL is working with Oakland on a stadium (swipe)"
In response to Reply # 102


  

          

the league is basically formulating their desired outcome here.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2015/12/08/nfl-offers-to-help-oakland-develop-a-plan-for-new-stadium-there/

NFL offers to help Oakland develop a plan for new stadium there

Posted by Darin Gantt on December 8, 2015, 6:12 AM EST

As the NFL continues to play musical chairs in Los Angeles (while never stopping the music for 21 years), they may actually be trying to add chairs now.

Via Matthew Artz of the Contra Costa Times, a top league executive said the league was willing to help Oakland work toward a new stadium near the site of their existing decrepit one.

Of course, it would be impossible to create a deal before the league’s new Dec. 30 deadline for teams to file relocation bids, but it’s at least some degree of indication the league is willing to work with the Raiders to help create a soft landing if they don’t end up in L.A.

Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf said she was “generally aware” of the NFL’s interest in helping, saying: “While we have not yet engaged in any specific discussions, we will certainly keep this in mind as we evaluate the options and tools for getting to a responsible proposal that works for all the stakeholders.”

Eric Grubman, the league’s L.A. point man, said the help being offered is no different than what San Diego or St. Louis would be offered to create a bid, but he said the league was open to looking at development opportunities there.

“We have for several years stated: ‘Don’t put a real estate developer between the Raiders and the city. If there is development value available, talk to the Raiders about it, or perhaps the Raiders plus league,’ ” Grubman said in an email.

He also pointed out the league has “maintained an active dialogue with the city, and that we would try to be helpful in figuring out how to take advantage of development rights so long as the Raiders were interested in what was being proposed.”

With three teams trying for at most two spots, someone is going to be left out at the end of this process, and while the Raiders have teamed up with the Chargers on the Carson bid, they’re viewed as a tagger-on rather than an integral component, and the possibility of a Rams-Chargers partnership somewhere has gained traction in some precincts.

  

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Kungset
Member since Mar 29th 2004
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Wed Dec-09-15 02:54 PM

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104. "i agree that Inglewood has the advantage right now"
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but there's not a lot, to say the least, in this article

  

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Warren Coolidge
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105. "Rams, Chargers and RAiders all file to relocate"
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http://www.stlouisrams.com/news-and-events/article-1/Rams-File-for-Relocation/436f56d8-b5c0-4e0a-a3b2-a8bf22408c30


Rams release a 2 sentence statement on their application to relocate:

“The St. Louis Rams informed the National Football League today that the Rams propose to relocate to the greater Los Angeles metropolitan area. The relocation would be effective for the 2016 NFL League Year.”

Kroenke a cold piece...

  

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Warren Coolidge
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106. "Rams official relocation application (link)"
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http://media.trb.com/media/acrobat/2016-01/23763808665200-05180540.pdf

some pretty interesting stuff in here

  

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dillinjah
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107. "congrats fam"
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calminvasion
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109. "Yeah, congrats WC"
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Marauder21
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Tue Jan-12-16 10:42 PM

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108. "I feel for fans in St Louis"
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I know what it's like to lose a team to a bigger market, almost lose a team to a smaller market and almost see a team get contracted. This sucks for the fans in St. Louis that put up with a lot of shit over the last decade. They don't deserve this.

But I'm legit happy for WC tonight. Dude hung with the team after they moved, stuck around during bad times, held out hope they'd come back. He deserves to party on this tonight. Congrats and enjoy this.

------

12 play and 12 planets are enlighten for all the Aliens to Party and free those on the Sex Planet-maxxx

XBL: trkc21
Twitter: @tyrcasey

  

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Warren Coolidge
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111. "thanks fellas.... "
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lol..

yeah this is crazy...

  

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Warren Coolidge
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110. "Man.... i'm honestly just shocked right now..."
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I've been pretty confident this was going to happen for a while....I've followed this shit to the point of almost obsession for the last couple of years..

but man...

It's almost unbelievable this has happened...

I would have never thought this would happen....really not a big deal because either way I'm always going to be a Rams fan...

but the Los Angeles Rams..

unbelievable....

lol..

I'll talk more about this later..... kind of in a daze right now...

I went to tell my mother that the Rams were moving back to Los Angeles ... Moms has dementia... when I told her she said, "your daddy used to take to see the Rams"

he sure did...

  

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adg87
Member since Jun 22nd 2003
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Fri Jan-15-16 01:11 AM

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113. "Coolidge, u and TT are the first cats I thought of."
In response to Reply # 110
Fri Jan-15-16 01:14 AM by adg87

  

          

Can't stand the Rams, but STL don't deserve this. Kurt Warner was dropping truth on AZ radio today. Just sad man.Curious to know how the STL fans feel. Glad to hear you rep them cats regardless.

************************************************************

Nigga, if the shoe fits, then buy the matching purse!" Rass Kass

  

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Warren Coolidge
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Fri Jan-15-16 12:18 PM

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114. "it is messed up for St Louis fans...."
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I feel for them.....losing a team isn't cool...been there..

There are some good fans in St Louis ....decent folks.... over the last couple of years with the potential of relocation hanging over them..there was some ugliness though...as much as I understand the frustration, there was a lot of really insulting stuff coming from some St Louis fans...for a lot of them I think losing the Rams to a Black city like Inglewood made it even worse for them... there was a lot of really disgusting insults tossed towards LA from St Louis fans recently...still is now... as much as I can understand them being hurt by this, it crossed the line in a lot of ways...

You know I've been a Rams fan for my entire life... I can have all the empathy in the world for st Louis fans who are decent people, but I'm not going to act like I didn't want back a team I've been pulling for since I was 5 years old...

it's just a tough situation... I know a lot of St Louis fans who are going to remain Ram fans... nowadays it's not really necessary to live in the same city as your favorite team...

but yeah... my man Truth...I feel for you man...for real.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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115. "New Inglewood stadium renderings"
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http://urbanize.la/post/shiny-new-rende ... od-stadium

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OMZGkJxb0Ro

  

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LA2Philly
Member since Oct 18th 2004
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Sat Jan-30-16 12:56 PM

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116. "Chargers reach agreement to share stadium in 2017"
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IF a long-term solution in SD isn't sorted out by the end of 2016. Spanos leveraging hard as shit, should be interesting to see how much SD is willing to cave.

---------------------------------
<--The drought is over

"have fun reveling in your pettiness tho" (C) Dula summing up 98% of OKS

"I didnt finish a damn thing...matter of fact I jerked off after she left."
-Kobe speaking to investigators

L D E A

  

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Warren Coolidge
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117. "Spanos and Fabiani are so full of it..."
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there were no real "negotiations" between the Chargers and Rams. The deal was already put together at the Houston meeting. The Chargers don't have to money to be partners in Inglewood..all they could do is be a tenant...

they'll end up staying in San Diego in the long run..


all Spanos did was try and block Kroenke and try and get leverage with San Diego..he never had the cheese to make a power move in LA.

  

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Warren Coolidge
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118. "Los Angeles Rams going to the Super Bowl...."
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hell of a ride....and we get a rematch with the Patriots....


  

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dillinjah
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119. "A nice update into how things are going (link, it's long AF):"
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https://www.espn.com/nfl/story/_/id/28117460/inside-rams-chargers-marriage-nfl-fights-los-angeles

Seth WickershamDon Van Natta Jr.


THE SKELETON OF a stadium sits at the center of a construction site three times the size of Disneyland. It is a futuristic mass of steel and concrete that appears to have both risen from the earth and descended from space. SoFi Stadium -- the name sounds from the ether -- will house a football field 100 feet below ground level and is surrounded by mammoth mounds of excavated Inglewood, California, soil piled like peaks in a range around the development. When it opens next summer, its backers hope SoFi will mark the end of one NFL era in Los Angeles -- defined by rotting venues and teams that have drifted in and out over 73 years -- and the beginning of another. The $5 billion-plus project will feature a translucent roof that appears to hover above the stadium, as if allowing it to breathe, and will be home to 298 acres of retail space, including a theater, a concert venue and a new NFL Media headquarters. Now, though, seven days a week, it is surrounded by cranes and trucks and an army of hustling workers in white construction helmets bearing the logos of two home teams: the Los Angeles Rams and the Los Angeles Chargers, an arranged marriage of clubs whose high-level executives barely speak with one another.

EDITOR'S PICKS

Inside the NFL's wild return to LA

Sin City or Bust: How the Raiders went Vegas, baby
SEPARATED BY MINUTES, Dean Spanos and Stan Kroenke walk into a Ritz-Carlton ballroom in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. It's the final day of the NFL's fall owners meeting in mid-October. Spanos, in khakis and a navy blazer, arrives first, with commissioner Roger Goodell. Spanos is a conservative, risk-averse man whose Chargers are still trying to get on the radar in L.A. Kroenke, tall and thin with a thick mustache, follows shortly after in a black suit, black dress shirt and black sunglasses. The Rams' owner is a shrewd real estate mogul who has found changing the Los Angeles sports landscape more challenging and expensive than he'd imagined. Both L.A. teams suffered losses the previous weekend. The Rams drew an announced crowd of 75,695 to the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, but it was half-empty at kickoff and contained so many San Francisco 49ers fans that the Rams' offense was forced to use a silent snap count. The Chargers, on national television against the Pittsburgh Steelers at the 25,300-seat Dignity Health Sports Park in Carson, 16 miles south of downtown L.A., felt as if they were playing on the road -- again. Steelers fans either outnumbered Chargers fans or came close, as did Denver Broncos fans at the prior home game, as did Houston Texans fans at the home game before that, as did Indianapolis Colts fans in the season opener. In the fourth quarter against the Steelers, the opening of the Styx song "Renegade," a Steelers anthem, blared from the stadium's sound system, the setup to a failed Chargers joke that got the visiting fans even rowdier. Overhead, as with most Chargers home games, a plane dragged a banner that read: "Impeach Dean Spanos."

L.A. has always been a Lakers town. On a cool September evening in Chavez Ravine, you'd be forgiven for thinking it's a Dodgers town. When Wayne Gretzky arrived in 1988, the Kings joined the mix, and when USC was hot under Pete Carroll more than a decade ago, the city became a college football capital. Was it ever an NFL town? If so, can it still be? Something strange happened in the 21 seasons between when the Rams and Raiders left after the 1994 season, and when the Rams returned in 2016. Angelenos, burned by a league that seemed to view the city more as a focus-grouped market than a layered and complicated region, showed little desire for a team of their own.

Jerry Jones thought he could win them over. Now 77, the Dallas Cowboys' owner and Hall of Famer is the NFL's most powerful person and maybe the most influential power broker in American sports. He has been the most passionate evangelist for the NFL to make a splashy return to Los Angeles, the city where he was born, envisioning a near-future with more money in it for everybody. In 2015, the Rams' Inglewood project, then estimated to cost $1.86 billion, was competing against a Chargers-Raiders $1.8 billion option in Carson. Few outside the NFL knew it, but Jones positioned himself to profit from either proposal. Concessions for either project -- and the construction, in the case of Inglewood -- would be managed by Legends, the company co-owned by Jones and the Steinbrenner family. The competition between the proposals was bloody and toxic given the high stakes, pitting owners against one another. Ultimately, Jones sided with Kroenke because his stadium and project proposal had what Jones called the wow factor. "We had good insight on its vision," Jacksonville Jaguars owner Shad Khan says. "It was spectacular."

New L.A. Stadium
LA StadiumThe 70,000-seat, open-air facility that will be shared by the Rams and the Chargers in Inglewood is the centerpiece of a $2.6 billion, 298-acre development.

• Photos, videos from a media tour of the construction site
• Chargers' Dean Spanos: 'It's like a city being built right in front of you'

At an owners meeting in a posh Houston hotel in January 2016, Jones helped to resolve the L.A. relocation scrum by persuading fellow owners to endorse a compromise that he had sold as a blueprint for success. Two teams would return to Los Angeles: the Rams -- and, if they chose, the Chargers. The red flags that are obvious now were visible then. League research indicated neither the Rams nor the Chargers had an overwhelming reservoir of support in the L.A. region, with fewer local fans than the Patriots, Steelers, Packers, Cowboys and even the Raiders, according to some team and league studies. What's more, the accommodation wouldn't make the Rams and Chargers equal partners, like the Jets and Giants at MetLife Stadium, which the teams jointly built with private funds. Kroenke -- one of the NFL's wealthiest team owners, worth an estimated $9.7 billion -- would pay to build the stadium, perhaps the only option in California, whose legislators and voters rarely approve a single public dollar for new stadiums. Spanos, a long-respected owner with a reputation for putting the league first, would be given the first option to be Kroenke's tenant, for $1 a year, and if the Chargers decided to remain in San Diego, the Raiders could join the Rams in L.A. -- an outcome nobody around the league wanted, owing to Al Davis' burned bridges and the co-opting of team apparel by gangs.

Almost all owners believed Jones' resolution to be the best business decision among the available options, and most supported it under the cover of a secret ballot, which allowed them to vote for Inglewood without Spanos knowing who had turned on him.

Spanos felt burned and betrayed by the vote and the entire L.A. decision process, and therefore few expected him to exercise the tenancy option. But he did, and now these unequal partners are locked in a bitter fight, stoked by Kroenke's fury over cost overruns exceeding $3 billion, questions over the Chargers' long-term viability in the market, a lawsuit seeking billions over Kroenke's departure from St. Louis that has engulfed the entire league, and an increasingly fractious and sometimes petty civil war between Rams and Chargers officials, according to documents and nearly two dozen interviews with owners, league and team executives, and lawyers.

SoFi Stadium has become a vessel for each figure's motivations and goals, and a repository for the hopes and vanities of the NFL. Spanos wants to secure once and for all his family's fortunes and establish his team as more than an NFL version of the second-rate Clippers, embarrassment and awkwardness over being Kroenke's tenant be damned. Kroenke is driven by the chance to build a monumental legacy for both himself and the NFL, despite the huge bill. Jones wants what he always wants: for the league to flex, show off and "grow the pie" of annual league revenues now edging toward $17 billion a year -- and to walk away with a healthy cut. But SoFi Stadium is also a bet -- a multibillion-dollar wager that in a market of 22 million, the world's most spectacular stadium will inspire 70,000 people to show up every Sunday and cheer. For two teams.

A PHONE CALL between Kroenke and Goodell in the autumn of 2015 was a harbinger for the current impasse. On Nov. 4, Kroenke was on his cellphone on the small patio of The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf in the heart of Beverly Hills. The secret ballot in Houston was still two months away, and the Carson project seemed to be gaining traction with owners, mostly out of loyalty to Spanos, who believed at the time he was close to the votes he needed. Kroenke was willing to do whatever it took to return the Rams to L.A. -- including partnering with Spanos. "I want you in L.A. with Stan," Jones had told Spanos. Normally quiet and reserved, Kroenke was hot.

"No. No! No, Roger!" Kroenke said. "I've been out there, spending millions, and everybody else is piggybacking on everything I've done, not spending a dime, letting me take all the heat, and then they think they're going to get to step in? I don't think so."

"I've been out there, spending millions, and everybody else is piggybacking on everything I've done, not spending a dime."
Stan Kroenke
The call continued for 10 minutes, until Kroenke realized people were staring at him. He stood up and said, "Roger, we're going to have to continue this conversation in a few seconds. I need to get somewhere a bit more private to discuss some of the things I need to say to you next."

The following month in San Francisco, Spanos dined with a small group of owners who were convinced his project would prevail. "We got you," said Jerry Richardson, the Carolina Panthers' then-owner who had tried to bully owners to vote for Carson. They raised a glass, and Richardson spent the rest of the dinner trashing Kroenke. But Richardson had overestimated his power of intimidation -- and underestimated Jones' persistent charm. Twenty-four hours before the vote in Houston, Spanos walked into a conference room where a clutch of owners had been deliberating. On a whiteboard, the two options that had been on the table for a year -- "STAN/LA" and "CHARGERS-RAIDERS/CARSON" -- were crossed out. A new option, a Jones-driven last-minute compromise, had appeared: "STAN-DEAN/LA." Spanos knew he had lost.

Before the secret ballots were counted, Colts owner Jim Irsay pulled Spanos aside and said, "This is for the best."


Chargers owner Dean Spanos believed his proposal to build a stadium in Carson would prevail just 24 hours before a secret ballot went against him. AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster
FEW IN THE league felt that way a year later, especially Spanos. In December 2016, he stood before a room of owners and league executives at the Four Seasons in Irving, Texas, looking like a man who had lost much more than a vote. He was 66 and at the low point of his 22 years running the Chargers. After losing to Kroenke, he had returned to San Diego and lost again, blowing $15 million on a long-shot ballot initiative for a new stadium, destroying any remaining goodwill and trust with a loyal fan base. A broken man, Spanos was out of options.

"I don't want to go to L.A.," Spanos said. "I want to stay."

Many owners sympathized with Spanos, but some were also frustrated by him. The league's $550 million relocation fee that Spanos would need to spend to move to L.A. might have been better invested in a new stadium in San Diego, where the Chargers would collect most of the revenue. Why move to a city that showed little interest in them? "It wasn't rational," a high-level league source says.

But Spanos had his own rationale, frustrated by years of wars with San Diego officials over public financing for a new stadium. The league-first guy was gone. He was determined to do what was best for his club and for his family, several of whom worked for the team, and in L.A. he saw "a favorable, low-risk deal," a Spanos confidant says. In L.A., the value of Spanos' team might increase by $1 billion from the Forbes-estimated $2.08 billion value it had in San Diego in 2016. He'd play in a glistening new park, with no stadium debt. His biggest expense would be the $550 million relocation fee, and Spanos intended to borrow to pay it.

After the Irving league meeting, brass from the Chargers and Rams met with league executives and lawyers for a series of negotiations to finalize the term sheet, whose broad stipulations were set by owners and league executives the night before the secret relocation vote. Spanos and Kroenke, both of whom declined to comment for this story, had enjoyed a strange relationship, both cool and occasionally friendly, once playing gin rummy together on a private jet a decade ago. But the term-sheet sessions were awkward and "the body language horrible," according to one attendee. Spanos and his executives surprised Rams officials by drawing a hard line, demanding a cut of all revenue streams, input over design elements, and approval over all decisions made by Legends and by StadCo L.A. LLC, the stadium company controlled by Kroenke. Rams officials tried to be cordial, but they seethed. The way they saw it, Spanos had the entire Southern California market to himself for 21 seasons with little to show for it, but now he felt entitled to a chunk of revenue on a project to which he would contribute one dollar a year. Says one high-level executive involved in the negotiations: "The Rams felt like Stan was taking all this risk and would appreciate it if Dean would recognize what he was bringing to the table."

"I don't want to go to L.A. I want to stay."
Dean Spanos
Spanos was keenly aware of the imbalance, but he also knew the league, a trade association at heart, would ensure him a share of stadium cashflow enjoyed by other teams. The Chargers ended up with a sizable 15% share of all revenue streams, including joint luxury suite sales, sponsorships and SoFi Stadium's naming rights, which is estimated at more than $600 million over 20 years.

Spanos also won a major concession on the most divisive issue: stadium seat licenses, the tens of thousands of dollars NFL teams often charge for the right to buy season tickets. All the revenue from both teams' sale of SSLs would go to Kroenke to help defray the cost of the stadium. But per the term sheet, the Chargers neither had to meet a revenue target nor even sell a single SSL. All the Chargers had to do was try to sell the SSLs, at whatever cost they determined, until one year after the stadium opened, after which they wouldn't even have to try to sell any.

The NFL sets SSL targets for all teams, often forcing owners to open escrow accounts through the league as part of a complicated process to ensure that no owner defaults on stadium debt. League research had predicted that the Chargers and Rams could each sell $400 million in SSLs, but because Kroenke was paying for the stadium himself, neither the Chargers nor the Rams were required by the league to meet those sales targets. While there were no penalties if the teams failed to hit the goal -- all involved were careful not to violate antitrust laws -- the Rams expected the Chargers to reach the $400 million mark as a way to contribute to their new home. The terms were favorable to Spanos, and Kroenke had little choice but to accept them. League executives wanted the Chargers to have a friendly deal -- and also knew that in the long run the Inglewood stadium and project would probably appreciate by billions, making Kroenke's investment more than worthwhile. Kroenke took Spanos at his word that the Chargers would be a full partner, while aware that Spanos had no financial incentive or obligation to help. It was a fragile trust forged by two teams suspicious of each other.

On Jan. 18, 2017, the Chargers held a fan rally at the Forum in Inglewood to officially announce the move to L.A. Only a small section of the arena was open, and it was nowhere close to full. On a huge screen, Chargers highlights played, accompanied by the soundtrack from "Top Gun," which was set in San Diego. Superstar quarterback Philip Rivers looked dour on stage, like a child who had been dragged to a party by his parents, and would later proudly refuse to move his family to L.A. Twice, Goodell praised Kroenke, who was not in attendance, and his vision for the palatial new stadium before mentioning Spanos, who was seated nearest to the commissioner. When it was Spanos' turn to speak, he surveyed the scarce and scattered Chargers fans. "This is surreal!" he said. A group of fans flipped him off.


Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, shown with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell and Rams owner Stan Kroenke before an NFC divisional playoff game last January, has always believed in the transformative power of a stadium. Ric Tapia via AP Photo
JERRY JONES HAS always believed in the transformative power of a new home, having witnessed it firsthand when he went big on AT&T Stadium. In 2009, Jerry World opened in Arlington, Texas, and a decade later it still shines with a modern, fresh-paint gleam. Jones even believes in the transformative power of a practice facility. He turned The Star, the Cowboys' training center, into an entire football ecosystem, with high-rise apartments, restaurants and a high-end club. How big can the NFL become? Jones loves to test his own "tolerance for ambiguity," as he often says. But L.A. is not North Texas in its hunger for the NFL and he knew it. To get L.A. fans off their phones and into a stadium, Jones told everyone that the league had to build something unforgettable. At an August 2015 owners meeting, Jones said Kroenke was the only one who had the "big balls" requisite to reintroduce the league after two decades away. This year, at least half a dozen owners and team executives have toured the new stadium. "It's going to be a phenomenal building," 49ers CEO Jed York says. "It's going to be a place that you need to see a game."

Problem was, the Rams couldn't move right into their new stadium after the relocation vote, forcing them into a holding pattern until it opened. They tried to market their homecoming after 21 years in St. Louis by dusting off throwback uniforms and the team's classic "Whose house? Rams house!" chant. A crowd of 91,046 showed up in September 2016 for the first regular-season home game, a win over the Seattle Seahawks. But the Rams learned that just because fans show up doesn't mean they root for the home team, especially if it's a loser. They finished 4-12. After less than a year in L.A., the reboot required a reboot. The team fired longtime head coach Jeff Fisher, and in January 2017, Kroenke signed Redskins offensive coordinator Sean McVay as head coach, a perfect West L.A. combination of precocious and attractive. Still, league executives were worried. McVay was only 30, the youngest head coach in modern NFL history. If he failed, the entire return to L.A. might too.

McVay didn't fail. He led the Rams to the playoffs in 2017 against the Atlanta Falcons, a game at the Coliseum that sold out in less than a week. In November 2018, the Rams appeared to break through for good at the Coliseum on Monday Night Football against the Kansas City Chiefs. Jay Z, Robin Thicke and Goodell were in attendance. The Coliseum was packed and electric. Quarterbacks Jared Goff and Patrick Mahomes combined for 891 total yards and 10 touchdown passes. The Rams' 54-51 win felt like something real, a connection between a city and a team after years of stops and starts with various clubs that used Los Angeles as leverage to build new stadiums in their home markets. The Rams shot up 9% in local TV ratings after that Monday night, a bump that continued as they reached the Super Bowl. But there was no second bump. This year, the Rams are less exciting and less dominant, with uneven fan support. Against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers on Sept. 29, a photo went viral of a mostly empty Coliseum at kickoff. It was ugly, and it served as a reminder to Chargers executives that no matter how embarrassing their team's own crowds are, L.A. is still up for grabs.


Chargers home games at Dignity Health Sports Park in Carson, California, have often seemed like road games for the L.A. team. Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images
OF COURSE, JUST because L.A. is up for grabs doesn't mean the Chargers are well positioned to grab it. In 2017, the Chargers also tried to reinvent themselves upon returning to the city where they last played in 1960. They went small. For a temporary home, they chose a soccer stadium in the middle of the California State University, Dominguez Hills campus, shaving its 27,000 seats to 25,300. The idea was to start fresh by offering a premium experience and, not incidentally, premium ticket prices. League executives loved the idea: an entirely new experience of fans climbing fences to get in. Spanos hosted pregame parties for family and friends not in a walled-off suite but under a low-key tent next to the stadium. Want to boo him? Shake his hand? Spanos was accessible.

But few fans tried to get access to him. The Chargers struggled to fill the tiny venue with home-team supporters, a fact first obvious against Philadelphia in Week 4 of 2017, when the Eagles recovered a Rivers fumble on the first drive and the crowd roared as if at the old Vet. Still, new head coach Anthony Lynn, a budding star who was hired one day after Spanos announced the move, led the Chargers to a 9-7 record. After wasting much of 2017 with relocation logistics, the Chargers made some modest marketing strides. They partnered with KABC, the top-rated TV station in L.A., announced a deal with iHeartRadio to reach 10 million listeners, and cooperated on a show in the style of HBO's "Hard Knocks" with Spectrum SportsNet. The team sold all 11,000 season tickets in 2018, but the stadium still felt more like a neutral-site college bowl game than the NFL.

In March 2018, the Rams and Chargers launched their SSL programs for the new stadium. It was harder than expected for the Rams and couldn't have gone worse for the Chargers. Most teams hire at least a dozen staffers to handle SSL sales for a new stadium, in addition to hiring a company like Legends. The Chargers, which outsourced most of the work to Legends, were flying blind in L.A., with no analytics department or sophisticated method of reaching fans. The Rams had a huge head start; they had sold 70,000 season tickets for the 2016 season in the Coliseum in six hours. All the Chargers had was "a couple of email addresses" of potential ticket holders, in the words of a team executive, and a slogan -- "Fight for L.A.!" -- that sounded less like a rallying cry and more like a schoolyard challenge to their future landlord, which did not go unnoticed by Rams executives, who mocked the slogan. The Chargers spent $3 million marketing "Fight for L.A.!" -- including $2.3 million on Facebook ads that didn't move the needle.

That fall, Chargers executives reviewed a bracing study that was available only to a handful of teams, league and Legends executives. It confirmed what some around the league had predicted all along: There was practically no market for Chargers season tickets, no matter the price. Legends officials later told league executives and those from other teams that it was the worst feasibility forecast they'd ever seen. In 2018, the Chargers were in the middle of a season in which they would finish 12-4 but rank 30th in revenue, one spot down from their final year in San Diego, owing largely to the small stadium. The team had sold only $60 million worth of SSLs, far behind the league's $400 million goal. "The projections were made before anyone had a clue," one Chargers executive says. "They were completely unrealistic."

Spanos and Chargers COO Jeanne Bonk then made a controversial decision. They slashed prices for 26,000 upper deck seats, lowering tickets to the $50 to $90 range, and dropped the SSL rate to $100 -- up to 15 times less than the Rams were charging for the same seats. The Chargers' reduced prices were higher than options suggested by Legends, which included the idea of abandoning the SSLs altogether. But for a bottom-line league, it was an unmissable flare that L.A. might never be a two-team NFL town.

The Rams got a heads-up one day before the Chargers' fire sale was announced.


Empty seats at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum have served as a reminder that L.A. is still up for grabs for the Rams and Chargers. Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images
THE RAMS WERE furious. Spanos had potentially cost Kroenke hundreds of millions. In the Chargers' news release, president of business operations A.G. Spanos, one of Dean's sons, wrote, "A family of four should be able to buy season tickets for the entire family and not need a second mortgage to do so." It felt like a subtle shot at the Rams.

Other owners and executives were stunned by the Chargers' deep discount and asked the league to intervene. The NFL had considered asking its senior vice president Brian Lafemina, trusted and respected by both the Rams and Chargers, to move to L.A. and serve as peacemaker. But before the league could officially offer the job, Lafemina left to run business operations for the Washington Redskins, and instead a host of league executives were assigned to help manage L.A. Kroenke and Spanos remained cordial with each other -- both are nonconfrontational -- but relationships between their staffs collapsed, becoming petty and personal, with both teams' executives ripping each other to confidants. "The Chargers were trying to save themselves," a high-level source involved in relations between the two teams says. "They want to be seen as a full partner, yet they did something that hit their partner hardest."

"They want to be seen as a full partner, yet they did something that hit their partner hardest."
High-level source involved in relations between the two teams
Spanos insisted the price drop wasn't a spiteful move but a reflection of weak demand, indicative not only of the larger problem of selling the Chargers in L.A. but also of the concept of SSLs in Southern California. There was no tradition of SSLs in L.A. No Lakers fan had to pay extra for the right to buy season tickets to watch LeBron James at Staples Center. It sounded to some fans like a racket, making an already tough sell even tougher. Everyone started pointing fingers, with owners mad at the league office for allowing a toxic relocation process and the league reminding owners that most of them voted for two teams in L.A. In the end, most owners rooted for the Chargers to not piggyback off Kroenke but try to duplicate the success of the soon-to-be Las Vegas Raiders, who have sold nearly $400 million in SSLs, double their projected number, for their new stadium opening in September 2020 off the Vegas Strip. What's more, a "fair amount" of the Raiders SSL buyers live in L.A. and will hop on I-15 on weekends, an executive with knowledge of the sales says. It has left a few owners and team officials worried and irritated that the Raiders have siphoned off part of an already wary L.A. fan base.

Chargers executives were convinced the Rams were lashing out because stadium construction was billions over budget. In the eyes of Chargers brass, the Rams had every right to be angry. But blowing up at Legends was tricky for the Rams because Jones had delivered the L.A. vote -- and Kroenke and Jones have become pals, a power clique of two. Still, Legends had never managed a project so massive -- and it had "gone off the rails," a source close to Legends says. It began in 2016, when the Rams realized that both initial estimates -- $1.86 billion in early 2015, which rose to $2.4 billion by late 2015 -- had been poorly calculated. Vendor costs ballooned because of competition with LAX's $14 billion renovation. The infrastructure was unexpectedly pricey, with a massive retaining wall required 100 feet below grade for the field. A record amount of rain in early 2017 complicated matters even more, filling the hole of the field with up to 15 feet of water that needed to be drained and costing the Rams 40 work days. And so the Rams announced in May of that year that completion would be delayed until 2020. In March 2018, the project had hit a cost of $5 billion, but the price continues to go up. StadCo officials now refer to it to owners and executives around the league as "our $6 billion stadium," although some executives insist it won't be that high. All the construction complexities have turned SoFi Stadium into "the eighth wonder of the world," Khan says. "It's amazing how much earth has been moved."

Kroenke was livid when his legacy project veered so badly off course, with no guarantee that SoFi will be filled once the novelty wears off. The Rams have joked to owners and confidants they'd happily accept extra financial donations from the league, but they haven't submitted a formal proposal and don't plan to. Kroenke is intent on delivering on his promise and not cutting corners. But Kroenke didn't become one of the richest men in America by spending cash without any limits, and unfortunately for him, a lawsuit has no hard cap.

AT A HOTEL bar last spring in Key Biscayne, a few owners and executives discussed a lawsuit that had not only failed to fade away, like most inevitable litigation following a team's relocation, but had mushroomed into a leaguewide headache, shoving the L.A. mess into each owner's email server and threatening everyone's bottom line. A group that included the city of St. Louis, the surrounding county and the Regional Convention and Sports Complex Authority were suing the NFL, claiming in a 52-page state court complaint that Rams officials and league executives violated the league's own relocation bylaws by failing to negotiate with the city in good faith, among other issues. The suit argued that the Rams induced the city to spend more than $17 million on plans for a new stadium that the team never intended to consider because Kroenke had planned long earlier to move to L.A. The complaint alleged breach of contract, unjust enrichment, fraudulent misrepresentation and business interference. The city is seeking billions in damages.

The NFL publicly dismissed the case as baseless and privately saw it as retribution from a city angry at Kroenke, whose departure forever destroyed his relationship with his home state. In his 2016 relocation application, Kroenke had written a scathing indictment of St. Louis both as a football city and as an economic engine, ignoring the loud and loyal crowds during the Greatest Show on Turf. But so far, the St. Louis plaintiffs have quietly won every court motion and decision, including a devastating defeat in the Eastern District of the Missouri State Court of Appeals, in a St. Louis courthouse, on June 12, 2018. The Rams' lawyer, Andrew Kassof, argued for the lawsuit to be sent to arbitration, corporate America's venue of choice. Kassof's argument hinged on what he saw as a clear and simple technicality: The NFL relocation policy was moot because the Rams had the right to relocate whenever they wanted, due to their year-to-year lease in St. Louis' then-Edward Jones Dome. The lease had expired in 2016, Kassof argued, so the Rams were free to leave.

Judge Philip Hess sounded suspicious. "Do the Rams have the ability to move without the NFL's approval?" he said.

"No," Kassof said. "They need the NFL's approval, and ..."

Hess cut him off. "Isn't that what this is about? The relocation policy of the NFL?"

It was a stunning moment in a nearly empty courtroom. Hess' question had forced Kassof to undermine his own case. Christopher Bauman, representing the plaintiffs, seized on it, winning the argument and keeping the case out of arbitration. Last month, the Rams petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court to issue a stay, and the high court denied it. Teams have been forced to provide eight years of phone records and emails for discovery -- and had to hire legal teams and data experts to sift through them. Kroenke has had to foot all the legal bills for the teams and league, part of an indemnification agreement the league presented to the Rams, Chargers and Raiders on the morning of the L.A. vote. The legal bills have reached eight figures for some teams.

St. Louis is now seeking each owner's cut of the Rams' and Chargers' $550 million relocation fees -- about $35.5 million per -- as restitution, infuriating owners. Over the past year, the league has dedicated a full hour at owners meetings to debating the merits of "Hard Knocks" but hasn't formally addressed the St. Louis case in depth, irritating some owners even more. The lawsuit has even reopened old wounds from the relocation process. Discovery turned up a damning email from a Carson project official outlining to St. Louis authorities all the ways the Rams seemed to be in violation of the league's relocation policy, providing a blueprint for the city of St. Louis' lawsuit. The email enraged league and Rams executives and undermined Spanos' reputation as the consummate company man, even though he didn't write it. "The perception was that Dean always put the league first and Stan was only out for himself," a team executive says. "Neither was ever completely true."

It has all served as a reminder that before the shotgun marriage there was an ugly divorce, ensuring nobody gets out unscathed.


Chargers owner Dean Spanos' team has struggled to draw fans in Carson, but he says he's proud to be part of the effort to fight for the NFL in Los Angeles. Tom Hauck via AP Photo
THE FIGHT FOR L.A. has carried a cost. The needs of the Chargers and Rams are as different as the personalities of their owners. The Chargers still have to find a way to matter in L.A. Late in the summer of 2018, the team hired Fred Maas, a longtime Spanos adviser, as chief of staff. His mandate was clear: increase team revenues. His first order of business was to kill the useless "Fight For L.A.!" slogan, preferring instead small steps to seek out L.A. Chargers fans. The team has sharpened its social media feeds, held a dog rescue day, and hired a Hispanic outreach coordinator who, unlike a predecessor, actually speaks Spanish. On the first day of the 2019 draft, the Chargers held a ticketed fan rally at the Santa Monica Pier, drawing a beyond-capacity 6,000 fans. Still, even executives playing the long game knew getting traction was a big challenge. "We were the most successful 7-11 in San Diego," a high-ranking Chargers executive says. "Now we're just another Whole Foods in L.A."

The Rams, meanwhile, need the stadium to reshape Inglewood and southwest L.A., while luring fans to show up, not just watch on TV. The Rams' 2018 TV ratings in L.A. were higher than the Giants and Jets in New York, the only comparable market and situation. And a prime-time game against the Seattle Seahawks this year outdrew a Dodgers playoff game head-to-head on TV. The Rams ranked 11th in total home paid attendance in 2018, despite playing in the league's oldest stadium. But at any given game, roughly 40,000 fans are theirs, 30,000 root for the visiting team -- as was the case when the Chargers played the Rams at the Coliseum in 2018 -- and the rest seem to be wearing Tony Romo or Bo Jackson jerseys. It's a leaguewide problem in the age of the secondary ticket market but an acute problem in L.A. The Rams' goal is to be the top choice in the region, knowing full well that an entire generation of fans might have been lost in the past two decades. If that fails, their goal is to be every L.A. NFL fan's second-favorite team, and to be the top choice for the next generation. The Rams are leveraging everything, paying all of their star players, trading away future picks -- they sent two first-round picks to Jacksonville for cornerback Jalen Ramsey in October -- to not only win now but also ensure SoFi Stadium is full, preferably in blue and gold.

"We are fighting over relatively penny-ante things. It's unfathomable."
Executive involved in Chargers-Rams spats
In the end, it'll fall to Legends -- and, by extension, Jones -- to nudge L.A. into embracing the Chargers and the Rams. Jones declined several requests to comment for this story; a Cowboys spokesman said "a lot is still happening and Jerry would prefer not to discuss it." A lot of what is happening involves the teams' staffs at war, mostly in a passive-aggressive manner via emails and texts. There have been spats over the types of golf carts the stadium will use and over the number of office spaces Chargers suite sales staff are entitled to, per the term sheet. "We are fighting over relatively penny ante things," one executive involved says. "It's unfathomable."

The disagreements inevitably return to the most divisive and, not coincidentally, most expensive issue: the Chargers' SSL prices. In October 2018, when the Chargers announced the price drop, the Rams felt burned, but Kroenke's StadCo -- to which Legends reports -- still pledged to the NFL that it would hire 20 new Chargers SSL sales staffers, along with administrators, bringing each team's SSL sales staff to 40. The Chargers believed staffing parity would give them a chance to succeed or, at least, have a fighting chance. But over the next four months, nobody was hired on the Chargers' side. In December and January, Legends presented a proposal with a Chargers sales staff number lower than 40, explaining that the Chargers didn't warrant as many staffers because there was so little SSL demand -- a low blow, in the minds of Chargers executives. So the Chargers invoked the nuclear option by appealing in writing to the league, forcing Goodell into the role of mediator. There was a conference call with Goodell, Kroenke and Spanos in mid-April, followed by a meeting of team executives in New York on June 20. The staffing issue, among others, was finally resolved -- the Chargers now have 35 SSL salespeople -- but it's still a sore spot with both teams, the Chargers feeling marginalized and the Rams resentful of carrying the financial burden of two teams, one billionaire indefinitely subsidizing another.

Jones has told associates he feels a deep responsibility to make sure Kroenke and Spanos are not only successful but feel taken care of. But the Chargers have sold a weak 25,000 season tickets to date, and the Rams have sold a nascent 40,000, with the hope from both clubs that sales will improve after the stadium opens. "People are not going to spend a fortune on something they haven't seen yet," a Chargers executive says. Sources from both teams insist there isn't any friction with Jones, which is either true or simply what they're saying to avoid getting on his bad side, hoping not to test strained relations. By all appearances, Kroenke and Jones are just fine, hanging out at the hotel bar at various owners meetings, sipping wine and Johnnie Walker Blue Label scotch. In August in Chicago, Jones and Spanos had dinner together after a session of bargaining with the players' union. In negotiations with the union, Jones has raised the so-called LA Exemption, a proposal calling for owners and players to consider diverting tens of millions outside of the normal stadium credits to help Kroenke defray the cost of the stadium. NFL team owners move in self-selected packs and cliques, and Jones will always gravitate toward an owner who can keep revenues spiraling in the right direction.

Nobody in the NFL is spending more to make more than Stan Kroenke.

DEAN SPANOS HOLDS a microphone at the center of a crowded, well-appointed room. It's a late September evening, at a Chargers reception at Luxe, a membership-only office building and high-end restaurant in Beverly Hills. Clad in his usual attire -- blazer over polo shirt -- Spanos appears relaxed before suite holders, business partners, elected officials, team employees and media, despite facing another tough season. The Chargers have played hard but haven't won as much as in the past, the fatigue from playing without any home field advantage for virtually four years perhaps starting to take a toll. The rare high moments have been tough to enjoy. After a dominant home win over the Packers on Nov. 3, the Los Angeles Times published a long column imploring the Chargers to leave for a market that appreciates them.

By midseason, Spanos would seem exasperated over periodic rumors and reports that the team will be sold or relocate again, responding to a report from The Athletic that the Chargers had discussed moving to London as "total f---ing bulls---." At the reception, a flat-screen TV behind him flashes a Chargers logo. "Everything we do, we do as a family," Spanos says.

His family still loves San Diego. Spanos loves San Diego. His father, Alex, a legendary businessman who died at 95 in October 2018, loved San Diego. It still isn't easy to say Los Angeles Chargers -- Fox broadcaster Troy Aikman slipped up on a recent Thursday Night Football telecast -- and NFL executives believe the Chargers could have raised $250 million a year in SSL revenue if they'd stayed, a figure that team executives dismiss as preposterous. If Kroenke had lost the L.A. vote to the Chargers and Raiders, he might have petitioned to move the Rams to San Diego, a source close to him says. But Spanos has told associates that he cut a better financial deal with Kroenke than most had initially given him credit for -- and he insists privately that he really doesn't mind being a tenant. The Los Angeles Chargers are here to stay, whether the city's fans want them or not.

"The stadium is going to redefine Los Angeles in that area for the next century. It's going to be incredible and we're very proud to be part of it."
Dean Spanos
Spanos gives a stump speech of sorts about SoFi Stadium, offering to set up tours. The Chargers are trying to remain optimistic. Team executives are hopeful they can hit $320 million in SSL sales for Kroenke and climb from 31st in revenue to the middle of the pack in the next few years. But others wonder if there's any real opportunity for the Chargers. In the annual Forbes list of NFL franchise valuations -- an imperfect ranking that nonetheless tickles owners' egos -- the Rams were fourth, at $3.8 billion, for the second consecutive year. The Las Vegas-bound Raiders jumped six spots to 12th. The Chargers ticked up only one spot, from 22nd in 2018 to 21st in 2019, and their valuation has increased only $420 million, to $2.5 billion, from 2016 in San Diego to now. The team hasn't added the envisioned $1 billion in value -- at least not yet. The Chargers' lack of popularity and inability to monetize however many SSLs they sell will always give them a low ceiling in a high-ceiling league.

"The stadium is going to redefine Los Angeles in that area for the next century," Spanos tells the crowd. "It's going to be incredible and we're very proud to be a part of it."


SoFi Stadium, set to open next year at a cost of $5 billion-plus, will be home to the uneasy arranged marriage between the Rams and Chargers. DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images
Kroenke is very proud to deliver it, associates say, giving the league something to celebrate in 2020: a glistening venue that might start to heal the relationship between a city and league, not to mention the rift between the two teams. The strained relations with the Rams seem to be on Spanos' mind as he speaks at Luxe. He thanks his future landlord, calling the Rams "great partners." No matter their differences, Jones, Kroenke and Spanos are in this fight for L.A. together, bound by the mandate that a stadium with the wow factor will, in fact, wow enough people to fill it.

"If I could have one wish this year, I'd wish that we could play them in the Super Bowl," Spanos says of the Rams. "But if I can't play them, we'll play anybody."

JERRY JONES STANDS at the 50-yard line of AT&T Stadium, not far from the sideline, pacing in tight semicircles, ringing his hands and looking anxious. It's an hour before the Cowboys play the Eagles on Sunday Night Football in late October, and the stadium is buzzing and frenzied, its own football energy field -- exactly what he has promised to deliver to L.A. As always, Jones is at the center and absorbing it all, wearing his typical game-day attire of a navy suit and powder-blue shirt with a Cowboys star pinned to his left jacket lapel.

"I'm nervous but feel good," he says with a grin. "This one we really need."


A few days earlier, Jones had stood with Kroenke outside a ballroom at the league meetings in Florida. Other owners drifted in and out of the conversation, but it was mostly just the two of them, a pair of power brokers who will take the league on a journey next fall. The Cowboys will be one of the Rams' 2020 home opponents, and it's easy to imagine a prime-time season and stadium opener between them. There are venues more iconic and louder than AT&T, but until SoFi opens, it's the standard for the power and potential of a new big-ticket stadium, a destination not just for football but for the profit-churning celebration of football grandeur. Nobody in the modern NFL has understood showmanship better than Jones, and he has never failed when he has gone big on vision. Next year will clarify whether there's such a thing as too big.

Jones lingers on the field a few more minutes. He moves to his private suite, flanked by his two sons and surrounded by 91,213 screaming fans as the Cowboys rout the Eagles, an iconic American evening in an iconic American city that might or might not transfer to another next September, when two L.A. teams kick off from underground and into the domed air.

  

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Kungset
Member since Mar 29th 2004
6406 posts
Fri Nov-22-19 02:40 PM

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120. "damn lol"
In response to Reply # 119


  

          

> That fall, Chargers executives reviewed a bracing study that was
> available only to a handful of teams, league and Legends executives.
> It confirmed what some around the league had predicted all along:
> There was practically no market for Chargers season tickets, no
> matter the price. Legends officials later told league executives and
> those from other teams that it was the worst feasibility forecast
> they'd ever seen.

  

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smutsboy
Member since Jun 29th 2002
33297 posts
Fri Nov-22-19 06:00 PM

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121. "lol"
In response to Reply # 120


  

          

If owners were practical instead of billionaire sociopaths*, they'd just move the damn team back to SD and pretend this never happened.
.
.
.
.
.

*billionaire sociopaths is redundant

  

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mrhood75
Member since Dec 06th 2004
43676 posts
Fri Nov-22-19 06:56 PM

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122. "LOL @ the NFL being morons and not moving the Raiders down to LA"
In response to Reply # 119


  

          

The one team with a decent LA-fanbase, and no one wanted to do it because it might attract "undesirables." (Them sweating that the team's gear got adopted by LA gangs.)

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Checkin' Our Style, Return To Zero:

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