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Subject: "Selma (Ava DuVernay, 2014) " Previous topic | Next topic
xbenzive
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Thu Nov-06-14 11:57 PM

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"Selma (Ava DuVernay, 2014) "
Thu Nov-06-14 11:58 PM by xbenzive

          

I have yet to watch her films, although Middle of Nowhere will have a proper release on DVD/BD/VOD this January (I remember Frank loved it from his podcast). Trailer looks good. Using Public Enemy was expected. Can't wait.

https://movies.yahoo.com/video/selma-trailer-233000059.html

  

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Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
NIIIIGGGGGAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!! I've been waiting for this one.
Nov 07th 2014
1
Going to be amazing
Nov 07th 2014
2
Powerful.
Nov 07th 2014
3
THIS shit looks good
Nov 08th 2014
4
Ava DuVernay. So goddamn good. Go see Middle of Nowhere.
Nov 09th 2014
5
AND I Will Follow
Nov 10th 2014
6
      Yep yep.
Nov 10th 2014
7
It's, unsurprisingly, outstanding.
Nov 12th 2014
8
My full review of the film here:
Nov 12th 2014
9
every time I see tweets about screenings, ppl always tweet that there we...
Nov 18th 2014
10
Of what I've seen so far, no.
Nov 18th 2014
12
Okay. I doubt tho that they give Best Picture to a "Black" film....
Nov 18th 2014
14
Plenty of Oscar pundits have them left out of nominations altogether.
Nov 18th 2014
13
      I wouldn't be surprised if Steve Carrell wins it this year.
Nov 18th 2014
15
           If I had to bet *today* on the Best Actor nominees...
Nov 18th 2014
16
how can a brotha get in to an advanced screening in NY?
Nov 18th 2014
11
It would've been interesting if this came out this week w/ Ferguson issu...
Nov 25th 2014
17
Trust me when I say...
Nov 25th 2014
18
      Hope so. Jan 9th seems so close yet so far away
Nov 25th 2014
19
Powerful. The following folks will be going to the Oscars.
Nov 26th 2014
20
Agreed with all of this.
Nov 26th 2014
21
man Carmen Ejogo sneaking in for Best Supporting Actress
Nov 27th 2014
24
RE: man Carmen Ejogo sneaking in for Best Supporting Actress
Dec 01st 2014
27
RE: Powerful. The following folks will be going to the Oscars.
May 07th 2015
111
Independent Spirit Awards Noms!
Nov 26th 2014
22
Toronto residents interested in this film
Nov 26th 2014
23
Ava DuVernay at the NY screening
Nov 27th 2014
25
oh thats fantastic
Dec 01st 2014
28
If you can't fuck with this movie, I can't fuck with you. Period.
Nov 30th 2014
26
Making History With ‘Selma,’ Ava DuVernay Seeks a Different Equality
Dec 05th 2014
29
I think about this movie nearly every day. Multiple times a day.
Dec 05th 2014
30
Golden Globe Noms!
Dec 11th 2014
31
Impressive and Important
Dec 11th 2014
32
NYC: Regal Union Square Stadium 14, Opening Dec. 24th
Dec 15th 2014
33
The King family doesn't like anyone making a MLK movie
Dec 16th 2014
34
Well, "the screenwriter," Ava DuVernay, won't get credit for
Dec 17th 2014
35
I was wondering why she wasn't credited.
Dec 17th 2014
36
I didn't realize she did a rewrite
Dec 17th 2014
38
MLK III said.....
Dec 17th 2014
37
      GOOD. This whole "controversy" was starting to smell like some
Dec 18th 2014
39
NYC: also showing at BAM Cinemas opening Dec. 25th
Dec 19th 2014
40
wow. what a movie.
Dec 25th 2014
41
nice move w/the 'select' cities - but why no Chicago?
Dec 25th 2014
42
$$$$
Dec 26th 2014
43
Why not Birmingham &/or Montgomery for the Christmas debut?
Dec 26th 2014
44
masterful
Dec 27th 2014
45
Smear Campaign against "Selma" in effect?
Dec 31st 2014
46
EW Fact Checks Selma
Jan 03rd 2015
51
And another "historian" questions the movie
Jan 03rd 2015
53
There are few things more irritating...
Jan 03rd 2015
56
RE: And another "historian" questions the movie
Jan 06th 2015
75
so it's like The Butler?
Jan 04th 2015
61
Bradford Young getting some love (deadline swipe)
Jan 01st 2015
47
Safe for certain audiences and ignores very important figures
Jan 03rd 2015
48
I vehemently disagree with everything here.
Jan 03rd 2015
49
^^^
Jan 03rd 2015
50
Where was Kwame Ture?
Jan 03rd 2015
52
See my previous reply. All points are the same.
Jan 03rd 2015
55
      Your points are off because these people
Jan 03rd 2015
57
           Okay. You wanted a totally different movie.
Jan 04th 2015
62
                I do was the movie about Selma or Dr. MLK Jr
Jan 04th 2015
64
                     RE: I do was the movie about Selma or Dr. MLK Jr
Jan 04th 2015
65
                     Countless people have talked about why it's so good.
Jan 04th 2015
67
                     How did they put a pretty bow on it?
Jan 06th 2015
73
                          they mentioned MLKs infidelity
Jan 08th 2015
77
                               His wife was not a grassroots organizer
Jan 08th 2015
78
                                    Nor was she in the movie.
Jan 08th 2015
79
                                    You missed the point again
Jan 08th 2015
80
                                         RE: You missed the point again
Jan 08th 2015
81
                                         Wrong these are not details these are vital facts.
Jan 09th 2015
83
                                              RE: Wrong these are not details these are vital facts.
Jan 09th 2015
84
                                              Your last line is what everyone has been saying.
Jan 09th 2015
87
                                         Yet you prove my point with your post.
Jan 09th 2015
82
                                    .
Jan 10th 2015
88
How does Viola Luzzio get a shout out before Ture? (yt savior)
Jan 03rd 2015
58
How does Viola Luzzio get a shout out before Ture? (yt savior)
Jan 03rd 2015
59
How do you vehemently disagree with everything he wrote????
Jan 18th 2015
101
      It's a movie.
Jan 18th 2015
102
It's funny you talk about a white savior
Jan 04th 2015
60
      So you didn't see the angle of northern whites joining and giving
Jan 04th 2015
63
           Naw, it was part of the press angle MLK was doing
Jan 04th 2015
68
                See this is where you need to do your research
Jan 04th 2015
70
                     The movie never portrayed he was against it but that it would have to wa...
Jan 04th 2015
71
Absolutely excellent
Jan 03rd 2015
54
Why It Took 50 Years To Make A Major MLK Movie (SWIPE)
Jan 04th 2015
66
i liked it.
Jan 04th 2015
69
get em Frank
Jan 05th 2015
72
ain't no one in here but one fool sis
Jan 09th 2015
85
      *salutes*
Jan 10th 2015
89
      I see a bunch of fools making excuses for throwing
Jan 12th 2015
94
"I wasn't interested in making a white-savior movie..." (swipe)
Jan 06th 2015
74
Ava was on Charlie Rose last night
Jan 08th 2015
76
really cool that David pushed for Ava to direct
Jan 09th 2015
86
      brought her to that next level
Jan 13th 2015
97
Avo on The Daily Show
Jan 10th 2015
90
Ava on The Reid Report
Jan 10th 2015
91
RE: so no Ella Baker or Stokely Carmichael in this?
Jan 11th 2015
92
How convenient
Jan 12th 2015
95
cookie cutter
Jan 11th 2015
93
This movie is 10 or 11 times better than Boyhood
Jan 12th 2015
96
Amen. Sad that Boyhood gonna take all the awards smh.
Jan 22nd 2015
103
"OKP hates black movies." (c) Idiots
Jan 14th 2015
98
Love him or Hate him, Spike Lee *STAYS* telling the truth:
Jan 16th 2015
99
RE: Love him or Hate him, Spike Lee *STAYS* telling the truth:
Jan 17th 2015
100
Bradford Young!!! That shot of the Pettus bridge that tilts to the marc...
Jan 30th 2015
104
great movie.
Jan 30th 2015
105
A great movie.
Feb 03rd 2015
106
a reminder what it is to be a decent human being.
Feb 10th 2015
107
It was a great movie. i think it was 2014's best honestly
Mar 05th 2015
108
Very strong movie
Mar 06th 2015
109
Finally saw it via YouTube Rental
May 07th 2015
110
Rented this via Netflix the other day
Jun 27th 2015
112

bwood
Member since Apr 03rd 2006
8020 posts
Fri Nov-07-14 11:12 AM

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1. "NIIIIGGGGGAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!! I've been waiting for this one."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

And the trailer does not disappoint.

------------------------------------------
America from 9:00 on: https://youtu.be/GUwLCQU10KQ

  

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Euameio
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Fri Nov-07-14 11:54 AM

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2. "Going to be amazing"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

whatever version of the script I read was decent too!

  

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SoulHonky
Member since Jan 21st 2003
25919 posts
Fri Nov-07-14 03:29 PM

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3. "Powerful."
In response to Reply # 0


          

Great trailer. Can't wait for this one.

  

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KingMonte
Member since Feb 13th 2006
4659 posts
Sat Nov-08-14 10:48 AM

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4. "THIS shit looks good"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

No Butler/Help vibe so far.

I have a 400 year old chip on my shoulder.

...and a podcast
white nationalists vs EVERYBODY
https://wnve.podbean.com

  

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
83325 posts
Sun Nov-09-14 01:48 AM

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5. "Ava DuVernay. So goddamn good. Go see Middle of Nowhere."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

As soon as you can.

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For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

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lfresh
Member since Jun 18th 2002
92693 posts
Mon Nov-10-14 02:05 PM

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6. "AND I Will Follow"
In response to Reply # 5


  

          


~~~~
When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices. Live so that when you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.
~~~~
You cannot hate people for their own good.

  

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
83325 posts
Mon Nov-10-14 02:32 PM

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7. "Yep yep."
In response to Reply # 6


  

          

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
83325 posts
Wed Nov-12-14 12:39 AM

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8. "It's, unsurprisingly, outstanding."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Dodges most of the Biopic Traps. Generates incredible emotion. Looks and sounds great. Oyelowo is a beast. DuVernay is a beast. Bradford Young is a beast. I cried.

More to come. But yeah, this is a major work.

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For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
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Wed Nov-12-14 12:26 PM

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9. "My full review of the film here:"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://buff.ly/1pRhOO5

AFI FEST REVIEW: “SELMA”
Russell Hainline November 12, 2014 AFI

Ava DuVernay’s Selma is a joyful, angry, and sad film– occasionally all three in the same scene. It’s smart, soulful, and deeply affecting, boasting some truly powerhouse moments and containing nary a misstep. At the heart of the film’s deep and absurdly talented cast of characters is an unmistakably human depiction of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., played by a pitch-perfect David Oyelowo. There are a myriad of ways in which a film about Dr. King could have become cheap, manipulative, and unworthy of his memory, and yet DuVernay dodges every potential pitfall. Selma is one of the best films of the year, one of the best biopics of the last decade, and one of the best films ever made on the civil rights movement.

It’s 1965. Black people have the right to vote, but down South, the white people in charge of voter registration have made it nearly impossible for them to exercise this right. Lyndon Johnson (Tom Wilkinson) believes that the issue is far from a priority, but Martin Luther King Jr. Sees the forest for the trees. If black people can’t vote, they can’t elect lawmakers and judges, they can’t sit on juries, and they can’t receive justice when racists inevitably brutalize and kill black people in the recently desegregated South.

King asks President Johnson for help. When Johnson refuses, King decides to push the issue to the forefront of the national conversation. His plan: use his style of non-violent civil disobedience to aggravate the whites in Selma, Alabama, stir up trouble, and subsequently stir up the attention of the media. If a Nobel Prize winner can’t get the attention of the president in person, maybe he can when people are being beaten on the cover of every newspaper around the country.

DuVernay’s refusal to deify the activist heroes is her film’s greatest asset. It’s easy to imagine Dr. King as some godlike image of perfection – never tired, never worried, never mistaken – but this depiction would be an insult to his accomplishments. King isn’t an inspiration because he’s a model of human perfection; he’s an inspiration because he had the same fears and insecurities that we all do, yet he managed to overcome them and persevere. In Selma, Oyelowo’s face does the talking. He knows that he’s far more likely to be killed than he is to succeed, and that knowledge makes him constantly tired. King is depicted here as a soldier, behind enemy lines for years and fatigued from the battle.

Indeed, the movie begins with King imagining a peaceful life with Coretta when his fighting days are over. At first, we think it’s dramatic irony, as we know how this story concludes. As the film progresses, however, we realize we’re not the only ones in on the ending. King knows he’s going to die. He just doesn’t quite know when.

While the film doesn’t deify its heroes, cinematographer Bradford Young certainly manages to make them all look extraordinary. From his work on Dee Rees’ Pariah, Andrew Dosunmu’s Mother of George, DuVernay’s Middle of Nowhere, and now this, only one inescapable conclusion can be reached: no D.P. in the history of cinema has shot black people more beautifully than Bradford Young. As DuVernay put it in the Q&A following the film’s AFI Film Festival premiere, “he loves black skin.” Too many cinematographers in Hollywood wash out their black actors with too much light or muddy the richness of their skin color with not enough light. Not Young.

If you’re skeptical, look at how Oyelowo is lit in some of his Hollywood fare versus how Young lights him in Middle of Nowhere and Selma. Most cinematographers of studio fare wouldn’t even dare try a shot in which dark-skinned actors sit in the shadows of a dark room—they wouldn’t know where to begin. Selma has some of its best scenes at night: whether a crowded jail cell, a car ride, or a late-night phone call to Mahalia Jackson, every image is lush. If you haven’t put Bradford Young on your Mount Rushmore of the best cinematographers working today, you still have time to remedy your mistake.

Oyelowo knows how to play scenes and Young knows how to shoot scenes… but it’s DuVernay who knows how to find their magic. I could make a laundry list of my favorite moments in this film that would extend to the floor like a scroll. The terrible dread seeing four little girls talking about hair in a church. The rousing monologue delivered by the always-magnificent Lorraine Toussaint. A jaw-dropping moment of silence between Martin and Coretta. The history of Cager Lee, performed by Henry G. Sanders, achingly sad and inspiring. I’ve come to expect magic moments in Ava DuVernay’s films, and she has yet to disappoint me. This is her first feature made for over a million dollars. It is beyond exciting to think of the possibilities of what she can accomplish with a decent budget in the future.

Most importantly, Selma manages to wordlessly tie the events of the past to the realities of the present. A young black man is needlessly shot by a white police officer. A city is divided between its population (the majority of which is black), and its government officials and lawmen (the majority of whom are white). Non-violent protests by the black community lead to police brutality. How embarrassing is it that you don’t know if I’m describing events from 1965 or 2014?

Selma isn’t just a beautifully executed biopic; it’s a call to action. After murders during his protests, King calls out everyone who sits by idly as injustice is perpetrated, giving their hands an equal share of the blood. DuVernay doesn’t lean on the contemporary social relevance of the material; she’s smart enough to know that she doesn’t need to. The story isn’t about one man who fought hard to bring about change. It’s about the mass effort necessary to make such change happen, and the responsibility for injustice shared among the inactive. As long as, to quote Mos Def, “the length of black life is treated with short worth,” Selma will remain an endlessly urgent and relevant work of art.

Grade: A

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
3206 posts
Tue Nov-18-14 12:12 AM

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10. "every time I see tweets about screenings, ppl always tweet that there we..."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

standing ovations after. And legit tears during scenes. Wow.

Does Ava, David and Bradford have any serious competition where they won't win Oscars and Golden Globes?

  

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ZooTown74
Member since May 29th 2002
43582 posts
Tue Nov-18-14 02:07 AM

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12. "Of what I've seen so far, no."
In response to Reply # 10
Tue Nov-18-14 03:10 AM by ZooTown74

  

          

>Does Ava, David and Bradford have any serious competition where they won't win Oscars and Golden Globes?

The closest thing to competition might be The Theory of Everything, which checks off all of the things on the Oscar checklist: biopic/period piece, actorly performance by an actor doing actorly things, like playing a man with a form of ALS, a witty script, an emotional love story.

And Foxcatcher might sneak in despite its super-dark subject matter and execution, though some may argue that it's a movie whose performances from the 3 male leads make up for the lack of (a complete) story.

But so far, that's about it. But I have yet to see a few of the apparent heavy hitters, like Unbroken, The Imitation Game, American Sniper, Mr. Turner, The Homesman, and Wild.

But this might be the kind of year that a popular movie like Gone Girl and Fury could merit some consideration. And of course, let's not forget about stuff that came out earlier in the year, like The Grand Budapest Hotel and Boyhood.

I personally wasn't that enthralled with Nightcrawler (it's a great character in search of a movie with a less-obvious message than "Hey, guys, the media is bad and if guys like this can succeed, THEN HOW FUCKED UP ARE WE??????," but it may merit some consideration for Gyllenhaal and the script.

________________________________________________________________________________
Niggas made aliases.

  

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
3206 posts
Tue Nov-18-14 01:20 PM

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14. "Okay. I doubt tho that they give Best Picture to a "Black" film...."
In response to Reply # 12


  

          

back-to-back Oscar years. Unless Oprah buzzes the movie to great heights.

>But this might be the kind of year that a popular movie like
>Gone Girl and Fury could merit some consideration. And of
>course, let's not forget about stuff that came out earlier in
>the year, like The Grand Budapest Hotel and Boyhood.

But doesn't movies released early in the year rarely win? Like it's out of voters memories.

  

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
83325 posts
Tue Nov-18-14 10:34 AM

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13. "Plenty of Oscar pundits have them left out of nominations altogether."
In response to Reply # 10


  

          

http://www.goldderby.com/awardshows/experts/oscars-2014-nominations-nominations/best-picture.html

Boyhood, Unbroken, The Theory of Everything, The Imitation Game, and Birdman all seem pretty close to locks. Those seem to be the five favorites. After that, Gone Girl, Selma, Wild, and Whiplash seem like the next candidates-- but again, those are just for nominations, and with movies like Into the Woods, Mr. Turner, American Sniper, and A Most Violent Year all still looming in terms of potential buzz, things can change.

I think Selma will be a classic nomination-no-win film.
Oyelowo isn't a big enough name to win Best Actor this year, even if I like his performance best out of what I've seen-- I'd like to think he gets nominated, but it's a stacked stacked year.
Bradford has an uphill battle to even snag a nomination-- the movie's buzz would have to soar to "everything gets nominated" heights. And it's not there yet.

I'm not talking about quality, mind you. Just awards chances.

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For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
3206 posts
Tue Nov-18-14 01:23 PM

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15. "I wouldn't be surprised if Steve Carrell wins it this year."
In response to Reply # 13


  

          

Like they were enthralled with Robin Williams going serious to give him the win.

>I think Selma will be a classic nomination-no-win film.
>Oyelowo isn't a big enough name to win Best Actor this year,
>even if I like his performance best out of what I've seen--
>I'd like to think he gets nominated, but it's a stacked
>stacked year.
>Bradford has an uphill battle to even snag a nomination-- the
>movie's buzz would have to soar to "everything gets nominated"
>heights. And it's not there yet.
>
>I'm not talking about quality, mind you. Just awards chances.

I hear you.

  

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
83325 posts
Tue Nov-18-14 01:35 PM

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16. "If I had to bet *today* on the Best Actor nominees..."
In response to Reply # 15


  

          

I'd go:

Michael Keaton
Eddie Redmayne
Benedict Cumberbatch
Steve Carell
David Oyelowo

In that order. Keaton and Redmayne are locks, Cumberbatch is close to a lock. Carell has more buzz than Oyelowo because he's a bigger name and his cast has more star power in general. Oyelowo just needs to stay in front of people like Bradley Cooper and Jake Gyllenhaal. I think Jake's movie is too dark to sneak in. I'd imagine Cooper's film will play well, just an issue of if the Academy thinks it's an "Oscar film."

Still, Oyelowo's issues is, as it has been, name recognition. In order to win Oscars, people have to see your film. And the Academy almost always prefers films with star power. Critics can help steer a movie into the Academy's line of vision, which is Selma's best shot.

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
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Tue Nov-18-14 12:13 AM

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11. "how can a brotha get in to an advanced screening in NY?"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

  

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
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Tue Nov-25-14 11:45 AM

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17. "It would've been interesting if this came out this week w/ Ferguson issu..."
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Like when Fruitvale Station came out during Zimmerman trial/verdict

  

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
83325 posts
Tue Nov-25-14 12:36 PM

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18. "Trust me when I say..."
In response to Reply # 17


  

          

... the Relevance-o-Meter is about to ping off the charts when this flick hits. It will be impossible to NOT write about Ferguson in the reviews.

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
3206 posts
Tue Nov-25-14 12:40 PM

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19. "Hope so. Jan 9th seems so close yet so far away"
In response to Reply # 18


  

          

I hope it does well in the limited theaters on Dec. 25th.

  

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ZooTown74
Member since May 29th 2002
43582 posts
Wed Nov-26-14 04:38 AM

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20. "Powerful. The following folks will be going to the Oscars."
In response to Reply # 0
Mon Dec-01-14 01:42 AM by ZooTown74

  

          

David Oyelowo
Ava DuVernay
(maybe) Tom Wilkinson
Bradford Young
(maybe/should) Carmen Ejogo
(maybe) Tim Roth
Oprah (as a producer)
Brad Pitt (as a producer)
Paul Webb (screenwriter)


Fantastic film. And, given the current climate, very timely.

So what is this movie, exactly? Is it yet another film depicting black struggle and suffering? Not exactly. Is it yet another biopic detailing the noble, Christ-like struggle of Dr. Martin Luther the King, in a plot-driven recounting of a historical event? No. Not even close.

Ava DuVernay says she was brought onto the project by David Oyelowo. So he asked Ava to come in, and she said she wasn't going to do it at first, as this was not her thing, her thing is stories about black women and love. But she found a way in, and though the script is credited to one person, I got the sense that she put more than a little bit of her thing into it (and that she also probably went to arbitration for a writing credit and didn't get it). Ava also said she wanted to stay away from the obvious Civil Rights period markers like the 60's Motown soundtrack, and the singing of the Negro spirituals during the protests, and come up with something fresh and new. And that, this is.

It's a soulful study, not just of Dr. King, but of the people around him: Andrew Young (Andre Holland from The Knick), John Lewis (newcomer Stephan James), Hosea Williams (Wendell Pierce), James Bevel (Common - save the kee-kees, niggas, he was fine), Diane Nash (an underutilized Tessa Thompson), and on and on. Like Gina Prince-Bythewood, Ava thrives in showing the intimate moments: yes, the marches are here, and yes, the speeches are here, but there are also times when we see these brave folks laughing and talking and planning and LIVING life, with all of its complications and such. That way, when they encounter racist resistance, the pain and the victories are felt a lot more.

David Oyelowo is an immediate front runner for Best Actor, period, no question. Dude did more than just recite speeches, he made you feel the weight of his being a reluctant hero, of sorts: as David pointed out, Dr. King wasn't really supposed to lead all of this, he just sorta fell into it. And this movie is the exact (but not literal) document of the moment when, after wrestling with the magnitude of the moment, Dr. King decided to take it on, while also trying to get his way with the federal government, a government that kept tabs on him and the movement he led. With David's performance, you FEEL that weight, you FEEL when he's struggling with imperfection and self-doubt, you watch and root for him as he shrewdly negotiates with President Lyndon B. Johnson (a superb Tom Wilkinson) to get what he wants. You feel the complexity in the character, the complexity of all of the characters, and I hope Oscar voters will appreciate and honor the work David and Ava specifically put in to put a new spin on not just Dr. King but the Historical Black Biopic.

But be clear: it's not Eyes on the Prize meets Do the Right Thing. Dr. King's philosophy of non-violent protest is honored here. But there is something more going on here, and the result to me is the strongest, most emotionally engaging historical black drama since Malcolm X.

________________________________________________________________________________
Niggas made aliases.

  

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
83325 posts
Wed Nov-26-14 10:15 AM

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21. "Agreed with all of this."
In response to Reply # 20


  

          

I'm kind of coming around on Oscar hopes too... at least for the picture itself. I still think people have decided that it's Keaton vs. Redmayne and Oyelowo is getting the "happy to be there" nomination that we'll talk about for years when discussing who actually should have won. But Imitation Game looks vulnerable (haven't seen it yet, but the total lack of Spirit Award noms probably says something), and I don't see voters passing on a historical drama of this quality for something as jokey as Birdman. So it'd come down to Boyhood, Unbroken, and Selma. And given the timeliness of the subject matter here...

Really, I'm just hoping this momentum means a surefire nom for Young. He's blown me away for a few years now, and he deserves a nom, but it's a stacked field, with Birdman, Interstellar, Gone Girl, and Mr. Turner considered by many as virtual locks. Unbroken will likely compete for that spot, and that's God Deakins-- if they're feeling the movie, I doubt they'd pass on nominating him again too. Maybe if Mr. Turner totally falls through the cracks...?

Not that Oscars even remotely matter. The movie is what it is regardless of acknowledgement: a fucking great movie.

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
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SankofaII
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Thu Nov-27-14 08:43 AM

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24. "man Carmen Ejogo sneaking in for Best Supporting Actress"
In response to Reply # 20
Thu Nov-27-14 08:44 AM by SankofaII

  

          

would be fucking EPIC!

I mean, SHIT, she was among the first wave of British actresses showing up in American films and TV (Kate Winslet, Thandie Newton, Rachel Weisz, Marsha Thomson, etc.)...and never got her just due.

We all KNEW she had the goods but just popped up randomly here and there in flicks...

I mean, when she played Ms. King THE FIRST TIME opposite her husband Jeffrey Wright in the HBO biopic on MLK, she was amazing and outshone Wright a few times throughout the film...

but she's back? and in SELMA playing a role she's really put her stamp on AND will play again for the third time in the Ethan Hawke Chet Baker biopic coming out next year?

SHIIIIIIIIIIITTTT I love me some Patricia Arquette and Arquette is apparently the front runner for Best Supporting Actress. but Carmen?

CARMEN EJOGO = MAXIMUM SLAYAGE

I hope she gets an oscar nod...

Get Out the Room
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/get-out-the-room/id525657893

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J-Elijah
Member since Dec 09th 2009
260 posts
Mon Dec-01-14 02:18 AM

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27. "RE: man Carmen Ejogo sneaking in for Best Supporting Actress"
In response to Reply # 24


          

Me too. I met Carmen in Brooklyn. She was so cool. 2014 is her year. First, The Purge Anarchy. Now, Selma. Go Carmen.

  

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b.Touch
Member since Jun 28th 2011
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Thu May-07-15 06:53 AM

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111. "RE: Powerful. The following folks will be going to the Oscars."
In response to Reply # 20


  

          

Ava also said she wanted to stay
>away from the obvious Civil Rights period markers like the
>60's Motown soundtrack, and the singing of the Negro
>spirituals during the protests, and come up with something
>fresh and new. And that, this is.

I noticed they went for Stax and the Impressions instead, which is probably more location accurate for 1965 Alabama than the Supremes and whatnot. And I'm sure "Ole Man Trouble" by Otis Redding was chosen for the exact irony it brings.

  

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
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Wed Nov-26-14 07:25 PM

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22. "Independent Spirit Awards Noms!"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://pbs.twimg.com/media/B3U_Vw-CQAAe6Y0.png:large
http://twitter.com/selmamovie

Best Feature
Best Director
Best Male Lead
Best Supporting Female
Best Cinematography

Next, Golden Globes and Oscars!

  

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upUPNorth
Member since Oct 12th 2005
1444 posts
Wed Nov-26-14 09:23 PM

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23. "Toronto residents interested in this film"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

The TIFF Bell Lightbox is hosting an advance screening of this film on Wednesday December 10 at 7:15 pm for which both Ava DuVernay and David Oyelowo will be in attendance, including post-film discussion.

Right now I just got my ticket as a Lightbox member thanks to an advance email, public tickets will be available December 3rd. I get tickets for half price, if anyone hit me up certain they'd attend I can see how many more tickets I can get on my own if only for the $6.25 price point, I don't know if it's expected to sell out they just give 'members' early access.

---------------------
Obviously White

  

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Riot
Member since May 25th 2005
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Thu Nov-27-14 01:36 PM

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25. "Ava DuVernay at the NY screening"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

her family is actually from selma

fav story she told was how her dad recalled witnessing all the issues and marching thru the town 50 years ago, blk folks not allowed across town, MLK not allowed to stand on the steps of city hall

only to be driving around this year and all the main streets shut down

and finding out it was bc his daughter had closed off downtown and city hall to shoot the movie



)))--####---###--(((

bunda
<-.-> ^_^ \^0^/
get busy living, or get busy dying.

  

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lfresh
Member since Jun 18th 2002
92693 posts
Mon Dec-01-14 11:55 AM

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28. "oh thats fantastic"
In response to Reply # 25


  

          

>her family is actually from selma
>
>fav story she told was how her dad recalled witnessing all the
>issues and marching thru the town 50 years ago, blk folks not
>allowed across town, MLK not allowed to stand on the steps of
>city hall
>
>only to be driving around this year and all the main streets
>shut down
>
>and finding out it was bc his daughter had closed off downtown
>and city hall to shoot the movie


~~~~
When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices. Live so that when you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.
~~~~
You cannot hate people for their own good.

  

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bwood
Member since Apr 03rd 2006
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Sun Nov-30-14 07:26 PM

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26. "If you can't fuck with this movie, I can't fuck with you. Period."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Visually stunning. Thought provoking. And so relevant to today's climate cause shit hasn't changed after 40 years.


David as MLK...holy shit...

The whole cast is incredible.

Can't wait to see this again.

------------------------------------------
America from 9:00 on: https://youtu.be/GUwLCQU10KQ

  

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lfresh
Member since Jun 18th 2002
92693 posts
Fri Dec-05-14 12:50 PM

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29. "Making History With ‘Selma,’ Ava DuVernay Seeks a Different Equality"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/07/movies/ava-duvernay-makes-a-mark-with-selma.html?partner=rss&emc=rss&smid=tw-nytimes&_r=0


On a swampy afternoon in late June, the director Ava DuVernay stood not far from the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., that haunted place where, President Lyndon B. Johnson told the country, history and fate met. She was instructing a group of white extras on all the ugly things she wanted them to yell at the several hundred black extras snaking across the bridge, part of a sizable army of cast and crew that had been gathered together for “Selma,” her new movie about the campaign for black voter rights.

That day, Ms. DuVernay was restaging Bloody Sunday, March 7, 1965, when the police violently attacked marchers trying to walk to Montgomery, where they would eventually hear the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s call out to the world: “How long? Not long! Because the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.” A centrifugal force, Ms. DuVernay rarely seemed to stop moving. As she called “Action!,” and people and horses began to run, smoke flooding the air, it was thrilling to witness a female director bring this agonizing American story to life and, in the process, stake her own claim on our cultural history.

Ms. DuVernay, 42, belongs to what she calls “a small sorority” of black female filmmakers, who are part of another modest American sisterhood: female directors of any color. And with “Selma,” she has done what few female directors get the opportunity to do, which is go large — with politics and history — with a decent budget and serious muscle. Paramount Pictures is releasing the movie on Dec. 25, and the producers include Oprah Winfrey, who has a small role in the movie as an activist, and Plan B, Brad Pitt’s company. Four years ago, Kathryn Bigelow became the first woman to win an Academy Award as best director; Ms. DuVernay has a shot to become the second.

Like many, I had hoped Ms. Bigelow’s Oscar for “The Hurt Locker” would be transformative, and that soon female directors would be accepted as equal to men, and, crucially, hired as equals. But that hasn’t happened. In 2009, when “The Hurt Locker” was released, women made up 7 percent of the directors on the top 250 domestic grossing films, according to an annual report by the researcher Martha M. Lauzen. As of early December, by my count, only 19 women — 7.6 percent — were directors on the top 250 grossing features released this year. “Selma” may increase that percentage, as might another big-studio release, Angelina Jolie’s “Unbroken,” about the Olympic runner and war prisoner Louis Zamperini.

It will take more than these two filmmakers to disrupt the industry’s sexism, which has long shut women out from directing movies and, increasingly, shuts them out on screen, too. Notably, Ms. DuVernay and Ms. Jolie, having made movies about women, have now made the leap to bigger stakes with stories centered on men. I hope their movies burn up the box office, but I also hope they return to movies about women. We need those stories, and these days, female directors are often the only ones interested in them. Gender equality is an undeniable imperative. But it’s also essential to the future of the movies: This American art became great with stories about men and women, not just a superhero and some token chick.

Continue reading the main story
Ms. DuVernay’s path to “Selma” is unusual, not only because she belongs to a small sorority, but also because she came to directing through publicity. After graduating from the University of California, Los Angeles (she majored in English and African-American studies), she had a flirtation with broadcast journalism before landing a publicity job. At 27, she founded her own agency, working on movies by the likes of Steven Spielberg, which embedded her in every stage of the movie process, all the way to award shows. She was on the set of “Collateral” (2004) the moment that she realized what she wanted.

“I just remember standing there in the middle of the night in East L.A. and watching Michael Mann direct and thinking, ‘I have stories,’ ” she said. “That was the moment I thought: ‘Wow, I could do this. I would like to do that.’ ”

She narrated this origin story back home in Los Angeles in September, as we talked in her house, a midcentury perch overlooking Beachwood Canyon with a view of the Hollywood sign. Hours earlier, she had, in the fashion of 21st century cinema, delivered her cut of “Selma” through a high-speed file transfer. Now people whose opinions mattered — including the producers on the Paramount lot a few miles away and the famous one in Chicago (“Ms. Winfrey,” as Ms. DuVernay calls her) — were looking at “Selma” for the first time.

“Your foot is shaking,” I said. “Are you nervous?”

Ms. DuVernay radiates terrific self-confidence, but I assumed that she was anxious. “No,” she shot back.

With its $20 million production budget and the support of a major studio, “Selma” is far bigger than any of Ms. DuVernay’s previous movies. She made her last one, “Middle of Nowhere,” for $200,000. A small-scale, lapidary drama about a woman finding love, though mostly herself, it was beautifully shot by the cinematographer Bradford Young. (They reunited for “Selma.”) It was well received at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival, but, like the rest of the entries that year, it was overshadowed by the juggernaut known as “Beasts of the Southern Wild.” Ms. DuVernay became the first black woman to win the dramatic directing award at Sundance, and while that was gratifying, it didn’t translate into any immediate gains. “No one offered me anything,” she said matter-of-factly.

This is in stark contrast with what happened to Colin Trevorrow, whose first feature, “Safety Not Guaranteed,” was also at the 2012 festival. In what has become a familiar story of male success, he went on to direct the relaunch of a franchise behemoth, “Jurassic World.” Women rarely receive those kinds of big breaks. The director Mimi Leder (“Deep Impact”) and the writer Linda Woolverton (“Maleficent”) have made a lot of money for the industry, but they recently told me they, too, don’t get the calls that you might expect. That no one clamored to hire Ms. DuVernay is even less a surprise given the segregation of American cinema and an industry mind-set that deems that a movie with two black leads is no longer simply a movie but a black movie.

Continue reading the main story
Ms. DuVernay started directing first in documentary, where budgets tend to be low, and you don’t necessarily need to ask anyone’s permission, two reasons so many women may gravitate to the field. She made her first feature, “This Is the Life” (2008), a documentary about a Los Angeles hip-hop scene, for $10,000: check to check as she put it. She subsequently took $50,000 that she had saved to buy a house and used it to make her first dramatic feature, “I Will Follow” (2010), an autobiographical tale about a niece mourning an aunt. Ms. DuVernay released the movie through a distribution company she founded (she’s a busy woman) and sank $100,000 of the profits into “Middle of Nowhere.”

Through it all she kept her day job, which is how she came to “Selma.” In January 2010, The Daily News in New York ran an item about the script, by Paul Webb, and a scene in which Dr. King flirts with a prostitute or, as The News put it, “MLK Flick has Tryst Issues.” (There’s no such scene in the final movie.) Ms. DuVernay was tapped as a liaison between King family members and the filmmakers. Nothing ever came of that, however, because the project fell apart when Lee Daniels, who was set to be the director, left after years of trying to make the screenplay work with the budget he had been given.

Ms. DuVernay said that the first director who considered “Selma” was Mr. Mann, who was followed by an intriguing list of directors that she ticked off with a practiced air: Stephen Frears, Paul Haggis, Spike Lee and finally Mr. Daniels. She said that with the exit of Mr. Daniels the producers “just gave up.” David Oyelowo (pronounced oh-YELL-ow-oh), who plays Dr. King, did not. Ms. DuVernay had cast him in “Middle of Nowhere,” and he believed that she could handle “Selma.” He made his case for her in a letter to Pathé, the company that originally financed the movie. (Paramount came onboard later.)

Mr. Oyelowo, speaking by phone, said: “If Tom Hooper is allowed to do ‘The King’s Speech,’ having not necessarily done films of a much bigger budget for Pathé, then why not? Why not take a punt on her?”

He said Ms. DuVernay had to do some rewriting of the script to work with a budget that was lower than she ended up with. What had been a liability for her — directing with tiny sums of money — became an unexpected asset and, unlike all the male directors, she was able to make the script and budget work together. At some point, Mr. Oyelowo said, everyone realized that she was the one: “If we can’t make it work with her, this film is never going to work. It’s just never going to happen.”

“Selma” is certainly modest when compared to mega-blockbusters, where $200 million production budgets are no longer uncommon. (Throw in more for marketing and distribution.) For independents, though, and especially for women, it’s significant. (The production budget often cited for “The Hurt Locker” is about $15 million.) The day I visited the “Selma” set, I was struck by how Ms. DuVernay had made the leap from low-budget filmmaking with a handful of people to commanding hundreds. “I just need some white racists on this side!” she yelled at one point. She later complained that the day had been chaotic, but she looked fully in command, her long hair tucked under a scarf, whether riding shotgun on a cart with Mr. Young or on the ground. Later, when lunch was called, Ms. DuVernay greeted the extras who poured off the bridge, calling out thanks and giving and receiving hugs. Among the marchers were men and women who had been there when the tear gas and blood were real. The march, she said, is “a sensitive subject matter to that community,” and she was navigating through a weighty legacy.
At the same time, I was watching a very smart filmmaker command a veritable army partly with hugs. Movie sets can be very unfriendly spaces for women, as she knows. Before she started shooting, she recalled, she sat down with “every single person” on the crew and said, “I’m inviting you to work with me, so this is going to run in the way that I want it to run.”

Even before “Selma,” Ms. DuVernay had beaten the terrible odds that women face by making her own movies on her own terms. It has brought her new attention, but, in deciding what’s next, she needs to choose carefully. Women don’t always get second chances if they stumble, and they don’t have a long, rich history of female filmmakers to learn from. “Do I play that game and try to figure out what the next move is?” Ms. DuVernay wondered. “Or can I be like these guys that just do whatever the interesting stuff is?”

One of those guys is Cary Fukunaga, who went from directing indies like “Sin Nombre” to the HBO show “True Detective.” “The way that these men move,” Ms. DuVernay said admiringly. “The more proven way is to just stay a good girl,” she added “but the artist in me wants to move like Fukunaga’s moving.”

I checked in with Ms. DuVernay again in November after she had locked “Selma.” Screenings had gone well, and Oscar talk was building. She was tired and after two long years on the movie, suddenly unemployed. She won’t be for long. No matter what happens, she believes she can always raise enough money to shoot a new movie.

And while she wants to continue making movies about women, “Selma” has opened her up to new ideas about how she too can move. Her earlier narrative features, she said, were “very interior, intimate stories,” but, “Selma,” with its set pieces and action scenes, has freed her to think about telling larger stories about women.

“It’s not really all about money,” she said, parsing the challenges women directors face. “Some of it is about allowing our imaginations — and giving ourselves permission — to go outside.”
~~~~
When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices. Live so that when you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.
~~~~
You cannot hate people for their own good.

  

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
83325 posts
Fri Dec-05-14 01:20 PM

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30. "I think about this movie nearly every day. Multiple times a day."
In response to Reply # 0
Fri Dec-05-14 01:20 PM by Frank Longo

  

          

Considering the current climate, I take by what I said. This could win Best Picture. Any Academy member who reads a newspaper will be reminded daily how great this movie is.

This could end up being a year when the top two candidates for Best Picture, Boyhood and SELMA, are both fucking great movies. What a fantastic turn of events that would be.

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
3206 posts
Thu Dec-11-14 12:30 PM

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31. "Golden Globe Noms!"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Best Motion Picture, Drama
Best Director, Motion Picture
Best Actor, Drama
Best Original Song

  

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SoulHonky
Member since Jan 21st 2003
25919 posts
Thu Dec-11-14 02:40 PM

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32. "Impressive and Important"
In response to Reply # 0
Thu Dec-11-14 02:40 PM by SoulHonky

          

A tremendous movie and one that, sadly, is still very much needed to day. Protesters could learn from King's focus and that his protests had specific goals. The "Racism is over" crowd learns that racism isn't one war but a million little battles and victory often just means progress and not an end to racism. LBJ dropping an N-bomb was the perfect reminder of how the success of protests could only change so much.

Not just a great movie, I think it's an important picture of a time in our history that shouldn't be forgotten.

----
NBA MOCK DRAFT #1 - https://thecourierclass.com/whole-shebang/2017/5/18/2017-nba-mock-draft-1-just-lotto-and-lotta-trades

  

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
3206 posts
Mon Dec-15-14 11:10 PM

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33. "NYC: Regal Union Square Stadium 14, Opening Dec. 24th"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

  

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nipsey
Charter member
9890 posts
Tue Dec-16-14 07:32 PM

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34. "The King family doesn't like anyone making a MLK movie"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I didn't realize that "Selma" wasn't "official". I thought it actually had the blessing of the King family. Apparently not. I think the screenwriter did an excellent job of evoking MLK without using his actual words. Impressive. Because in watching the movie, it felt like they were actual speeches made by him.

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/oscars-how-selma-filmmakers-made-755242

EXCERPT:

"Because King's speeches were licensed to another project, Selma's filmmakers had to find a way to re-create the meaning of MLK's words without tres­passing on his actual, historic language. That means they had to rewrite MLK, though sometimes this meant just altering a verb or two. During the scene at the funeral of civil rights demonstrator Jimmie Lee Jackson, for instance, the MLK in the film gives a rousing oratory, asking the crowd, "Who murdered Jimmie Lee Jackson?" In real life, King asked, "Who killed him?" In another scene, King rallies protestors with the words, "Give us the vote," while in reality King said, "Give us the ballot." The film skirts close to the words without using them."


____________________________________
Podcast Now on iTunes and Google:
http://tinyurl.com/JTTOU-iTunesSubscribe
Twitter: @nipsey @JTTOUPodcast

Last 3 things I watched:

Line of Duty Season 4 (Amazon Prime) : B
Psych 2 (Peacock): B-
Umbrella Academy Seaso

  

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ZooTown74
Member since May 29th 2002
43582 posts
Wed Dec-17-14 10:24 AM

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35. "Well, "the screenwriter," Ava DuVernay, won't get credit for "
In response to Reply # 34


  

          

the work she put in.

As I noted above, her creative fingerprints are all over this movie. She did a page-1 rewrite of the script but won't get credit because the original writer's deal says he is entitled to sole writing credit. And neither of them are in the WGA, so arbitration is not an option.

________________________________________________________________________________
Niggas made aliases.

  

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
83325 posts
Wed Dec-17-14 10:39 AM

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36. "I was wondering why she wasn't credited."
In response to Reply # 35


  

          

Fascinating.

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

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nipsey
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Wed Dec-17-14 03:26 PM

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38. "I didn't realize she did a rewrite"
In response to Reply # 35


  

          

____________________________________
Podcast Now on iTunes and Google:
http://tinyurl.com/JTTOU-iTunesSubscribe
Twitter: @nipsey @JTTOUPodcast

Last 3 things I watched:

Line of Duty Season 4 (Amazon Prime) : B
Psych 2 (Peacock): B-
Umbrella Academy Seaso

  

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
3206 posts
Wed Dec-17-14 11:52 AM

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37. "MLK III said....."
In response to Reply # 34


  

          

http://twitter.com/AVAETC/status/544293217085431808

  

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ZooTown74
Member since May 29th 2002
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Thu Dec-18-14 01:38 AM

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39. "GOOD. This whole "controversy" was starting to smell like some"
In response to Reply # 37
Thu Dec-18-14 01:38 AM by ZooTown74

  

          

awards season campaign hater shit, designed to pull any possible votes and goodwill away from this movie.

That fucking quote should be in the commercials and newspaper ads for this movie, starting next week. Let's dead this bullshit now.

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
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Fri Dec-19-14 11:30 AM

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40. "NYC: also showing at BAM Cinemas opening Dec. 25th"
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http://www.bam.org/film/2015/selma

  

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Tony Sparks
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41. "wow. what a movie. "
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SoWhat
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42. "nice move w/the 'select' cities - but why no Chicago?"
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NYC/LA...of course.

DC/ATL...chocolate.

so why not Chicago? and Detroit?

fuck you.

  

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b.Touch
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Fri Dec-26-14 07:32 AM

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43. "$$$$"
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That, and Paramount probably doesn't want it stepping on "Top Five", which is also a Paramount film.

  

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Laz aka Black Native
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44. "Why not Birmingham &/or Montgomery for the Christmas debut?"
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This is where it went down! Anyway, excellent film & the timing of the release is very apropos to the times now.

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lfresh
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Sat Dec-27-14 05:00 AM

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45. "masterful"
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Fascinating look at an important microcosm in the macrocosm of the civil right struggle allof the angles seemed covered and roles played non were small all were key
~~~~
When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices. Live so that when you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.
~~~~
You cannot hate people for their own good.

  

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nipsey
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46. "Smear Campaign against "Selma" in effect?"
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I guess it's to be expected every awards season, but its disheartening nonetheless. The past week has seen a number of articles written that appear to take the shine off of "Selma". I guess folks are really scared it might win big this awards season.



Deadline is giving this story about the crew member who was injured over the summer some run. I believe the story was first reported when it happened in June. Now it's being brought up again during the height of awards season?

https://deadline.com/2014/12/selma-accident-crew-worker-electrocuted-1201338224/

I'm sure you've heard about the criticism the movie has received from people who claim LBJ is shown in an inaccurate light and that Selma was HIS idea.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/the-movie-selma-has-a-glaring-historical-inaccuracy/2014/12/26/70ad3ea2-8aa4-11e4-a085-34e9b9f09a58_story.html

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/selma-disappoints-lyndon-b-johnson-760379

http://variety.com/2014/film/news/oscar-hopefuls-selma-imitation-game-under-attack-as-mudslinging-begins-1201388987/

http://www.usatoday.com/story/life/movies/2014/12/30/who-should-be-the-true-hero-of-selma-mlk-or-lbj/21050541/



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nipsey
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51. "EW Fact Checks Selma"
In response to Reply # 46


  

          

http://insidemovies.ew.com/2015/01/03/fact-checking-selma/

Fact-Checking the Film: 'Selma'
By Jeff Labrecque on Jan 3, 2015 at 9:00AM @JeffLabrecque

Oscar season is here, which means a flurry of fact-based movies are in theaters. EW is fact-checking these films—everything from The Theory of Everything to Wild—to see just how true-to-life they turned out.


Selma has won critical raves for its depiction of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the crucial 50-mile civil-rights march from the small Alabama town to the state capitol in Montgomery in March 1965. But the stirring and tense historical drama, which opened in select theaters on Dec. 25 and expands on Jan. 9, has also drawn the ire of some historians and members of President Lyndon Johnson’s administration who resent the way that LBJ is portrayed in director Ava DuVernay’s film.
Written by Paul Webb (with uncredited input from DuVernay), Selma tells the riveting story of how King and other civil-right leaders chose Selma to press for the right to vote in Southern states, where registering was made difficult if not impossible for African-Americans. In 1964, Johnson had pushed through the Civil Rights Act that supposedly outlawed discrimination. But in practice, blacks remained prohibited from voting in several old-Confederacy states that were lagging in their enforcement of new federal integration and equal-rights laws. A year and half after his “I Have a Dream” speech at the March on Washington, and a month after accepting the Nobel Peace Prize, King brought his celebrity and his strategy of non-violent protest to Selma to demand that Alabama’s most politically intransigent counties allow African-Americans on the voting rolls.


Movie: After King (David Oyelowo) accepts the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo, a terrorist bombing of a black church in Birmingham kills four girls.

Real life: King accepted his Nobel in December 1964, shortly before turning his attention to Selma. The horrific blast in Birmingham occurred more than a year earlier, on Sept. 15, 1963. But King cited the tragedy in his speech, giving the filmmakers license to fit the two events together. Even if it’s not immediately clear that the shocking blast is a flashback, the two scenes work together to establish the stakes for King and other black Americans in 1964-65.


Movie: Jimmie Lee Jackson (Keith Stanfield) is murdered by an Alabama state trooper while trying to protect his mother and grandfather from being beaten during a nighttime march in Marion, Ala.

Real life: Jackson, 26, was shot twice by a trooper inside a restaurant he and his mother and grandfather had slipped into after their nighttime march on Feb. 18, 1965 was violently set upon by police and vigilantes. He didn’t die on the restaurant floor, as depicted in the film, but stumbled back into the street, where he was beaten further. He clung to life for a week before dying, and he became a martyr for the Selma marches that followed.


Movie: President Johnson (Tom Wilkinson) is mistrustful of King’s agenda and rejects his urgent pleas for federal legislation that will specifically secure and protect the right to vote for minorities. He resents King’s meddling activism and needs to be dragged to a point of acquiescence before taking up the cause. In fact, Johnson is portrayed as one of the film’s antagonists, though not as dastardly as Alabama governor George Wallace (Tim Roth) and the local Selma rednecks.

Real life: This has become a major point of controversy, since Johnson had lobbied King to make the right to vote his next major project and to find the perfect battleground—i.e., one with a short-fused segregationist government that would violently attack protests—in order to galvanize the nation. Just before his 1965 inauguration, Johnson spoke with King by phone and said the following:
LBJ: I think that you can contribute a great deal by getting your leaders and you yourself, taking very simple examples of discrimination … you can find the worst condition that you run into in Alabama, Mississippi, or Louisiana, or South Carolina, … and if you just take that one illustration and get it on radio and get it on television and get it in the pulpits, get it in the meetings, get it every place you can, pretty soon the fellow that didn’t do anything but follow—drive a tractor, he’s say, “Well, that’s not right. That’s not fair.” … And then that will help us on what we’re going to shove through in the end.

DuVarnay has responded to the criticism with a tweet: “Notion that Selma was LBJ’s idea is jaw dropping and offensive to and black citizens who made it so.” She referred to a 2013 New Yorker story by Louis Menand that includes the following passage:

“… But voting-rights provisions did not address the use of voter-qualification tests to disenfranchise registrants on the basis of race. Johnson recognized the need for additional voting-rights legislation, and he directed Nicholas Katzenbach, soon to be his attorney general, to draft it. ‘I want you to write me the goddamnest toughest voting rights act that you can devise,’ is the way he put it. But then progress slowed. Johnson had the most ambitious legislative agenda of any President since F.D.R. (his idol), and he explained to King that he was worried that Southern opposition to more civil-rights legislation would drain support from the War on Poverty and hold up bills on Medicare, immigration reform, and aid to education. He asked King to wait. King thought that if you waited for the right time for direct action (as nonviolent protests were called) you would never act. So on Jan. 2, 1965, he went to Selma, where efforts by local activists and members of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee to register African-Americans had been under way, with little success, for several years.”

Andrew Young, who was close to King during the Selma marches and went on to become a U.S. congressman and Atlanta mayor, told the Washington Post that King and Johnson’s relationship “was the only thing I would question in the movie. Everything else, they got 100 percent right.”



Movie: Johnson swats away King’s demands for prompt action on voting rights with a dismissive, “You’ve got one big issue… I got 101.”

Real life: Every president has to juggle competing issues, but in early 1965, Johnson was focused on Vietnam and the hugely fateful decision whether to commit the full weight of the American military to prop up a failing South Vietnamese regime. Vietnam leaks into Selma only sparingly, when John Lewis is quoted as saying, “‘I don’t see how President Johnson can send troops to Vietnam … and can’t send troops to Selma.” In reality, Vietnam was consuming Johnson’s mind and soul 24/7. But then, this isn’t a movie about Johnson and Vietnam.



Movie: King is absent from the first Selma march, so-called Bloody Sunday, after the Alabama state troopers and horseback posse brutally attack the unarmed and peaceful marchers on the Edmund Pettus Bridge. The film suggests that he was delayed in Atlanta to steady his faltering marriage.

Real life: According to Taylor Branch’s history of the civil-rights movement during the King years, At Canaan’s Edge, King had tried to postpone the march until Monday, but he was then convinced on Sunday morning to let the march begin without him because of a large turnout. King never really believed the initial march would get far; Wallace had declared that he would not allow it to take place, and King replied that if they were stopped, they would just “lie down in the road” rather than provoke an altercation. King may have assumed the Sunday march would quickly end in inevitable arrests, and he would arrive on Monday to mount a second, stronger attempt. But it’s also impossible to ignore the very real death threats that King faced daily, and that he would’ve been extremely vulnerable during the march in hostile territory. “To give himself some wiggle room about Lowndes County, he told reporters that he might break away from the four-day pilgrimage and rejoin its conclusion in Montgomery,” Branch wrote. King’s father, also a minister, was always aware of that danger, and some of King’s inner circle suspected that the elder pastor had exaggerated an illness that Sunday so that King would stay in Atlanta to preside over mass at his parish in his stead. There does not seem to be any documented evidence that King stayed in Atlanta to smooth over marital discord.



Movie: An anonymous tape is sent to Coretta Scott King (Carmen Ejogo) that accuses King of infidelity, and when he’s confronted by her about the rumors, he indirectly confirms her suspicions.

Real life: King did have mistresses, and he was, in fact, engaging in an extramarital affair in the weeks surrounding the Selma marches. He later confessed to his wife, and presumably, considering the anonymous letters that did get mailed to her home, she had suspicions in 1965. However, there were other major stresses on their marriage, beginning with the obvious: the constant death threats against King and his children. Moreover, King insisted on living in relative modesty—a theme that DuVernay captures in Selma‘s opening scene, as King laments getting dressed up for the Nobel ceremony—and the couple rented a house for years. But since Coretta rarely traveled with her husband, out of fear that assassins could make their four children orphans, she was left home while King was whisked off on jets and living a life normally reserved for heads of state.



Movie: The FBI monitors King closely and was responsible, with Johnson’s approval, for the anonymous letter and audio tape that caused the fracture in his marriage.

Real life: FBI director J. Edgar Hoover despised King and started bugging his offices and phone lines when he suspected that King was a Communist. The Nobel committee’s decision to honor King with the Peace Prize agitated Hoover to no end, and he authorized the blackmail package that advised King to commit suicide rather than have his dirty laundry aired in public. “You are done,” the letter threatened. “There is but one way out for you. You better take it before your filthy, abnormal, fraudulent self is bared to the nation.” To his credit, however, it appears that Johnson never ordered the crude package or used the illicit surveillance against King.



Movie: When King is feeling depressed, he calls Mahalia Jackson (Ledisi Young) late at night and asks her to sing to him.

Real life: The legendary gospel singer had become a constant and soothing presence around King ever since the 1956 Montgomery bus boycott. She played a crucial role in many of his campaigns, including the March on Washington, where she urged him to share his dream with the people. She became his lifeline when he had no place left to turn. “I guess you would put it now as ‘telephone gospel therapy,'” King’s attorney Clarence B. Jones told NPR in 2013. “And he would speak to Mahalia Jackson and he would say, ‘Mahalia, please sing to me. I’m having a rough day today.’ And she would sing one or more of his favorite songs, and … he would close his eyes listening to her. In some cases, tears would come down his face and then he would say, ‘Mahalia, you are giving me the Lord’s voice this morning.'”



Movie: When King first arrives in a Selma hotel, he is welcomed with a sucker-punch in the face by a white man.

Real life: James George Robinson, a member of the National States’ Rights Party, assaulted King in the lobby of the Hotel Albert in Selma. The bigot actually got two punches in to King’s head and a kick to the groin. He was arrested, fined $100, and sentenced to 60 days in jail.



Movie: Coretta Scott King meets with Malcolm X (Nigel Thatch) in Selma, while Martin is in a local jail. He fumes when he hears that she’s met with his rival.

Real life: Malcolm X and King had met only once, for a brief moment in Washington, D.C., in March 1964, and the two men had conflicting visions and methods for attaining equality: whereas King preached non-violence, Malcolm X demonized white America and was more confrontational. Malcolm X had belittled King at every turn, calling him an Uncle Tom and a “traitor to the Negro race.” But by early 1965, Malcolm X had somewhat softened his stance after splitting from the Nation of Islam. As the film correctly depicts, when he arrived in Selma, he claimed to be there only to help—not to hijack the proceedings. “I didn’t come to Selma to make his job difficult,” he assured Coretta, according to her biography. “I really did come thinking that I could make it easier. If the white people realize what the alternative is, perhaps they will be more willing to hear Dr. King.” Malcolm X was assassinated in Harlem just a few weeks after meeting with Coretta.



Movie: King’s organization, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, is not always on the same page with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, led by John Lewis (Stephan James) and James Forman (Trai Byers), who’d laid much of the groundwork in Selma. Lewis split with SNCC to march on Bloody Sunday, where his skull was fractured in the melee. Later, SNCC leadership, which had boycotted the initial march, criticized King for turning back on the second march.

Real life: The SNCC resented King’s celebrity and the SCLC’s tendency to swoop in at the perfect moment to steal their thunder. Lewis, however, elected to march and was welcomed in the ranks. After Sunday’s violence, however, the SNCC became committed to the subsequent march and was incredulous when King failed to follow through.



Movie: The second march is scheduled for Tuesday, two days after Bloody Sunday, and King is back in Selma to lead it. The White House sends Assistant Attorney General John Doar (Alessandro Nivola) to Selma to persuade King to postpone the demonstration until the federal government could protect the marchers. King leads the march as planned back across the Edmund Pettus Bridge where the same Alabama state troopers await—but this time, the police make way, opening the path to Montgomery. But instead of marching forward, King takes a knee in prayer. The followers wait for his command. Then, he turns around and leads the procession back to the church where they had gathered.

Real life: In the film, Doar hints ever-so-slightly to King about a deal where he would agree to postpone the second march to a later date when the federal government would completely endorse it. In reality, there was a negotiation, with former Florida governor LeRoy Collins playing go-between. He floated the idea to King about crossing the bridge but then turning around, so as not to violate the recent court-order prohibiting the march. (King was always adamant that non-violent protest had an obligation to follow the law; plus, he needed the federal government’s eventual support if his cause had any prayer at success.) As King and his supporters made their way to the bridge on Tuesday afternoon, Collins arrived to tell King that he’d secured a pledge from the troopers not to attack as long as the processions followed a particular route. Still, no one knew what King would do. Nor could they predict what might happen if one shot was fired by an itchy trigger-finger trooper or a rock thrown by an angry protestor. As in the film, the troopers did clear the road when ordered, tempting King and the marchers to continue. But after kneeling in prayer, King turned around and announced the march was over for the day. He hoped that others would follow him back to the church. Many were perplexed and others angered by what they saw as King blinking. But as King says in the film, “I’d rather people be upset and hate me than be bleeding or dead.” Two weeks later, after the injunction had been lifted against the march, King led his group back across the bridge towards Montgomery. With federal protection en route, they trekked the 50 miles to the state capitol in five days.



Movie: A white minister named James Reeb (Jeremy Strong), who heeded King’s call and came down from Boston to march on Montgomery, is targeted by epithet-spouting white segregationists the night after the second march, beaten senseless with clubs, and dies.

Real life: The film captures this tragic gruesome assault quite accurately and vividly, though there were two other victims—not just one other companion with Reeb. Reeb lingered for two days before dying, but his chances for survival suffered when red-tape and vehicular misfortune cost him two hours before he was treated at an emergency room. Reeb’s murder was another disgrace that angered many stunned Americans who were watching the evening news or reading the morning paper. Four days after his death, Johnson spoke to Congress and the nation and pleaded for prompt and full legislation guaranteeing all Americans the right to vote. “So it was a century ago at Appomattox. So it was last week in Selma, Alabama. There, long suffering men and women peacefully protested the denial of their rights as Americans. Many of them were brutally assaulted. One good man—a man of God—was killed,” said LBJ. “But even if we pass this bill the battle will not be over. What happened in Selma is part of a far larger movement which reaches into every section and state of America. It is the effort of American Negroes to secure for themselves the full blessings of American life. Their cause must be our cause too. Because it’s not just Negroes, but really it’s all of us, who must overcome the crippling legacy of bigotry and injustice. And we shall overcome.”
Reeb’s killers were never convicted; three Southern men were acquitted by an all-white jury.

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nipsey
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53. "And another "historian" questions the movie"
In response to Reply # 46


  

          

Did historians put in this much work to highlight the inaccuracies in "Lincoln"? It is a movie. Not a documentary. Dramatic license was taken in many instances. EW has a pretty good breakdown of fact vs. fiction in "Selma". Despite the changes made for dramatic purposes, the movie faithfully captures the spirit of the civil rights movement and what happened in Selma.


http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/history-professor-criticizes-selma-errors-760999?utm_source=twitter

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
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Sat Jan-03-15 05:28 PM

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56. "There are few things more irritating..."
In response to Reply # 53
Sat Jan-03-15 05:28 PM by Frank Longo

  

          

... than the trend of "expert fact-checking" thinkpieces, in which non-filmmakers are interviewed on filmmaking matters.

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

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Jay Doz
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Tue Jan-06-15 09:42 AM

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75. "RE: And another "historian" questions the movie"
In response to Reply # 53


  

          

>Did historians put in this much work to highlight the
>inaccuracies in "Lincoln"?

yes.

http://www.slate.com/blogs/browbeat/2012/11/09/lincoln_historical_accuracy_sorting_fact_from_fiction_in_the_steven_spielberg.html

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/11/22/what-s-true-and-false-in-lincoln-movie.html

http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2012/11/fact-checking-lincoln-lincolns-mostly-realistic-his-advisers-arent/265073/

http://www.newyorker.com/news/hendrik-hertzberg/lincoln-v-lincoln

http://www.npr.org/2012/11/22/165671751/we-ask-a-historian-just-how-accurate-is-lincoln

http://www.thenation.com/blog/171461/trouble-steven-spielbergs-lincoln

-------
"A man who is good enough to shed his blood for his country is good enough to be given a square deal afterwards. More than that no man is entitled, and less than that no man shall have." - TR

  

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SoWhat
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61. "so it's like The Butler?"
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fuck you.

  

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DJ007
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47. "Bradford Young getting some love (deadline swipe)"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

CAN'T WAIT TO SEE THIS!!

http://deadline.com/2014/12/selma-bradford-young-black-cinematography-1201338543/

Bradford Young’s work on Ava DuVernay’s civil rights biopic Selma and JC Chandor’s A Most Violent Year landed him on Hollywood’s radar this Oscar season, but it also illuminates the diversity lacking year after year within the film industry and the Academy that represents it. Critics and DuVernay have praised Young’s aptitude for lensing African-American faces onscreen as beautifully as he does in Selma, Most Violent YearSelma postera film about Martin Luther King, Jr.’s private and public struggles to turn the tide of the voting rights movement. “I’m never satisfied with the way I see my people photographed in movies,” Young confessed to me over the phone before the holidays. “I think it comes from a lack of consciousness – if you grew up in a community where you don’t know black people, I wouldn’t suspect you would photograph them in a concerned way.”

RELATED AwardsLine: Spotlight On Cinematographers Roger Deakins and Bradford Young
Few working cinematographers today trained like Young, who lives in Washington D.C. and spent years honing his photographic skills on subjects of color. Selma Bradford Young“I went to a majority black elementary school, a majority black high school, I moved to Chicago when I was 15 and lived on the Southside in a majority black community,” he said. “All of the artists that my grandparents collected were black artists. All of the books on my grandparents’ shelf, my father’s shelf, my mother’s shelf, were about black people. My world, until I got to D.C., was really about blackness.”

At Howard University, Young studied under Haile Gerima and soaked up the work of DPs who came before him. “Ernest Dickerson, who was Spike Lee’s preferred cinematographer, went to Howard,” he said. “Arthur Jafa, who was Spike’s cinematographer on Crooklyn and was Julie Dash’s cinematographer on Daughters Of The Dust, went to Howard. Malik Sayeed, the incredible, talented, gifted god of lighting black folk, went to Howard as well. It was a treasure chest of references for me to imitate, mimic, and pay homage to. My training was geared toward exposing my community — this particular community.”

Mother of George Those watching the indie scene have seen Young on the rise in recent years. He won the Sundance cinematography prize for Dee Rees’ Pariah in 2011, the same year he shot fellow Sundance class of 2011 entry Restless City for Andrew Dosunmu. In 2012 he teamed with DuVernay on her Sundance-winning drama Middle Of Nowhere, which won the future Selma helmer top directing honors. Last year Young won the Sundance cinematography prize again for lensing Dosunmu’s Mother Of George and David Lowery’s Ain’t Them Bodies Saints.

“I have a deep concern about humanity, period,” Young said. “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints spoke to me because those are the grandchildren in time and spirit of all those amazing white folk during the Great Depression and the Dust Bowl who were subversive against Jim Crow. They were like, we’re going to throw down our own ignorance so we can all share the plow together. That for me is a glorious golden age in American history because it was the first time Americans were really invested in socialism, and I saw that in that script. There was no room for fascism and racism when you couldn’t eat.”

Pariah“Something like Selma, or Mother Of George, or Pariah — I know those people very well,” said Young. “They’re my grandparents, my aunts and uncles, my cousins. When I see Alike or Martin Luther King, I see my family. I love my family, so I wouldn’t photograph them any differently. And that’s a universal principle, whether you’re a white cinematographer or a Southeast Asian cinematographer. When you care about your people you’re going to do right by them, and that doesn’t have any technical boundaries.”

If nominated for an Oscar on January 15, the 37-year-old Louisville native will become only the second black cinematographer in history to earn an Academy Award nom. (Remi Adefarasin was the first with his nod for 1998’s Elizabeth.) It wouldn’t just be a historic moment for Young, the youngest contender in recent years in his field. DuVernay is the first black female director to earn a Golden Globe nomination for Best Director for Selma and the film is eyeing multiple categories at the Oscars.

Timing has been prescient for Selma, which Paramount released on Christmas on the heels of Ferguson and at the tail end of a year of unprecedented social action and outrage over race politics in America.

Selma MLK speech“I don’t want to make this overtly political, but I think it is overtly political, because I think in general Americans don’t know their history,” said Young. “And when you don’t know your history, you can’t humanize people that you subjected to mass social disenfranchisement, police brutality, slavery, sexism, xenophobia. When you’re not dealing with that as part of your history, you have no concern or care to represent those people in mass media in a real conscious way. My pedagogy around filmmaking is that it’s a medium that can raise the stakes for all of humanity.”

“Someone asked Ava at a Q&A, ‘Is this film timely?’ ” he continued. “She said, ‘It’s always going to be timely, because times haven’t changed for us.’ When you think about it that way it’s not about being timely, it’s just highlighting our continuous struggle to be human beings in the world.”
_____________________________________________________
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Musa
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48. "Safe for certain audiences and ignores very important figures"
In response to Reply # 0
Sat Jan-03-15 09:46 AM by Musa

  

          

/movements.

The film visually looked nice and a step up from average hollywood cenima which is usually trash in my opinion. With that said this film ignores women who were vital to the movement in Selma and down plays the one woman that is an organizer.

This film juxtaposed the "radical" element while totally ignoring the radical elements that were in Selma beside King and aka A young Stokley Carmichael who would change his name to Kwame Ture.

The Deacons for Defense and Justice where present in Selma.

The Lowndes County Freedom Organization (Black Panther Party) was present and organizing with SNCC in Selma and Dr. king and Ture in 1965.

And as always the white saviors. I'm surprised Brad Pitt wasn't one of the sympathizing Northern preachers or liberals.

This is so predictable and trite.

Tell the entire story.

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Frank Longo
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49. "I vehemently disagree with everything here."
In response to Reply # 48
Sat Jan-03-15 11:20 AM by Frank Longo

  

          

1. It's not a mini-series. As AO Scott pointed out in his review, you could give nearly everyone at the march his or her own film. This movie focuses on King. And it does a damn good job at giving other important figures their own moments considering the run-time restrictions. It's a hundred times better than other biopics in that sense.

2. What white savior are you talking about? The preacher who dies, which is a historically accurate moment? Surely that's not what you mean. That can't be what you mean.

3. This movie doesn't ignore women in the slightest. Again, considering it is focused on one particular figure, it does a beautiful job of developing a number of female characters within the restrictions of a cinematic runtime. Some of my favorite supporting female scenes/performances of the year were in this film.

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nipsey
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50. "^^^"
In response to Reply # 49


  

          

>1. It's not a mini-series. As AO Scott pointed out in his
>review, you could give nearly everyone at the march his or her
>own film. This movie focuses on King. And it does a damn good
>job at giving other important figures their own moments
>considering the run-time restrictions. It's a hundred times
>better than other biopics in that sense.

Right. It's a movie about King. There are so many figures involved in that movement there's no way they can all get shine in a movie about King.


>
>2. What white savior are you talking about? The preacher who
>dies, which is a historically accurate moment? Surely that's
>not what you mean. That can't be what you mean.

Yeah. I don't know what White Savior he's talking about. Yes these historical Black movies tend to have white saviors, but this one didn't.



>
>3. This movie doesn't ignore women in the slightest. Again,
>considering it is focused on one particular figure, it does a
>beautiful job of developing a number of female characters
>within the restrictions of a cinematic runtime. Some of my
>favorite supporting female scenes/performances of the year
>were in this film.

This movie actually portrayed the women as being integral to the movement.

Coretta: She held down the home while King was out there risking his life and cheating on her. She had to deal with fearing for the safety of her family and living a "modest" life as prescribed by King.

Tessa Thompson's character: The organization brought the movement to Selma on her recommendation. She laid the ground work in communicating with some of the locals.

Niecy Nash's character: Provided housing and support for the activists.

Oprah as Annie Lee Cooper: Her story was used to show viewers the struggles Blacks had to endure just to vote.

Lorraine Toussaint's character: Helped in organizing the march.


IMO, they did a decent job of including women in the story.


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Musa
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52. "Where was Kwame Ture?"
In response to Reply # 49


  

          

Where where the Deacons of Defense?

Where were the organizations that WORKED directly with King on Selma and considered radical.

The focus on white people joining the movement in while specifically ignoring the Black so called radical ones that were there the entire time is disrespectful and convient for white audiences.

Organizations such as SNCC and CORE were composed of half if not majority Women.

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Frank Longo
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55. "See my previous reply. All points are the same."
In response to Reply # 52


  

          

1. It's not a mini-series. They have under 2.5 hours to tell an entire story. And they covered a ton of historical figures and groups involved in the March.

2. I still have no idea what "white focus" you're talking about. There is one positive white character depicted here, James Reeb, whose involvement contains OBVIOUS narrative relevance. You can't not include him from a narrative perspective. If you're talking about him as the convenient for white audience character... well, you can't, unless you're ignoring his obvious narrative role, and I'll give you more credit than that. So I still don't know what white focus you mean.

3. There is a great deal of focus on women, from individual historical figures to countless images of women involved in the marches, protests, and so forth.

But if you disagree with these points, and counter with your same points again, then there's no point to continuing this circular discussion.

I just disagree. 100%. In every way, with every point.

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Musa
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57. "Your points are off because these people"
In response to Reply # 55


  

          

were beside king yet represented the younger more so called radical element that scared white America.

Do some research and see who was marching beside Dr. King and who gave a speech before him on the steps of the government building.

Finally you don't need a mini series to touch on the organizations or figures VITAL to Dr. Kings movement.

Hollywood is very slick to omit almost every single "radical" with the exception of Malcolm X.



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Frank Longo
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62. "Okay. You wanted a totally different movie."
In response to Reply # 57


  

          

I choose to judge this movie for the movie it was. Which was fantastic.

But you wanted something different. Okay.

I still can't fathom how you can't see how this is a major accomplishment in both biopic cinema history and African-American cinema history, but different strokes, I suppose.

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Musa
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64. "I do was the movie about Selma or Dr. MLK Jr"
In response to Reply # 62


  

          

?

Last I checked it was called SELMA correct?

Last I researched much work was being done in Selma by several organizations who worked DIRECTLY with Dr. King correct?

Last I researched Kwame Ture, James Foreman etc were vital in the movement and were not even depicted, named, mentioned or noted in the film correct?

Is this film about Selma or a half ass Dr. MLK jr impersonation?

What makes this film so good?

Did you know the Voting act was pretty much rendered useless last year?

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2014/01/16/the-supreme-court-gutted-the-voting-rights-act-now-a-bipartisan-gang-wants-to-put-it-back-together/

No mention of that at the end of the film when they tried to put a pretty bow on a very much open and continuing issue.

This is what I like to call revisionism and it is dangerous.

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kwemos
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65. "RE: I do was the movie about Selma or Dr. MLK Jr"
In response to Reply # 64


  

          

It may be named Selma but it was about MLK's experience of Selma. Not well you know everyone else. I haven't seen it yet but she can't win. Some people are attacking her for not giving LBJ enough credit and giving King et al too much. And you're saying it's a whitewash

  

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Frank Longo
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67. "Countless people have talked about why it's so good."
In response to Reply # 64


  

          

I don't feel the need to rehash what's been written about in numerous replies here and thoughtful pieces online.

You and I disagree. Completely. Which is fine.

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SoulHonky
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73. "How did they put a pretty bow on it?"
In response to Reply # 64


          

I mean, the President of the United States drops an N-bomb in the White House. People were still being murdered by the Klan. Not sure how you could come away with their being a bow on it.

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lfresh
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77. "they mentioned MLKs infidelity"
In response to Reply # 73
Thu Jan-08-15 12:09 PM by lfresh

  

          

i mean
thats a nono
and it was done and done well
in context to his wifes sacrifice
its a pretty well balanced movie
~~~~
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~~~~
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Musa
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78. "His wife was not a grassroots organizer"
In response to Reply # 77


  

          

she was not in any organization at the time.

No mention of the destruction of the voting rights act.

No mention of the USA government (Cointelpro/ President LBJ) being found guilty in the eventual assassination of Dr. King jr.

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SoulHonky
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79. "Nor was she in the movie."
In response to Reply # 78


          

Seems like your biggest beef is that the movie was called "Selma" instead of "MLK".

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Musa
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80. "You missed the point again"
In response to Reply # 79


  

          

my goodness.

No Ella Baker a KEY and PRIMARY organizer of SNCC.

Who just happened to be a woman.

My problem is that hollywood is slick with revisiting history and clearly blocking out the "radical" element that makes many white liberals and middle class blacks uncomfortable.

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kwemos
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81. "RE: You missed the point again"
In response to Reply # 80


  

          

They made a two hour movie about MLK. Maybe if it were 3 hours like Spike's Malcolm X they could have fit in every person, every detail. But for sake of time they used a representative of SNCC to point out differences, conflict, etc. They use Annie and Amelia to show their presence, their impact. But mostly the movie showed King, it's subject. It didn't try to wipe out the radical element. It talked about how that element was viewed by white people, how King viewed it, how they viewed King. But for sake of time they couldn't give you everyone. It was a movie about MLK. I think Ava Duvernay did a good job.

  

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Musa
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83. "Wrong these are not details these are vital facts."
In response to Reply # 81


  

          

You would not have the Black Panthers if not for Selma.

You would not have had the "Black Power" or "Hell No we won't go" chants that shaped the culture of that time.

You would not have Dr. King in Selma if not for the work of grassroots organizers.

These are not details these are over arching FACTS.

Also the movie should be called the Dr. King show as said by Dr. Carr and Armond White because it was not much about what was really happening in Selma. Stop with the Bs

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kwemos
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84. "RE: Wrong these are not details these are vital facts."
In response to Reply # 83


  

          

>You would not have the Black Panthers if not for Selma.
>
>You would not have had the "Black Power" or "Hell No we won't
>go" chants that shaped the culture of that time.
>
>You would not have Dr. King in Selma if not for the work of
>grassroots organizers.
>
>These are not details these are over arching FACTS.
>
>Also the movie should be called the Dr. King show as said by
>Dr. Carr and Armond White because it was not much about what
>was really happening in Selma. Stop with the Bs

Shut the hell up man. The end.

  

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SoulHonky
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87. "Your last line is what everyone has been saying."
In response to Reply # 83


          

>Also the movie should be called the Dr. King show as said by
>Dr. Carr and Armond White because it was not much about what
>was really happening in Selma. Stop with the Bs

It's MLK centric because it's a movie about MLK, not about Selma.
Bringing up Selma's importance in the Black Panthers has little to do with the story about MLK that the filmmakers were trying to tell. Because the movie was about MLK, not Selma.

You wanted a movie about Selma, just as many people wanted a different story in American Sniper or Foxcatcher. What sets this movie apart IMO is the question of "Did they tell the story that they chose to tell well?" I'd answer that with a resounding yes. (A sorta for American Sniper and a no for Foxcatcher.)



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SoulHonky
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82. "Yet you prove my point with your post."
In response to Reply # 80


          

I said you wanted a movie about Selma and this was a movie about MLK.

Your response is Ella Baker.

I mean, how did you go into a movie about MLK and NOT expect the radical elements to be mostly ignored. It's like walking into a romantic-comedy and walking out complaining that they didn't talk enough about how women don't need a man to be happy.

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lfresh
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88. "."
In response to Reply # 78
Sat Jan-10-15 02:39 AM by lfresh

  

          


~~~~
When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices. Live so that when you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.
~~~~
You cannot hate people for their own good.

  

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Musa
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58. "How does Viola Luzzio get a shout out before Ture? (yt savior)"
In response to Reply # 49


  

          

Also no mention of the voting act being rendered obsolete just last year.

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Musa
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59. "How does Viola Luzzio get a shout out before Ture? (yt savior)"
In response to Reply # 49


  

          

Also no mention of the voting act being rendered obsolete just last year.

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blkprinceMD05
Member since Nov 29th 2004
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101. "How do you vehemently disagree with everything he wrote???? "
In response to Reply # 49


  

          

He basically said critical and important ppl from that moment were left out and they were....what are u vehemently disagreeing with in regards to that?

I don't think the film is excused from criticisms on the "white savior" front either (although that's not what I took from it becuz I know those parts were historically accurate)

I liked the film but for u to say u vehemently disagree with everything he wrote looks suspect as fuck....

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Frank Longo
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102. "It's a movie."
In response to Reply # 101


  

          

You can't fully represent every single person within a movement. DuVernay does an incredible job depicting as many important historical figures as she does.

I addressed every single thing I disagreed with above. If thinking the movie has no white savior, does a wonderful job representing a number of important women, and covers more historical figures than nearly any other biopic about a social movement makes me "suspect as fuck" (of being a racist, I guess?), then... okay? lol

I'm also not remotely the only person who disagrees with that poster's POV. So I guess a lot of suspect as fuck people post here.

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Laz aka Black Native
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60. "It's funny you talk about a white savior "
In response to Reply # 48


  

          

when the little flack the movie HAS been getting is due to the actuall LACK of a white savior in it

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Musa
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63. "So you didn't see the angle of northern whites joining and giving "
In response to Reply # 60


  

          

the movement in Selma some type of legitimacy in the eyes of LBJ (who was actually for voting rights but tactical in his approach.)?

The ignoring "radical" elements is hella blatant. No mention not even at the end of the movie.

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Laz aka Black Native
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68. "Naw, it was part of the press angle MLK was doing"
In response to Reply # 63


  

          

He said that if LBJ keeps getting front page articles on his desk about it and getting national attention, he would be forced to move on it.

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Musa
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70. "See this is where you need to do your research"
In response to Reply # 68


  

          

LBJ was never against the voters rights act and was looking for a opportune time to influence the situation in Selma.

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Laz aka Black Native
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71. "The movie never portrayed he was against it but that it would have to wa..."
In response to Reply # 70


  

          

MLK was stressing that it couldn't wait & so, the media push was part of the urgency that was stressed.

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josephmurf2384
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54. "Absolutely excellent"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

missed the first 10 minutes, but i was overwhelmed with how good it was.

  

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nipsey
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66. "Why It Took 50 Years To Make A Major MLK Movie (SWIPE)"
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http://deadline.com/2015/01/selma-ava-duvernay-martin-luther-king-interview-1201340457/


Hard Road To Oscar: 'Selma's Ava DuVernay On Why It Took 50 Years To Make A Major MLK Movie

By Mike Fleming Jr
Co-Editor-in-Chief, Film
January 4, 2015

How could Ava DuVernay, a former Hollywood publicist and Sundance-winning director of a movie that cost just $200,000, be the one to break the long trail of futility in mounting a major movie that conveyed how much of a galvanizing presence Dr. Martin Luther King Jr was in the battle for civil rights in America? Coming aboard Selma after the previous star package cratered under Lee Daniels, DuVernay found herself with David Oyelowo’s determinaion to play MLK, a Paul Webb script and little else. The director (who made uncredited contributions to the script) managed to navigate around formidable obstacles, not the least of which were copyrights on MLK signature speeches held by his estate. After platforming the film for Oscars, Paramount opens it wide this Friday. This interview was done before several confidantes of President Lyndon Johnson complained he has dishonestly been depicted as, at most generous, a benign force in the move to mount the historic voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. Paramount would not comment further, beyond Tweets DuVernay herself wrote, including this one: “Notion that Selma was LBJ’s idea is jaw dropping and offensive to and black citizens who made it so.” All the Oscar-bait biopics are getting dinged up on accuracy issues right now, and it remains to be seen how much of an obstacle this will prove. Here’s how she overcame all the other obstacles.


DEADLINE: Movies about iconic civil rights activists from Gandhi and Malcolm X came and went long ago. Why did it take so long for Dr. King to get his own film?

DUVERNAY: Part of me says this is when the film wanted to be made because of this cultural moment that we’re in. It means so much I think and really sparks conversation at a time when that is needed. Beyond that, I think most people were having challenges wrapping their mind around how to deal with the estate. That had a lot to do with it. But five decades’ worth of no one figuring that out is a little ridiculous. If anyone really wanted to do it, it would have been done. But for whatever reason it’s happening now and I’m glad it is.


DEADLINE: The one I thought would get there first was Paul Greengrass’s Memphis script, about MLK’s last days and how Hoover’s FBI men who haunted his every step had to track down his murderer before he left the country. Even though Universal kicked it to the curb after Andrew Young complained about the depiction of infidelity, it is a great script.

DUVERNAY: Oh, I absolutely knew Greengrass’s was going to go. But then there was that story that Paul had found this minister to play him, some electric guy who was not an actor, and between that time and when they were going to start pre-production, he died. If that guy had lived, the film would have been made by now.


DEADLINE: There are so many great backstories of adversity in this crop of fact-based films, and Selma is no different. Lee Daniels had Hugh Jackman and this great cast, and the movie craters and he goes off and directs The Butler. What was left when you stepped in?

DUVERNAY: The main thing left standing from the Lee Daniels version was David. And to say still standing is being generous; the film was not moving forward. David was asking the producers, should I be gaining weight? They felt strongly the film should be made by an African-American director and they would wait until one emerged, because at that point they had thought Spike Lee would do it. But they also needed someone who could stay within a certain budget range, which had been a problem not just with Lee but also with Spike and others.


DEADLINE: So how did you get the job?

DUVERNAY: David wrote them a passionate letter about me. We’d just worked with each other in Middle of Nowhere, and it must have come off like some random woman he had worked with on this little indie. And yeah, he pitched me. So by the time they called me, it was vague, they wanted to see if we could possibly work together, something like that.


DEADLINE: How hard did you have to sell yourself to get this gig? Much has been made of this accomplishment because you are an African American woman, but really there would have been great pressure on any filmmaker. This is not some rom-com. The first major movie about the 20th Century’s civil rights leader has to stand up for the ages.

DUVERNAY: I think my indie background helped so much because previous directors were not keen on the budget. It wasn’t going to be more than $20 million, to do all those marches and speeches and protests, and period, and tons of people. And Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., done right. I never had to pitch the project, I never had to do anything. They came to me and said do you think you can crack this, at that budget? The hero of this thing is my producing partner, Paul Barnes. He is from Atlanta, he’s done television shows for BET there. He knows those crews, he knows that tax incentive, he knows how to make stuff cheap. He made Middle of Nowhere with me and he back then hit the number. We knew we could only go to $20 million and basically he said, Ava, you have to write to this number. And I had to tailor and recalibrate the film to fit that number. It’s the opposite of how things usually work, where you bring a script and say, how much is this going to cost? I got the call in January, finished that effort around April, and we backed into that number. And with that, they had a black filmmaker who had won Sundance, they had the lead actor they really wanted, and on paper, a script we felt could meet that budget, and a producing partner who knows Atlanta. And then Oprah Winfrey came aboard, a month after I turned in the script, and it was all set about two months after that.


DEADLINE: How much changed from the script that you inherited to the one that you turned in?

DUVERNAY: I’d say about 90 percent. He had a lot of good White House zingers and I kept those. I don’t write white racist very well, and left some of those good zingers in, like, if Elvis Presley and Jesus Christ went into a club, stuff like that. What was so important to me to get right was the arc about King and Coretta, the relationship that they had, their marriage and the turmoil in it at that time. All of the strategy sessions with the Band of Brothers including all of the leaders around him. The poor little girls in the introduction, the third act turnaround. A lot. Just being African-American from East Philly, I knew the period really well. My father is from Brownstown, Alabama, so I knew the place. I took out all the composite characters. They were like three people made into one person, stuff like that. The time was so beautiful and the story was so intense, you didn’t have to make anything up.


DEADLINE: When Paul Greengrass’s script was at Universal, it stalled when MLK confidante Andrew Young complained about the depiction of infidelity…

DUVERNAY: I know he didn’t like Oliver Stone’s script. Maybe he didn’t like either. I never read anybody else’s script.


DEADLINE: I didn’t expect you to deal with that issue, because it hampered other MLK films, but you found a poignant way to do it that didn’t feel exploitative. A short conversation that says everything. My own feeling is, imperfect men can still be great men, and five decades after the fact, whatever imperfections exist don’t define those great men. What went through your mind as you crafted that scene? It was done exquisitely well.

DUVERNAY: Thank you. You know what? I think it’s just a matter of perspective in a way. We know that the rumors of infidelity have to be dealt with. We know that during the time of Selma a tape did arrive at the house. Maybe a male writer would be more interested in the woman, you know, whoever the other women were. For me as a black woman writer, I’m interested in this in the context of the marriage with a black woman. When I think about that issue, I wanted to know how it was at home and how it affected the marriage. I think it’s just one of the beautiful things about really allowing films to be made from different perspectives, where everything is not always seen from a white point of view. Get different voices in there. When I sat down to write this scene, I wondered what was it like when he came home at the moment that the tape arrived? And trying to find who they were as characters and what they might have said, knowing what their relationship was, from all my interviews and research. It wasn’t going to be very wordy; she wasn’t a yeller and she wasn’t a chair thrower. She was a very disciplined sister, and so it was just really trying to get inside of that. It came really quickly to me, it wasn’t a scene I labored over too much. When I put myself in that place and in that living room, it just started to come.


DEADLINE: We’ve discussed the problems with the MLK estate. Another was that Dr. King copyrighted his famous speeches.

DUVERNAY: Right. Our film is unsanctioned, it was made independently. So at no point was the estate consulted for notes, nor did we try to get any intellectual property. That decision was made early on and I was happy that the producers really trusted me in being able to tackle this material without permission. Filmmakers weren’t able to tell the story, the ones who had to answer to the estate for those speeches. If you wanted to tell the story that you wanted to tell, you had to be able to kind of unhinge yourself from that.


DEADLINE: How did you get around that?

DUVERNAY: I rewrote the speeches, so none of the speeches that you hear are his exact words. I went line by line, word by word and literally studied his speech pattern. David and I worked on the voice patterns and the intention of what he was saying. And literally, it was just a line by line substitute. What was the crux of what he wanted to say, how could we say the same thing in a different way? And that was the only way to do it. If you look at a film that hasn’t been made for 50 years and you try to break down why, some allowances have to be made, if you want to tell the story. We had to un-anchor ourselves from the words in order to get at them.


DEADLINE: When I watched the film, it didn’t occur to me you’d veered from the actual spoken words in the Selma speeches 50 years ago. There was power in the words. Purists would know, I guess, but most of us…

DUVERNAY: Wouldn’t be able to tell the difference. This was 1965.


DEADLINE: Many people who’ll see this film weren’t alive then. But for the ones who were there and heard the actual words, how did they respond?

DUVERNAY: Andrew Young and John Lewis, who were both there, they were incredibly kind. They allowed me to call them and ask questions and never asked to see the script. They said, just make it, just make the movie, just tell the story. Do what you have to do to tell the story. So they had no problem with the words being changed. When Andrew Young watched the movie, he said, “You knocked it out of the park. You did it, kid.” He said they’ve been waiting so long for someone to tell the story. There had been so many promises that someone would make a movie. Just the fact that it felt good to them, that meant the world to me. John Lewis, who was there on the bridge as a young man, is still a congressman in Georgia. We showed the film for Congress in DC and he was at a screening and starts to cry and says, ‘Thank you. Those are my friends up there. I remember.’


DEADLINE: You mentioned contemporary relevance to Selma. Your movie lays out the strategy that Dr. King’s marchers used, which involved peaceful protest that worked best when it provoked strong reaction from the opposition. How would those techniques work now, at a time when cameras are everywhere and there is so much anger about recent deaths at the hands of police, and not a lot of restraint?

DUVERNAY: Thanks for asking the question. The tactics that were used then would not work now, per se. I mean, really organized resistance needs to continue, but such a big part of their strategy was creating a platform for racists to act out, and then capture that violence so that the rest of America could see it on television and feel something in their conscience. When you have something like Eric Garner, his death being captured on camera and the whole world sees it and yet there’s still not an indictment, we know that Dr. King’s facts of showing the violence doesn’t work anymore. I guess we’ve been somehow desensitized to it. I’m not sure what has happened, but what he did and what we show in the film is how flexible and creative they were.


DEADLINE: What do you mean?

DUVERNAY: When one thing didn’t work, they pivoted to something else. When that didn’t work, they added on something else. When they were marching in Selma and they weren’t getting movement, they did a call to the world and said, “Hey white people, come join us.” When they did that and that didn’t work, they couldn’t get across the bridge, they took it to court. It was always moving, it was always morphing, and I think that’s what really needs to be done now. The base tactics need to mature and they need to morph and they need to grow. I mean, we’re just going to still doing the same thing over and over. And so what I really think is smart people need to come together and try to figure out what’s next, and that’s what King was always about, trying to figure out what’s next.


DEADLINE: There is a moment in the movie I was most curious about. After the first attempt to march in Selma met with violence, and galvanized whites and blacks to feel outrage and join, Dr. King is about to launch the second attempt. He takes a knee and then gets up, turns around and walks back even though it is clear the marchers were going to be allowed to pass through that line of National Guard or state troopers that dished out the beatings the first time. What do you think would have happened had he continued that march at that moment?

DUVERNAY: Well, there was question as to whether they were walking into an ambush, that the people were going to pass through those troopers and be attacked from the sides. They were going to get past the troopers and then it was going to be blocked off. I mean, it was a five-day march to Montgomery and so if it was blocked off with no cameras allowed there, those marchers would have been open prey. There were a lot of questions as to what would have happened. I don’t believe those troopers withdrew with the best interests of those black citizens in mind. I really think it was wise for a lot of reasons, to wait and to withdraw and see what would happen. There are a lot of theories about what happened and why and what would have been, but yeah, he made his choice that day. What always strikes us in the scene is, would everyone else follow that leader, today? Would everyone follow that one person to the middle of the bridge, and if that person turned around, would everyone follow that person back? I think now it’s such a people-led movement, it’s not a leader-led movement. It’s not one person that we’re following, and it’s really interesting to think about who has the power now to command a crowd to turn around and walk back. There’s no one. I mean, I don’t know if you can think of anyone, I can’t. Right now in America, to lead a march and if something happened to make them say, ‘Everyone turn around and silently, quietly go back,’ who could do it? That just really illustrates the fact that there is no one leader any more. And I don’t know if that’s a bad or a good thing, but it’s the truth.


DEADLINE: One curious thing about your film. It’s an inherently American movie, the twists and turns between the Georgia-born MLK, Texas-born President Lyndon Johnson, and Alabama-born segregationist governor George Wallace. All are played by British actors in David Oyelowo, Tom Wilkinson, and Tim Roth. Was that not at least a bit surreal?

DUVERNAY: Hey, you forgot one. Carmen Ejogo. Coretta Scott King was also played by a Brit. She’s British. The four main parts are British. Now listen, I don’t have a love affair with Brits.


DEADLINE: How did that happen?

DUVERNAY: I’m from Compton, California. I am not rooting for the Brits, okay? But they were ferocious. They were fantastic. I mean, when I thought of Tim Roth as George Wallace, I said, ‘Well then, that’s just it.’ He was perfect. And there was something that I really needed to get in the physicality of Johnson. There were great actors out there but I needed someone who would tower over David, that physicality between Johnson being so tall and just a mass of a man was really important for me to capture between the two of them. Johnson would lean in, he’d use his body to intimidate. And so Wilkinson was top of that list. And then Carmen Ejogo. She had played Coretta once before about 10 years earlier in another film, and it’s an uncanny resemblance. She’s a fine, fine actor, and so she was always in my mind. So what can I do? They’re all Brits.


DEADLINE: So you film these incredibly tense scenes, you call cut and then what? Do they drop into natural accents and discuss what is happening on the pitch back home?

DUVERNAY: No. They stayed pretty intense all the way through, their focus was insane. They were helped by the actors around them.


DEADLINE: Now what about David Oyelowo, on whose back the whole movie hinges?

DUVERNAY: Ah, David. Classically trained super posh guy, the first black actor to play a king for the Royal Shakespeare Company, Henry VI. He comes down to Atlanta to play Dr. King, and he had to be all in so he could get out of there alive basically. He did the standard stuff like gain weight and change his hairline, but that was nothing compared to what he did to get that speech pattern right. It was not a mimic, and not an impersonation. He gave you a feeling of authenticity. There is a lot of great work he did to get there, I hope people really see it.


DEADLINE: Dr. King’s oratorical skills were unsurpassed. How long did it take for David to find his voice?

DUVERNAY: David had been living with the part for about three years before I came on board, and when I got there we brought on a dialect coach for him, and started breaking down his speech pattern. And the key was we didn’t ever want to mimic; it was all about just getting close but not too close. And there were times where he was getting very close, doing it really spot on, and we actually pulled that back because I think you start to get into an impersonation. David was fantastic in really being able to find the sweet spot. What helped is he stayed in that vocal space, so even when we weren’t shooting he was always speaking as King. And then so we didn’t have to address him as Dr. King or anything, but he was him, constantly, even around his family, at the craft services table, in the trailer, always King. Once he got in that pocket and just became his voice for three months, he was able to kind of ride it from there in a really natural way. His theater background, his classical training really helped. Once we got the voice down, I never worried. Whether it was an intimate moment with Coretta in their kitchen, or on the pulpit, once he had the voice delivery down, that was it. David basically put the movie together. He brings on a director, he pitches the existing producers on the new director, brings in another high-powered producer in Oprah Winfrey. He really is the rainmaker in all this. This a town where it’s so much about waiting for permission and when I think about how he created this role for himself and it all was going to go away, and all the things he did to make sure it didn’t, it’s really remarkable.


DEADLINE: Much has been made of the strides made here by an African American female director. As that person, what obstacle did you overcome that made you proud?

DUVERNAY: For me, it was the jump. My last film was two hundred thousand dollars; this is a 20 million dollar film. Now, in the studio world, that’s nothing, but moving from that very indie world to this was fantastic, because it just really enlarged my imagination. I think there’s something about making a small film that’s beautiful. I never had a desire to make a bigger film and I thought if I could just make a small one a year and be the black Lynn Shelton, I’d be happy. But this has really opened things up to the possibilities of telling more intimate and ambitious stories. So often, independent films are people talking in a room. To get past that and be more imaginative in terms of what we can do as women filmmakers and independent filmmakers. It’s not really based on money, it’s more about allowing our imaginations to move outside these rooms that we put ourselves in when we don’t have money. Just to have been given the tools and the opportunity to sit and write and to really just roam in your mind, and to be able to actually execute here, that was just such a gift as an artist that a lot of people don’t get. This was an amazing, amazing experience. I don’t know what I’ll make next, but I know I’m forever changed by making this.


DEADLINE: You’ve said that after your Sundance success, the phone didn’t ring. How about now?

DUVERNAY: Oh, yeah. Big time. Some of my male counterparts were able to make the jump from indie faster, but I believe everything happens at a time, just as part of me believes there’s a reason why this film wasn’t made for 50 years. Look at this cultural moment that we’re in, all this unrest happening and for this film to drop right now and how it gets the conversation going. It’s the same for me. For whatever reason, it didn’t happen after Sundance, but it’s happening for me now and I am so happy.

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SoWhat
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69. "i liked it."
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it's good but not great. but good.

fuck you.

  

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lfresh
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72. "get em Frank"
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i cant do another post like this
yall are just too much
and not my Ava
i'll cut someone dammit
~~~~
When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices. Live so that when you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.
~~~~
You cannot hate people for their own good.

  

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astralblak
Member since Apr 05th 2007
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85. "ain't no one in here but one fool sis"
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we know his MO

if heads can't get behind my boo Ava, then shit, fuck 'em

we got our Ws in The Dear White People Thread

  

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lfresh
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89. "*salutes*"
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Lemme edit
He isn't worth the time
~~~~
When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices. Live so that when you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.
~~~~
You cannot hate people for their own good.

  

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Musa
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94. "I see a bunch of fools making excuses for throwing "
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shade on a movement to comfort the sensibilities of racist whites and comfortable negros.

It is in excusable that those elements were totally omitted when they were vital in the shift of the Civil Rights movement for the next 8 to 10 years. Non violence as a motto was killed in Selma more so than even with the assassination of King.

Context is everything tho but those are just minor little major details niggas miss out on.

I'mma let yall cook tho.

<----

Soundcloud.com/aquil84

(HIP HOP)
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ZooTown74
Member since May 29th 2002
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74. ""I wasn't interested in making a white-savior movie..." (swipe)"
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http://www.rollingstone.com/movies/features/ava-duvernay-on-making-selma-20150105

>We Shall Overcome: Ava DuVernay on Making 'Selma'

The groundbreaking director talks about downplaying LBJ, honoring MLK's legacy and why you should always have Oprah on your film sets

BY GAVIN EDWARDS | January 5, 2015

As a filmmaker, you put the film out there, and you just want it to be okay," says director Ava DuVernay. "You don't want to let people down; you don't want to embarrass yourself." She's done much better than that with Selma, a dramatization of the 1965 protests in Alabama led by Martin Luther King, Jr.; the movie, considered to be a leading Oscar contender, has already received four Golden Globe nominations. Peter Travers said in his rave review in Rolling Stone that DuVernay "blows the dust off history to find its beating heart."

DuVernay, 42 years old, grew up in Compton, but spent summers in Alabama. A film publicist before she shifted careers to directing, she had actually signed up to do publicity for an earlier version of Selma. The screenplay had bounced around for over five years, attached to directors such as Lee Daniels. "It was looked at as an unmakeable movie," says executive producer Paul Garnes. But British actor David Oyelowo — who had appeared in DuVernay's Sundance award-winner Middle of Nowhere — very much wanted to play King, and unbeknownst to DuVernay, was lobbying for her with an international team of producers. Despite a resumé that was limited to two microbudget features, a half-dozen documentaries, and an episode of Scandal, she got the job, and a $20 million budget.

Our conversation with DuVernay in a vegan Mexican restaurant in Hollywood happened three days before Joseph A. Califano, Jr., a former Lyndon B. Johnson aide, wrote a Washington Post op-ed complaining not only that Selma gave Johnson (played by Tom Wilkinson) short shrift, but that the president had come up with the idea for the protests himself. As it happens, earlier versions of the script focused on the relationship between King and the commander-in-chief, and how their joint efforts led to passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. She discussed why she had chosen to place less emphasis on Johnson, her casting philosophy and why it helps to have Oprah on your film set.

RS: Let's talk about reducing LBJ's role in the events you depict in the film.

AD: Every filmmaker imbues a movie with their own point of view. The script was the LBJ/King thing, but originally, it was much more slanted to Johnson. I wasn't interested in making a white-savior movie; I was interested in making a movie centered on the people of Selma. You have to bring in some context for what it was like to live in the racial terrorism that was going on in the deep south at that time. The four little girls have to be there, and then you have to bring in the women. So I started adding women.

This is a dramatization of the events. But what's important for me as a student of this time in history is to not deify what the president did. Johnson has been hailed as a hero of that time, and he was, but we're talking about a reluctant hero. He was cajoled and pushed, he was protective of a legacy — he was not doing things out of the goodness of his heart. Does it make it any worse or any better? I don't think so. History is history and he did do it eventually. But there was some process to it that was important to show.


RS: Many presidents couldn't have done it.

AD: Absolutely. Or wouldn't have even if they could.


RS: I thought Tim Roth's performance as George Wallace was very nuanced, when it would have been easy to play him as Snidely Whiplash.

AD: I wanted to try to make everyone as human as possible. That trap that I see so many non-black filmmakers do with black characters, where everything is surface and stereotypical...I didn't want to be the black filmmaker that does that with the white characters. Tim has talked about every actor has to love the character that they're playing in some way, and in the time that we're talking about, there's not a lot to love in Wallace if you believe in justice and dignity. But he found a videotape or an article of his son talking about him, and so he was able to tap into the father doing what he thought was right.

Whether it was Roth or Tom Wilkinson — or Giovanni Ribisi, Stephen Root and Alessandro Nivola — all these characters represented a real diversity of thought about this issue from the white perspective, from the dominant culture. I wanted to create an array of folks who all thought about it in a different way because white thought wasn't a monolith at that time, just as black thought wasn't a monolith.


RS: What was your philosophy when you were casting?

AD: To work with people who fascinate me. Oprah being in the cast allowed me to have flexibility because she is such a big name. Her fame and her power created space for me to be able to hire Stephan James, a 19-year-old from Canada, for John Lewis instead of the hot young guy who was just in The Fast and the Furious, or whatever. I was able to pick and choose cool people.


RS: What was it like having Oprah on the set?

AD: Her first day of shooting was the day that Maya Angelou died. I had just driven up to the set in Marietta when I got a call on my cell phone from Andrew Young, the real Andrew Young: "Sister Maya has passed on." And all I could think of was Oprah was on her way to the set. I immediately called her and said don't come, we'll do it another day. Tight schedule, a 32-day shoot, not a lot of room to move things around — but we'll figure it out. She said, "No, I can do this, it's okay." She had the same trailer as everyone else. I spoke with her briefly, and I should've stayed, but I had to go out back to the set: I had 200 extras out there. So I called Tyler Perry, he sneaked onto the set, they had their moment, and she came out ready to go. I'm grateful to him; most people see us as very different filmmakers, but in that moment we were united around Oprah.


RS: How did your old job as a publicist prepare you to do this?

AD: To make a film?


RS: As opposed to eating guacamole, yes.

AD: (Laughs) Just being able to talk to people. I used to coordinate and develop and execute really big campaigns for studios with a lot of moving parts. But the main thing is just articulating what's in your head, which we overestimate that people can do — how do you get that out in a way that's clear and un-muddled with the intention of producing a result?


RS: What was the hardest scene to shoot, emotionally?

AD: When Jimmy Lee Jackson was murdered in the cafe. At that time there was no Mike Brown murder, there was no Eric Garner murder — but there were so many others that are just ambient. It's part of the atmosphere as a black person growing up in this country: You know that's it's happening somewhere on that very day. And a month later Mike Brown was killed. (Cinematographer) Bradford Young, (editor) Spencer Averick, and I, we designed that scene in a really specific way. It was really important that we have all that stuff worked out in advance because I knew it was going to be a rough, emotional day. This wasn't a day for improvisation.


RS: King's tactics imply that his supporters are going to have to get hurt: Nonviolence doesn't work unless the other side overreacts.

AD: Being passive doesn't mean sitting there and getting hit for the sake of getting hit. And it wasn't all faith-based, either. There were some very practical reasons why it was used. You talk to most people about King now and they only know "I Have a Dream," and that he believed in peace and then he died. Really? That's what he's been reduced to? And we've allowed it to happen. And if there is anything that Selma does, it reinvigorates the narrative around him to be more full-bodied and more truthful about what his tactics were.


RS: Are you religious yourself?

AD: No, not religious. But I love God.


RS: Can you talk about the aesthetics of violence of Selma? When the church blows up and kills those four little girls, it's harrowing, but it's also filmed in a beautiful way. How do those two things work together?

AD: I don't know if my intention was to make it beautiful. How do you film four little girls being blown apart? There's a way to do it with a certain reverence and respect for who they were. That's why it was important for me that you hear their voices before it happens.


RS: There's a sinking feeling in that scene — I counted five little girls, so I was hoping maybe it wasn't going to happen.

AD: There were five girls and one lived. And I put in a boy, to misdirect you on purpose. The violence throughout the film follows the same pattern. I resisted the idea of just it being a physical blow. That spectacle has been done: All we do in this industry is blow people up. But how does the hit feel and what does the face do after? What happens to that broken body and what happens to the people that have to tend to that broken body? It's important to have the morgue scene after Jimmie Lee Jackson's death, to show the mother and slow down on her face, to slow down the girls, to slow down Annie Lee Cooper when the men put their hands on her and take her down. It was about having a reverence for that was the idea behind it instead of, say, making it beautiful. You're saying: This is worth taking a closer look at. Everybody stop and pay your respects to this.


RS: Can you pinpoint a moment of joy that happened while you were making this movie?

AD: So many things come to mind, but there was a day that we were filming in Richie Jean Jackson's house, doing that scene when they all walk into the kitchen. We're at this house in Atlanta, we had shut down the street. That was the day that Tim Roth and Giovanni Ribisi were coming for their hair and makeup tests. They have to come to see me, 'cause I can't get away. So they come to the set, and I thought, "Look at all my guys, they're all together — the White House guys, Wallace, the black guys." Those characters never cross, right? The chance to see them all together was so fun. Then a black SUV starts coming up the street, going around cones. Our assistant directors and our production assistants are running down, saying, don't go, they're shooting. The door opens and out comes Oprah. She's not supposed to be there; we thought she wasn't even in the state that day! She starts walking towards me and I just run up to her and give her a big old hug. It was like a house party in the street.


RS: How was it having people like the actual Andrew Young on the set?

AD: So cool. And it easily could not have been if they were grouchy curmudgeons. But there's still a spark about them. These are our greatest minds, our greatest radicals. Time has not done them in. If you look John Lewis in the eye and he's talkin' to you about something, you're like "Uh huh, let's go do it!" When I sat down with them, I was really clear that we weren't asking for anybody's permission.

But this (film) is not called "King"; this is Selma. This was as much the story about the band of brothers and sisters that were around him as it was King's story. There haven't been great pains taken to show that he was a leader among leaders — all of them could've probably done it. Why him? He could talk the best. He was an orator who was able to synthesize all these ideas in a way that spoke to the masses and also that spoke to people in power. But they were there and they were the masterminds behind it. I tried to show the strategy, the tactics, the arguments. That's how history is made, not by consensus, but by people freakin' battling it out, right? That's how change happens.

________________________________________________________________________________
Your typing ain't as "incendiary" as you think it is.

  

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lfresh
Member since Jun 18th 2002
92693 posts
Thu Jan-08-15 12:07 PM

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76. "Ava was on Charlie Rose last night"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://www.businessweek.com/videos/2015-01-08/selma-charlie-rose-01-08


~~~~
When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices. Live so that when you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.
~~~~
You cannot hate people for their own good.

  

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astralblak
Member since Apr 05th 2007
20029 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 12:37 PM

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86. "really cool that David pushed for Ava to direct"
In response to Reply # 76


  

          

.

  

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lfresh
Member since Jun 18th 2002
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Tue Jan-13-15 10:43 AM

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97. "brought her to that next level"
In response to Reply # 86


  

          

awesome
~~~~
When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices. Live so that when you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.
~~~~
You cannot hate people for their own good.

  

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
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Sat Jan-10-15 11:54 PM

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90. "Avo on The Daily Show"
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http://thedailyshow.cc.com/videos/gd45e9/exclusive---ava-duvernay-extended-interview

  

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Tony Sparks
Member since Nov 20th 2007
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Sat Jan-10-15 11:56 PM

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91. "Ava on The Reid Report"
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http://www.msnbc.com/the-reid-report/watch/powerful-selma-lauded-by-critics-376545859576

  

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bucknchange
Member since May 07th 2003
3590 posts
Sun Jan-11-15 11:58 AM

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92. "RE: so no Ella Baker or Stokely Carmichael in this? "
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Musa
Member since Mar 08th 2006
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Mon Jan-12-15 12:08 PM

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95. "How convenient"
In response to Reply # 92


  

          

.

<----

Soundcloud.com/aquil84

(HIP HOP)
http://aquil.bandcamp.com

  

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ternary_star
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Sun Jan-11-15 07:28 PM

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93. "cookie cutter"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

(SPOILERS)

I've heard a few different people, on different occasions, say they feel bad for not voting after watching this, so that far transcends any critique of the filmmaking and would be exactly what MLK would hope for.

But having said that, as a movie, this is pretty straight-down-the-middle biopic. It checks all the boxes of an historical period drama and ends up just feeling sterile and generic. The horrible Malcolm X cameo just serves as a reminder of how bloodless and personality-free this film is in comparison to Spike's X biopic.

The only moment that rang true was the scene at the morgue with the grandfather of the slain protestor. That was, by far, the best performance in the movie. He wasn't fumbling with a terrible southern accent or portraying some super-human archetype or reciting stilted, unbelievable dialogue. That was an 80-year-old black man who's been through some shit and speaking from his heart.

As always, the southern accents were pretty horrendous throughout. Not sure why we always have to fill southern roles with british actors, but it's almost unanimously terrible and distracting. Love me some Tom Wilkinson, but on several occasions, his accent drifted from northern American to British lilt to cartoon Texan in the same sentence. He never sounded like Lyndon Johnson. And why the hell is Oprah in this movie? Or Giovanni Ribisi in a Tyler Perry-quality hairpiece? Unnecessary and distracting.

And that brings me to probably the worst part of the film - Olewoyo's King. I guess it was a creative choice on his part to not event attempt to sound like MLK, but to ignore one of King's most powerful weapons - his booming, lyrical/musical speech patterns - is not only distracting, it kills the power of the (numerous) public speaking scenes. I get that it could have very easily become a bad parody, but portraying one of the most powerful public speakers of all time requires that you at least attempt to nail his speaking voice.

Again, nothing wrong with the movie, but aside from the opening bombing scene, there's no personal touch to this thing...no artistic flag in the ground...nothing that kept me thinking about it after I left the theater.


  

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Deebot
Member since Oct 21st 2004
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Mon Jan-12-15 09:33 PM

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96. "This movie is 10 or 11 times better than Boyhood"
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Excellent job rewriting the speeches, I still felt the power.

Loved the writing of all the strategical debates in King's camp.

Excellent job depicting the weight that King and the others were carrying in their heart at the time.

The filming of the bridge carnage in that white gas haze over the reporter's recording and the reaction shots of citizens watching on TV was just fucking masterfully done.

Glad they didn't ruin the movie by trying to film the assassination. I knew they were smart enough not to but there's always that fear.

Definitely in my top 5 for the year, need a digestive period to know exactly where I stand though. I just saw Wild and Selma over the course of 3 days so my head is spinning with all the awesomeness.

  

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Kid Ray
Member since Sep 23rd 2010
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Thu Jan-22-15 06:33 PM

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103. "Amen. Sad that Boyhood gonna take all the awards smh."
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Selma is the better film by a landslide, better acting, direction, score. I almost broke down during it.

  

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bignick
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98. ""OKP hates black movies." (c) Idiots"
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SankofaII
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Fri Jan-16-15 12:44 PM

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99. "Love him or Hate him, Spike Lee *STAYS* telling the truth:"
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http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/01/15/spike-lee-blasts-selma-oscar-snubs-you-know-what-f-ck-em.html?source=TDB&via=FB_Page

Spike Lee Blasts ‘Selma’ Oscar Snubs: ‘You Know What? F*ck ’Em’
On the day the Oscar nominations were announced, The Daily Beast hung out with Spike Lee at his Brooklyn office to discuss awards politics and how Selma was overlooked.

A few hours after the nominations for the 87th Academy Awards were announced, I took a pre-planned trip to the Brooklyn office of Spike Lee to profile the Oscar-nominated filmmaker for his latest Kickstarter-funded movie, Da Sweet Blood of Jesus, which is now available online on Vimeo on Demand and will be released theatrically February 13.

The coincidence wasn’t lost on either of us. Lee’s films have been on the receiving end of several egregious Academy snubs, from his 1989 classic Do the Right Thing failing to receive a Best Picture nod—the racially problematic Driving Miss Daisy ended up winning that year—to Lee not receiving any nominations for his ambitious biopic Malcolm X, though it later landed on both Roger Ebert’s and Martin Scorsese’s lists of the best movies of the ’90s.

As they say, the more things change, the more they stay the same. The biggest Oscar news Thursday was that the powerful Martin Luther King Jr. biopic Selma managed nominations only for Best Picture and Best Song while being snubbed in all the other major categories, most notably Best Director (Ava DuVernay) and Best Actor (David Oyelowo). Lee, who said Selma and Birdman were the two best films he saw last year, seemed annoyed but not surprised.

“If I saw Ava today I’d say, ‘You know what? Fuck ’em. You made a very good film, so feel good about that and start working on the next one.’”
“Join the club!” Lee chuckled, before getting serious. “But that doesn’t diminish the film. Nobody’s talking about motherfuckin’ Driving Miss Daisy. That film is not being taught in film schools all across the world like Do the Right Thing is. Nobody’s discussing Driving Miss Motherfuckin’ Daisy. So if I saw Ava today I’d say, ‘You know what? Fuck ’em. You made a very good film, so feel good about that and start working on the next one.”

But it wasn’t just Selma. This year’s Oscars is the whitest since 1998, with no person of color receiving an acting nomination. It’s a far cry from last year, when 12 Years a Slave took home Best Picture, Lupita Nyong’o won Best Supporting Actress, and Steve McQueen, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and Barkhad Abdi garnered nods for Best Director, Best Actor, and Best Supporting Actor, respectively.

“Anyone who thinks this year was gonna be like last year is retarded,” said Lee. “There were a lot of black folks up there with 12 Years a Slave, Steve , Lupita , Pharrell. It’s in cycles of every 10 years. Once every 10 years or so I get calls from journalists about how people are finally accepting black films. Before last year, it was the year with Halle Berry, Denzel , and Sidney Poitier. It’s a 10-year cycle. So I don’t start doing backflips when it happens.”

One of the major problems, according to Lee, is the composition of the Academy voting body, which is 94 percent white and an average of 63 years old. In other words, it’s a different generation of people and thinking, which could explain why most Oscar-winning characters portrayed by African-Americans are subservient—from the slave (12 Years a Slave) to the maid (The Help).

“Let’s be honest. I know they’re trying to become more diverse, but when you look at the Academy and Do the Right Thing or Driving Miss Daisy, are they going to choose a film where you have the relatively passive black servant, or are they going to choose a film with a menacing ‘Radio Raheem?’” asked Lee. “A lot of times, people are going to vote for what they’re comfortable with, and anything that’s threatening to them they won’t.”

But Lee, who also expressed shock that the Roger Ebert documentary Life Itself failed to be recognized, said he was optimistic about the Academy’s trajectory under Cheryl Boone Isaacs, the first black president in Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences history.

“The Academy is trying to be more diverse,” he said. “Cheryl is trying to open it up and have more diversity amongst the members of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. But with Selma, it’s not the first time it’s happened, and every time it does I say, ‘You can’t go to awards like the Oscars or the Grammys for validation. The validation is if your work still stands 25 years later.’”

This interview is a portion of a forthcoming profile of Spike Lee in The Daily Beast.

Get Out the Room
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/get-out-the-room/id525657893

Some of y'all need this in your life: http://www.psychology.com

  

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The Analyst
Member since Sep 22nd 2007
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Sat Jan-17-15 08:27 AM

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100. "RE: Love him or Hate him, Spike Lee *STAYS* telling the truth:"
In response to Reply # 99


  

          

>"...it’s not the first time it’s
>happened, and every time it does I say, ‘You can’t go to
>awards like the Oscars or the Grammys for validation. The
>validation is if your work still stands 25 years later.’”

This is the absolute truth right here. History has pretty much proven that a film's performance at the Oscars has almost nothing to do with how it's remembered. DTRT is a perfect example. (Also: Kubrick, Welles, Hitchcock, Hawkes, Altman, Lumet are just some of the legendary directors who never won an Oscar for directing.) At the end of the day, SELMA is a good ass movie that people will remember, and DuVernay has proven her talent, so I believe she's gonna have much success down the road.

----

  

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Castro
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Fri Jan-30-15 08:13 PM

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104. "Bradford Young!!! That shot of the Pettus bridge that tilts to the marc..."
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Then the scenes where he shoots Brown skin folks correctly...just amazing work.

------------------
One Hundred.

  

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xangeluvr
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Fri Jan-30-15 11:25 PM

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105. "great movie."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

absolutely loved it. trying to spread the good word about it as much as possible.

GamerTag and PSN: PokeEmAll

  

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Kahlema
Member since Jan 31st 2003
16850 posts
Tue Feb-03-15 04:26 PM

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106. "A great movie."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

This movie deserves more recognition and awards than it's got. Superb acting, well written and good cinematography. Very powerful and moving. More stimulating than Boyhood was, and had WAY more purpose.

-------
peace and love

that's when i tiptoed out ur inbox (c) ricky

http://instagram.com/kahlema
http://twitter.com/jazzlema

  

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will_5198
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Tue Feb-10-15 05:09 PM

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107. "a reminder what it is to be a decent human being."
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painfully amazing how the George Wallace rhetoric ("liberals are trying to change the American way of life!") and unprovoked police murder could be on the news tonight, in the same exact fashion.

--------

  

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astralblak
Member since Apr 05th 2007
20029 posts
Thu Mar-05-15 01:59 AM

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108. "It was a great movie. i think it was 2014's best honestly"
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.

  

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13Rose
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Fri Mar-06-15 03:02 PM

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109. "Very strong movie"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I loved the depiction of Black folk in this film. All of the major players felt like family. Hell they made MLK seem like a distant family member. Made him human. The only thing I didn't like was the song Glory. The song is fine enough until Common starts rapping. His voice just takes me out of the movie. I don't like his choice of flow on the record. That said, I'm happy he's made it this far to win an Oscar.

This post was paid for by the following.

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b.Touch
Member since Jun 28th 2011
20514 posts
Thu May-07-15 06:49 AM

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110. "Finally saw it via YouTube Rental"
In response to Reply # 0
Thu May-07-15 07:05 AM by b.Touch

  

          

January through April was impenetrably busy for me.

But maybe seeing this not-in-public was better, because I bawled.

The movie starts out slow and also a little suddenly, almost as if it's a sequel to a King film about the Civil RIghts Act and the March on Washington. But once it gets going, it gets going.

A great film, but I'm lowkey mad at Ava DuVernay for just how chilling she made the murders of the four little girls in the church and Jimmie Lee Jackson, t the literal and figurative extents of what is permissible in PG-13 rated films.

Also, the "Birth of a Nation" references all up and through the "Bloody Sunday" sequence...

  

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obsidianchrysalis
Member since Jan 29th 2003
7500 posts
Sat Jun-27-15 11:48 AM

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112. "Rented this via Netflix the other day"
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An amazing film, both technically as far as the editing, cinematography, and wardrobe are concerned, but also more importantly, artistically.

I think the aspect that seperated this movie from most biopics is the focus on the supporting actors. All of the supporting characters, except for the government officials were given some sort of emotional backstory or a chance to reveal their strength or lackthereof.
The scenes with Martin and Coretta were really well done. It not only made the movie more emotionally resonate, but made King more human.


As strong as the sense of tone and pacing was, her ability as a writer whether it was reworking the speeches with Dr. king or beefing up the characters or the little touch of the conversation of the 'Four little girls', they all humanized what is an iconic moment of the civil rights movement.

It would have been nice for Duvernay to have been recognized for her work. I feel kind of sexist saying this, but I don't think a male director would have made a film this personally rewarding. Most biopics are about the subject and their ability to shape their world or movement, but this movie was about the relationships and people which made Martin. It was less about Selma and the history he created and more about him, his heroism, reluctance and his weakness.

Even 'X' was more about the history of Malcolm and his politics and less about the man and his relationships which made him X.

She seemed to be a perfect director for this project. Daniels' movie would have been endearing but also messy enough to take away from the sense of King's elegance. And I don't think any of the other directors would have gotten the tone right either.

I won't get too deep into this because Frank and Musa got into the debate with the truth of LBJ's and Dr. King's relationship versus the facts of that relationship.

I read some of the criticisms of the relationship Dr. King had to MLK. It is striking that Andrew Young's view of history did not match the sense Duvernay took. Obviously, biopics take liberties with the facts of the lives of their aubjects to get at their truth. But I thought King and LBJ had a relationship which could have appeared contentious at times.

Like Frank and others said, it's unfortunately hard to reconcile the notion that 50 years after Selma that the battle for civil and human rights being granted to members of the Black community is an ongoing one. Adding a note at the end about the Supreme Court rolling back some of the gains made by the Voting Rights Act might have been timely, but may have taken away from the movie working as a document of the history of the Selma and the movement.

  

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