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Subject: "Jazz-ish releases - 2024" Previous topic | Next topic
thebigfunk
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Sat Mar-09-24 01:09 PM

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"Jazz-ish releases - 2024"


          

Probably won't be consistent with it, but there's some great stuff out there already... so let's throw up a post.

-thebigfunk

~ i could still snort you under the table ~

  

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Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
joel ross - nublues
Mar 09th 2024
1
jahari massamba unit - yhwh is love
Mar 09th 2024
2
mary halvorson - cloudward
Mar 09th 2024
3
Iyer/Oh/Sorey - Compassion
Mar 09th 2024
4
Otis Sandsjo/Petter Eldh/Dan Nichols - Y-Otis Tre
Mar 09th 2024
5
Alice Coltrane - The Carnegie Hall Concert
Mar 24th 2024
6
RE: Alice Coltrane - The Carnegie Hall Concert
Mar 26th 2024
9
'Echologia' by PS5
Mar 24th 2024
7
RE: 'Echologia' by PS5
Mar 26th 2024
10
'Harlem to Havana' by New Jazz Underground
Mar 24th 2024
8
'City Swamp' by Jake Long
Apr 09th 2024
11
will keep a look out. thanks
Apr 13th 2024
17
josh johnson - unusual objects
Apr 10th 2024
12
and if you want another recent solo sax record...
Apr 10th 2024
13
RE: josh johnson - unusual objects
Apr 11th 2024
15
Ches Smith - Laugh Ash
Apr 10th 2024
14
RE: Ches Smith - Laugh Ash
Apr 11th 2024
16

thebigfunk
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1. "joel ross - nublues"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Ross made one of my favorite records of the last few years, "Parable of the Poet," and so am happy this has more than lived up to that standard.

My favorite cut so far is easily the long, suite-like "mellowdee":
https://youtu.be/IACfxJBf_AY

The whole band shines here, but Immanuel Wilkins on sax is both immediately identifiable and absolutely kills it. (What a roaring roster for Blue Note these days)

Three standards/covers, the rest originals.

-thebigfunk

~ i could still snort you under the table ~

  

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thebigfunk
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Sat Mar-09-24 01:17 PM

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2. "jahari massamba unit - yhwh is love"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Madlib and Riggins are back.

https://jaharimassambaunit.bandcamp.com/album/yhwh-is-love

All around this is maybe a chiller, more explicitly beat-oriented outing than their first record together a few years ago. Only just digging into this one but will get a lot of spin, easy.

Massamba Afundance:
https://youtu.be/Ks1jc3oO5tI

-thebigfunk

~ i could still snort you under the table ~

  

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thebigfunk
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Sat Mar-09-24 01:29 PM

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3. "mary halvorson - cloudward"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Haven't given this one enough time yet - a few listens, but mostly at a distance. But can she do wrong at this point?

Seems like a nice mix of more approachable tunes and some of the more "out there" stuff she gets into, so maybe building off the pair of records from 2022 in that sense?

Terrific line-up, same as Amaryllis... and the second vibraphone-bearing record on the list, lol

Guitar : Mary Halvorson
Bass : Nick Dunston
Drums : Tomas Fujiwara
Trombone : Jacob Garchik
Trumpet : Adam O'Farrill
Vibraphone : Patricia Brennan

Sometimes that accessible/avant mix is right in the same track... here, on "The Tower," a bit of wonky pointillism opens the tune but yields to something more lilting, floating, a bit ballad-like... only to shift back into a bit of free/noise at the end:
https://youtu.be/qBUOxfcxNeU


-thebigfunk

~ i could still snort you under the table ~

  

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thebigfunk
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Sat Mar-09-24 01:41 PM

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4. "Iyer/Oh/Sorey - Compassion"
In response to Reply # 0


          

https://ecmrecords.com/product/compassion-vijay-iyer-linda-may-han-oh-tyshawn-sorey/

Follow-up to 2021's "Uneasy," the trio's magic persists here... BUT

I'll confess to thinking this feels long on the first few listens, as did the earlier record. It's not even a matter of length so much as diversity? Maybe my opinion will change. I wouldn't cut anything from either record on quality alone... but by the end of either album, I'm getting antsy.

Still, no real complaints here and will get tons of spin going forward.

Would link their take on Geri Allen's "Free Spirits/Drummer's Song" here but can't find a good link. So check it out via streaming...

-thebigfunk

~ i could still snort you under the table ~

  

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thebigfunk
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Sat Mar-09-24 01:53 PM

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5. "Otis Sandsjo/Petter Eldh/Dan Nichols - Y-Otis Tre"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Last share for the day, though I've got a number more I'll try to come back to link up.

https://wejazzrecords.bandcamp.com/album/y-otis-tre

Out on the Finnish We Jazz label - which is one to watch for good contemporary jazz-ish stuff - this is very much on the same vein as Sandsjo and Eldh's Koma Saxo stuff.

They have some hip hop/beat-inspired leanings. But, I think I've said this before, but whereas I'm tired of the Dilla influence in other jazz-ish spaces, these folks play with the drag-and-pull, weirdly quantized feel of Dilla beats at times, but to super fresh results.

See for instance: "orkaneon"
https://youtu.be/LWHHRfkU9qk

It's impossible to get bored with their records and this one's no exception -- it can be serious, it can be light and weird, but it's always interesting and fun in one way or another.




-thebigfunk

~ i could still snort you under the table ~

  

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A Love Supreme
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Sun Mar-24-24 02:05 AM

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6. "Alice Coltrane - The Carnegie Hall Concert"
In response to Reply # 0


          

https://tidal.com/browse/album/351125322

  

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A Love Supreme
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9. "RE: Alice Coltrane - The Carnegie Hall Concert"
In response to Reply # 6


          

https://aquariumdrunkard.com/2024/03/21/alice-coltrane-the-carnegie-hall-concert/

The Carnegie Hall Concert : Aquarium Drunkard

Had The Carnegie Hall Concert been released in 1971 when it was originally commissioned and recorded by Impulse as a double live LP, it would undoubtedly rank among the all-time holy grails of live jazz, no, live music, period.

By Justin Gage

Had The Carnegie Hall Concert been released in 1971 when it was originally commissioned and recorded by Impulse as a double live LP, it would undoubtedly rank among the all-time holy grails of live jazz, no, live music, period. But nothing happens before it’s time, and we are unbelievably fortunate to be graced with the revelation of Coltrane’s performance in the here and now. Left in the vault for decades and only partially bootlegged, The Carnegie Hall Concert documents Alice Coltrane cresting a creative peak which marked the end of a cycle of suffering and a rebirth for her spirit and music. This is more than a live recording, it’s a transfiguration through sound.

By 1971, Alice Coltrane had passed through a crucible of grief and turmoil following the untimely deaths of her husband, John Coltrane, in 1967, and her older half-brother, bassist Ernie Farrow (known for his work with Yusef Lateef) two years later. Suddenly a single mother of four, she threw herself into raising her children and managing the Coltrane estate, tempering grief by recording her first albums as a composer and bandleader, A Monastic Trio (1968), Huntington Ashram Monastery (1969), and Ptah, the El Daoud (1970). Coltrane also deepened the austerity of her own spiritual practices, pushing herself to the limits of mind and body; she would sit for marathon 20 hour meditation sessions, inflict burns on herself that required hospitalization, all the while hallucinating voices from the trees. Following a near-death experience, Coltrane recalled to an interviewer, “I found that whatever questions that I might have had in my mind concerning whatever events in the future or past were answered. I think that it gave me freedom, that it gave me my true independence. The world cannot claim me anymore.”

It was around this time Coltrane first encountered Swami Satchidananda, the yoga guru who delivered the inaugural blessing at Woodstock. From 1970-1972, Coltrane dedicated herself to Satchidananda as both student and benefactor, recording a series of landmark albums informed by her new guru’s counsel. In late 1970 she spent five weeks with Satchidananda in India and Sri Lanka, a trip she credited with motivating her to explore new sonic realms within her music, later telling Essence, “The trip to the East gave me the spiritual motivation to come out more — to do more with my music.”

But that’s not necessarily what the audience was expecting when they ushered into Carnegie Hall on a cold February evening for a benefit supporting the Satchidananda’s Integral Yoga Institute. Sandwiched between sets by fellow Satchidananda devotees Laura Nyro and The Rascals (both of whom Coltrane had played session for), Alice took the stage with a double quartet rolling deep with heavy company: Pharoah Sanders and Archie Shepp on saxophone, Cecil McBee and Jimmy Garrison on bass, Clifford Jarvis and Ed Blackwell on drums, all augmented by Satchidananda followers on tamboura and harmonium. What followed was one of the most transcendent sets to ever grace the venue.

Winding tendrils of bass unfurl amid a gentle ripple of percussion, slowly winding themselves into the mighty central riff of “Journey in Satchidananda,” Coltrane’s tribute to her guru and the title cut of her watershed album released just a week prior to the gig. McBee and Garrison settle the mantra-like ostinato around the fluttering swing of Jarvis and Blackwell before cascades of arpeggio from Coltrane’s harp instate a shimmering astral bloom while warm currents of flute and sax begin wending their way through the serpentine groove. It’s a subtle and sublime rendering, a testament to Coltrane’s ability as a bandleader to coax delicate restraint from players known primarily for high-energy wailing. Continuing in this mode with another composition from Journey In Satchidnanda, “Shiva Loka” is a river of pure spectral ambience, a Vedic devotional fantasia conjuring dream scenes from the banks of the Ganges, embodying what Coltrane called “the essence of the East,” which she’d encountered during her travels with Satchidananda. Together, the pieces from Journey In Satchidananda serve as a humble offering, a benediction, a shared spiritual breath between group and audience as intimate as a prayer.

Once the offering has been made, however, we’re jolted from the meditative hush as Alice moves to piano and plunges into a full-on fire sermon, with two incendiary extended readings from John Coltrane’s songbook, “Africa” and “Leo.” With these pieces, Alice raises the spirit of her late husband, communing with his presence through sound. “The feeling that I get from playing his music is sort of a sharing, you know, with him,” Alice reflects in the liner notes, “It’s sort of a being with him on a mental plane or on a spiritual plane.”

Though she’d been advised to keep her set to 20 minutes, it was clear from the outset that earthly matter of time and space were no longer of concern for Alice Coltrane. On its own, “Africa” clocks in at just under half an hour. Though this version of the tune has made the rounds as a bootleg (sourced from a WQXR broadcast), the quality of the recording here brings the piece to new life. It’s a bracing shift from the first half of the set, opening with a drum solo that settles itself into the main modal swing, with Sanders and Shepp trading squeals and growls as Alice comps into the mystic.

Though part of the live repertoire of John Coltrane’s second quartet (which featured Alice, Pharoah and Jimmy Garrison), “Leo” would’ve been new to most listeners, as it had yet to make an appearance on record. A visceral shock to the system, “Leo” hits a raw space between epiphany and breakdown, blaring out of the silence with utter frenetic intensity, leaving Carnegie Hall shrinking in the distance as the band hurtles toward the stratosphere. Alice’s piano comes alive in a rippling ascent toward the stellar regions, accessing making way for a dialogue of sheer rhythm between as Blackwell and Jarvis volley into deep space before we’re brought freefalling back to earth through screeching fields of skronk, landing down once again on a low and sonorous piano chord.

The Carnegie Hall Concert is the unbridled majesty of the House of Coltrane in full tilt— reverent and cathartic, a vast and roiling cosmos alive with the energy of raw creation colliding and exploding into pure expression, where peace and universal consciousness can finally exist for all.

  

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Af-1
Member since Apr 22nd 2008
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Sun Mar-24-24 10:05 PM

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7. "'Echologia' by PS5"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Italian group with tiny twinges of electronica and broken beat inspirations as well. Their last record was fantastic too!

https://pietrosantangelo.bandcamp.com/album/echologia

-----
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Visit our soul/jazz/funk internet radio station, Blue-in-Green:RADIO: http://www.blueingreenradio.com/
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spidey
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10. "RE: 'Echologia' by PS5"
In response to Reply # 7


  

          

Appreciated...loving it.

Integrity is the Cornerstone of Artistry...

  

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Af-1
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Sun Mar-24-24 10:07 PM

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8. "'Harlem to Havana' by New Jazz Underground"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Awesome new trio who have some excellent releases. They have a nice MF DOOM tribute on Bandcamp too which is worth checking out...

https://newjazzunderground.bandcamp.com/album/harlem-to-havana-afro-cuban-modernism-vol-1

-----
Check me out, say hi...
Visit our soul/jazz/funk internet radio station, Blue-in-Green:RADIO: http://www.blueingreenradio.com/
https://www.mixcloud.com/Blue_in_Green_Sessions/
http://soundcloud.com/user305437292

  

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Af-1
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Tue Apr-09-24 09:13 PM

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11. "'City Swamp' by Jake Long"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

The bandleader from London's Maisha (formerly on Brownswood) has a new project coming really soon which I'm excited about...

https://jakelong.bandcamp.com/album/city-swamp

-----
Check me out, say hi...
Visit our soul/jazz/funk internet radio station, Blue-in-Green:RADIO: http://www.blueingreenradio.com/
https://www.mixcloud.com/Blue_in_Green_Sessions/
http://soundcloud.com/user305437292

  

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thebigfunk
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Sat Apr-13-24 10:27 AM

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17. "will keep a look out. thanks"
In response to Reply # 11


          


-thebigfunk

~ i could still snort you under the table ~

  

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thebigfunk
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12. "josh johnson - unusual objects"
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Just out last week, mostly solo sax -- pretty impressive on first listen.

Johnson put in major work producing and playing on Meshell's Omnichord Songbook and is in the same circles as a lot of the others that showed up there (Jeff Parker, Makaya McCraven, et al).

-thebigfunk

~ i could still snort you under the table ~

  

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thebigfunk
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Wed Apr-10-24 08:08 PM

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13. "and if you want another recent solo sax record..."
In response to Reply # 12


          

Jonah Parzen-Johnson's You're Never Really Alone fits the bill, but feels totally different from Josh Johnson's lp --- brings more drone, maybe a bit more of an experimental/noisier edge.

Both are worthy of much time and attention!

-thebigfunk

~ i could still snort you under the table ~

  

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A Love Supreme
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Thu Apr-11-24 10:51 AM

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15. "RE: josh johnson - unusual objects"
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saw him with jeff parkers ETA IVtet last summer and it was really good. gonna check out the album.

  

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thebigfunk
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Wed Apr-10-24 09:02 PM

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14. "Ches Smith - Laugh Ash"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Haven't listened all the way through but this seems like a pretty wild ride. Drummer/percussionist in circles with John Zorn, Mary Halvorson. on this record, James Brandon Lewis, Shahzad Ismaily, Anna Webber to name a few.

https://chessmithpyroclastic.bandcamp.com/album/laugh-ash

Combination of improvisation and clearly through-composed stuff. A lot of it shifts between electronic and live percussion, between more tightly structured, almost modern classical-ish stuff and wide-ranging jazz-ish.

Whatever it is, it's fun.

Pretty nice overview of his work: https://downbeat.com/news/detail/ches-smith-a-fearless-seeker

-thebigfunk

~ i could still snort you under the table ~

  

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A Love Supreme
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Thu Apr-11-24 12:40 PM

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16. "RE: Ches Smith - Laugh Ash"
In response to Reply # 14


          

nice. one of my favorite contemporary drummers for sure. loved his album fron 2021. https://weallbreakpyroclastic.bandcamp.com/album/path-of-seven-colors

  

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