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Lobby General Discussion topic #12724366

Subject: "did Roger Troutman change the sound of R&B?" Previous topic | Next topic
mistermaxxx08
Member since Dec 31st 2010
16076 posts
Tue Feb-10-15 11:42 PM

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"Poll question: did Roger Troutman change the sound of R&B?"


          

between his ability at playing various instruments and of course the talk box and his singing what you think?

Poll result (4 votes)
Yes (2 votes)Vote
naw (2 votes)Vote
in between on this (0 votes)Vote
another Greasy haired Jerri Curl cat from back in the day (0 votes)Vote

  

  

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Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
I think he took R&B from the Freddie Jackson/ Alexander O'Neal
Feb 11th 2015
1
He helped usher R&B in to the computerized 80s and thus into
Feb 11th 2015
2
Word, I think that's probably what make song like "Computer Love"
Feb 11th 2015
3

Boogie Stimuli
Member since Sep 24th 2010
13170 posts
Wed Feb-11-15 08:26 AM

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1. "I think he took R&B from the Freddie Jackson/ Alexander O'Neal"
In response to Reply # 0


          

era into the Bobby Brown/Jodeci era.

There's a certain level of "cool" and contemporary flavor in the slow jams of the latter.
Rodger was kinda the first the bring that to the table in the most palatable way.
Of course he stems from the George Clinton school of funk where Bootsy, who made
"I'd Rather Be With You" also stemmed from, but whereas George and Bootsy were hella
silly with their funk, Rogder came with some shit that wouldn't cause your girl to bust out
laughing in your face if you played it on Valentine's day but still had the cool and flavor
of some funkier slow jams by Funkadelic offspring. I'm hard pressed to think of who may
have brought that to the table before him. I mean, you can rap over "Computer Love"
TODAY and it still go hard. Who else was that forward looking?

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"Until you get outta my way, I don't wanna hear what you say aye aye"

  

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T Reynolds
Member since Apr 16th 2007
42098 posts
Wed Feb-11-15 08:32 AM

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2. "He helped usher R&B in to the computerized 80s and thus into"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

its modern aesthetics.

It's a sound obviously is regional, most heavily adhered to in the West Coast and the Midwest, but the whose influence carried over to modern R&B as a whole.

  

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Boogie Stimuli
Member since Sep 24th 2010
13170 posts
Wed Feb-11-15 11:33 AM

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3. "Word, I think that's probably what make song like "Computer Love""
In response to Reply # 2


          

and "I Wanna Be Your Man" kinda prophetic too.
He left the sound of instruments alone way back then even though George blatantly
did it first with "Computer Games"... Rodger followed and made it a lil more relatable.

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"Until you get outta my way, I don't wanna hear what you say aye aye"

  

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