Printer-friendly copy Email this topic to a friend
Lobby General Discussion topic #12647560

Subject: "I saw SELMA, Ava DuVernay's MLK biopic, last night." Previous topic | Next topic
Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
82950 posts
Wed Nov-12-14 12:30 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
"I saw SELMA, Ava DuVernay's MLK biopic, last night."


  

          

It's very very good.

My review for Movie Mezzanine:
http://moviemezzanine.com/afi-fest-review-selma/

AFI FEST REVIEW: “SELMA”
November 12, 2014 AFI

Ava DuVernay’s Selma is a joyful, angry, and sad film– occasionally all three in the same scene. It’s smart, soulful, and deeply affecting, boasting some truly powerhouse moments and containing nary a misstep. At the heart of the film’s deep and absurdly talented cast of characters is an unmistakably human depiction of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., played by a pitch-perfect David Oyelowo. There are a myriad of ways in which a film about Dr. King could have become cheap, manipulative, and unworthy of his memory, and yet DuVernay dodges every potential pitfall. Selma is one of the best films of the year, one of the best biopics of the last decade, and one of the best films ever made on the civil rights movement.

It’s 1965. Black people have the right to vote, but down South, the white people in charge of voter registration have made it nearly impossible for them to exercise this right. Lyndon Johnson (Tom Wilkinson) believes that the issue is far from a priority, but Martin Luther King Jr. Sees the forest for the trees. If black people can’t vote, they can’t elect lawmakers and judges, they can’t sit on juries, and they can’t receive justice when racists inevitably brutalize and kill black people in the recently desegregated South.

King asks President Johnson for help. When Johnson refuses, King decides to push the issue to the forefront of the national conversation. His plan: use his style of non-violent civil disobedience to aggravate the whites in Selma, Alabama, stir up trouble, and subsequently stir up the attention of the media. If a Nobel Prize winner can’t get the attention of the president in person, maybe he can when people are being beaten on the cover of every newspaper around the country.

DuVernay’s refusal to deify the activist heroes is her film’s greatest asset. It’s easy to imagine Dr. King as some godlike image of perfection – never tired, never worried, never mistaken – but this depiction would be an insult to his accomplishments. King isn’t an inspiration because he’s a model of human perfection; he’s an inspiration because he had the same fears and insecurities that we all do, yet he managed to overcome them and persevere. In Selma, Oyelowo’s face does the talking. He knows that he’s far more likely to be killed than he is to succeed, and that knowledge makes him constantly tired. King is depicted here as a soldier, behind enemy lines for years and fatigued from the battle.

Indeed, the movie begins with King imagining a peaceful life with Coretta when his fighting days are over. At first, we think it’s dramatic irony, as we know how this story concludes. As the film progresses, however, we realize we’re not the only ones in on the ending. King knows he’s going to die. He just doesn’t quite know when.

While the film doesn’t deify its heroes, cinematographer Bradford Young certainly manages to make them all look extraordinary. From his work on Dee Rees’ Pariah, Andrew Dosunmu’s Mother of George, DuVernay’s Middle of Nowhere, and now this, only one inescapable conclusion can be reached: no D.P. in the history of cinema has shot black people more beautifully than Bradford Young. As DuVernay put it in the Q&A following the film’s AFI Film Festival premiere, “he loves black skin.” Too many cinematographers in Hollywood wash out their black actors with too much light or muddy the richness of their skin color with not enough light. Not Young.

If you’re skeptical, look at how Oyelowo is lit in some of his Hollywood fare versus how Young lights him in Middle of Nowhere and Selma. Most cinematographers of studio fare wouldn’t even dare try a shot in which dark-skinned actors sit in the shadows of a dark room—they wouldn’t know where to begin. Selma has some of its best scenes at night: whether a crowded jail cell, a car ride, or a late-night phone call to Mahalia Jackson, every image is lush. If you haven’t put Bradford Young on your Mount Rushmore of the best cinematographers working today, you still have time to remedy your mistake.

Oyelowo knows how to play scenes and Young knows how to shoot scenes… but it’s DuVernay who knows how to find their magic. I could make a laundry list of my favorite moments in this film that would extend to the floor like a scroll. The terrible dread seeing four little girls talking about hair in a church. The rousing monologue delivered by the always-magnificent Lorraine Toussaint. A jaw-dropping moment of silence between Martin and Coretta. The history of Cager Lee, performed by Henry G. Sanders, achingly sad and inspiring. I’ve come to expect magic moments in Ava DuVernay’s films, and she has yet to disappoint me. This is her first feature made for over a million dollars. It is beyond exciting to think of the possibilities of what she can accomplish with a decent budget in the future.

Most importantly, Selma manages to wordlessly tie the events of the past to the realities of the present. A young black man is needlessly shot by a white police officer. A city is divided between its population (the majority of which is black), and its government officials and lawmen (the majority of whom are white). Non-violent protests by the black community lead to police brutality. How embarrassing is it that you don’t know if I’m describing events from 1965 or 2014?

Selma isn’t just a beautifully executed biopic; it’s a call to action. After murders during his protests, King calls out everyone who sits by idly as injustice is perpetrated, giving their hands an equal share of the blood. DuVernay doesn’t lean on the contemporary social relevance of the material; she’s smart enough to know that she doesn’t need to. The story isn’t about one man who fought hard to bring about change. It’s about the mass effort necessary to make such change happen, and the responsibility for injustice shared among the inactive. As long as, to quote Mos Def, “the length of black life is treated with short worth,” Selma will remain an endlessly urgent and relevant work of art.

Grade: A

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top


Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
Great, because I plan to go see it.
Nov 12th 2014
1
I wanted to see it because Ava DuVernay but now I really have to
Nov 12th 2014
2
pretty much
Nov 12th 2014
3
He should teach a master class.
Nov 12th 2014
4
Glad to hear this!
Nov 12th 2014
5
they mad
Jan 07th 2015
18
Jesus Christ. I expected it to be bad. Not THAT bad.
Jan 09th 2015
19
there is a great interview with him on DP/30:
Jan 09th 2015
20
Great DP. Restless City was beautifully shot
Jan 06th 2015
14
Up.
Jan 06th 2015
6
For Whites only: Armond White Review (link)
Jan 06th 2015
7
It must be awesome to get paid to troll
Jan 06th 2015
9
Imixwhatilike Dr Jared Ball, Dr Carr and Ericka Blount Danois on Selma
Jan 06th 2015
8
RE: thanx for posting this
Jan 11th 2015
35
      No problem
Jan 11th 2015
36
Rolling Stone interview with Ava DuVernay, the writer/director:
Jan 06th 2015
10
I'm going to see a screener tonight
Jan 06th 2015
11
Awesome. I really want to see it again this weekend.
Jan 06th 2015
12
      RE: Awesome. I really want to see it again this weekend.
Jan 06th 2015
13
           Those will both be in my Top 5, for sure.
Jan 06th 2015
16
White guilt Oscar bait, or nah?
Jan 06th 2015
15
yeah, mostly white guilt, i think.
Jan 09th 2015
25
Selma omits radicals to fit the "Black bourgeois"/ white narrative
Jan 07th 2015
17
Watched the screener last night. I wasn't wowed, I expected to be.. but
Jan 09th 2015
21
This is a movie that requires a big screen, imo.
Jan 09th 2015
23
Yeah I doubt thats it, just wasn't a very good movie. Glad you enjoyed
Jan 09th 2015
26
I saw the preview in IMAX..
Jan 09th 2015
27
i wasn't wowed seeing it in a theater.
Jan 09th 2015
24
Is Stokely in it?
Jan 09th 2015
22
These niggas don't have a clue who Stokley is
Jan 09th 2015
28
ahem, you really are going off the deep end
Jan 09th 2015
29
      This film ain't for you dummy
Jan 09th 2015
30
No. But I thought that Andew Young looked a whole lot like him.
Jan 11th 2015
39
free tix for nyc teenagers Jan 8-19th
Jan 11th 2015
31
Ava DuVernay is REAL fine to me.
Jan 11th 2015
32
Beautiful woman.
Jan 11th 2015
33
She is sexy
Jan 11th 2015
34
I agree.
Jan 11th 2015
37
Great documentary on civil rights movement and Selma
Jan 11th 2015
38
I thought it was very good. And I thought some other things too. [spoile...
Jan 11th 2015
40
link to louisiana literacy test
Jan 12th 2015
41

daryloneal
Member since Jan 08th 2005
9267 posts
Wed Nov-12-14 12:46 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
1. "Great, because I plan to go see it."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

---
but have you ever checked out my website? www.dtaylorimages.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

DaHeathenOne76
Member since May 11th 2003
29354 posts
Wed Nov-12-14 01:27 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
2. "I wanted to see it because Ava DuVernay but now I really have to"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Thanks
*****************************************
http://prettyperiod.me/

Nigga, you so ticked off
Can't let up long enough to get over it
Brotha, can I live, can a sister live?
Goddamn

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

lfresh
Member since Jun 18th 2002
92693 posts
Wed Nov-12-14 02:22 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
3. "pretty much"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

"no D.P. in the history of cinema has shot black people more beautifully than Bradford Young."


~~~~
When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices. Live so that when you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.
~~~~
You cannot hate people for their own good.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
82950 posts
Wed Nov-12-14 05:31 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
4. "He should teach a master class."
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

Not a joke. All of the best studio DPs could learn.

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
DJ007
Member since Apr 06th 2003
5447 posts
Wed Nov-12-14 07:48 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
5. "Glad to hear this! "
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

Hoping Bradford gets more much deserved work on other films ! Great review Frank can't wait to see this and purchase "Middle of Nowhere" on DVD in January
_____________________________________________________
"You can win with certainty with the spirit of "one cut". "Musashi Miyamoto

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
lfresh
Member since Jun 18th 2002
92693 posts
Wed Jan-07-15 12:34 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
18. "they mad"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

>Not a joke. All of the best studio DPs could learn.

http://deadline.com/2014/12/selma-bradford-young-black-cinematography-1201338543/


the comments
man they MAD

~~~~
When you are born, you cry, and the world rejoices. Live so that when you die, you rejoice, and the world cries.
~~~~
You cannot hate people for their own good.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

            
Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
82950 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 02:21 AM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
19. "Jesus Christ. I expected it to be bad. Not THAT bad."
In response to Reply # 18


  

          

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
Castro
Charter member
48680 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 02:45 AM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
20. "there is a great interview with him on DP/30:"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHz1mGv4ERg

------------------
One Hundred.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Solaam
Charter member
2997 posts
Tue Jan-06-15 11:32 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
14. "Great DP. Restless City was beautifully shot"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

He's one of the best going right now.

PS3/Xbox ID: BackDo Do
Wii: Solaam

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
82950 posts
Tue Jan-06-15 01:42 AM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
6. "Up."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Musa
Member since Mar 08th 2006
15261 posts
Tue Jan-06-15 09:48 AM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
7. "For Whites only: Armond White Review (link) "
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://m.nationalreview.com/article/395306/whites-only-armond-white
Ava DuVernay’s Selma makes a valiant attempt to snatch back the 1960s Civil Rights Movement from Hollywood — the filmmaking institution that has lately used America’s racial history for its own white liberal self-aggrandizement. (Who can forget the throwback image of British director Steve McQueen jumping Jim Crow at this year’s Oscars?) But the problem with Selma is that it’s a Hollywood movie at heart. DuVernay does the same foreshortening of history seen in such recent films as The Great Debaters, The Help and The Butler. Though less egregious than those, Selma doesn’t find a distinctive tone; it’s similarly self-congratulatory.

Opening on Martin Luther King and his wife Coretta as they dress up to receive his 1965 Nobel Peace Prize, DuVernay does a couple interesting but curious things: She establishes a glamorous sexy vibe between these African American dignitaries and recreates a moment of their renown. Not that Selma needs to begin with the grassroots incidents that inspired the famous March from Selma to the Alabama state capital Montgomery — one of several events that galvanized the movement — but it’s unclear where DuVernay is headed with this sequence of familiar events. By first going for the gold, DuVernay seems to opt for celebrity over history. Though titled Selma, the film settles for being the Martin Luther King Show.

To start with Nobel recognition keeps Selma within the shadow of Official (white liberal) approval rather than portraying the movement in terms of authentic domestic (meaning American and African-American) values and goals. DuVernay’s best efforts seem impersonal but probably aren’t, because much of black American history is still seen through the hegemony of those who control the media’s image of black people. These days, few filmmakers are willing to complicate typical black movie stereotypes, even when the stereotypes are “dignified.” DuVernay’s background as a publicist suggests that she may not know the difference.

Immediately following the Nobel sequence, DuVernay segues into another flashback, this time an idyllic scene of little black girls descending a staircase gleefully discussing Coretta Scott King’s fashion sense. A sudden explosion blows the children into the air like dolls floating in slow-motion. (A recreation of the 1963 Birmingham church bombing that killed four black girls.) At this point, Selma’s hop-scotch narrative from Stockholm to Birmingham to Selma to Washington, D.C. looks like a collection of the Movement’s Greatest Hits (pardon the expression). DuVernay is telling a very well-known story in an overly familiar way — rubbing soft spots (brutalized children, women and white Northerners allying with the Movement) and sore spots (the 1965 murders of Jimmie Lee Johnson and Viola Liuzzo) rather than making meaning.

Not a single scene in Selma seems felt. Every plot turn is a nudge — and a boast — intended to remind viewers of a golden history to which they can easily lay claim. Some will argue that this is necessary in order to enlighten generations who may be ignorant of that history, but the problem is that slick familiarization prevents them from understanding the complexities of the past. And they don’t properly earn it — to borrow a term from Spielberg’s Saving Private Ryan.

Think back to the scene in Spielberg’s 1985 The Color Purple (Hollywood’s foremost black female melodrama, which at one time widely repudiated but has since won rightful bonafides from a popular audience holding fast against disdainful critical fad and responding to the film with pure feeling and genuine affirmation). One of The Color Purple’s many memorable moments showed Oprah Winfrey as the prideful heavyset black Southern woman Sofia being slapped by a white sheriff and socking back; she ends up pistol-whipped, knocked out in the middle of a dusty street, the wind blowing her dress to pathetically expose her underwear. The humanizing details are part of the scene’s artistry and powerful effect. But in Selma, Winfrey’s appearance as Annie Mae Johnson, the voting rights activist who was brutalized and arrested by Alabama police, merely seems routine. It uses Oprah’s sanctimonious certitude that reenacting Johnson’s story (and the right to vote) is sufficient, even though these flashes of Johnson’s life are less compelling than that painful flash of panties. Spielberg’s image of underwear and an uncovered large brown thigh coexists with national memory of those formally-dressed black Americans who were beaten and hosed-down and attacked by dogs while petitioning. It’s what film scholars would call a synecdoche, symbolizing something deeper than Sofia’s wounded flesh and insulted pride; calling upon one’s own shame and inspiring compassion. Less ingenious replays of violence — tendentious representations of “history”–don’t stick in the memory but merely win a cursory response.

Noting Selma’s lack of imaginative power isn’t to slam DuVernay but to point out basic standards by which we can rightfully view movies — especially films about race, a subject that is rarely well executed. Selma is part of a Hollywood movement that easily exploits race through the eagerness of filmmakers and audiences to claim “the right side of history.” Viewers of The Help, The Butler and Selma are encouraged to profess an inheritance they do not earn merely from watching a superficial Civil Rights Best-Of reel.

<----

Soundcloud.com/aquil84

(HIP HOP)
http://aquil.bandcamp.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
legsdiamond
Member since May 05th 2011
62657 posts
Tue Jan-06-15 10:44 AM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
9. "It must be awesome to get paid to troll"
In response to Reply # 7


          

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Musa
Member since Mar 08th 2006
15261 posts
Tue Jan-06-15 09:57 AM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
8. "Imixwhatilike Dr Jared Ball, Dr Carr and Ericka Blount Danois on Selma"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

https://m.soundcloud.com/imixwhatilike/dr-john-henrik-clarke-selma-and-mass-media?utm_source=soundcloud&utm_campaign=wtshare&utm_medium=Twitter&utm_content=https://soundcloud.com/imixwhatilike/dr-john-henrik-clarke-selma-and-mass-media

22min Mark.

<----

Soundcloud.com/aquil84

(HIP HOP)
http://aquil.bandcamp.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
bucknchange
Member since May 07th 2003
3590 posts
Sun Jan-11-15 06:04 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
35. "RE: thanx for posting this"
In response to Reply # 8


  

          

love dr. carr (took like 4 classes with him @ HU)
had a feeling the film was gonna be what it is with oprah involved...

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
Musa
Member since Mar 08th 2006
15261 posts
Sun Jan-11-15 06:12 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
36. "No problem"
In response to Reply # 35


  

          

.

<----

Soundcloud.com/aquil84

(HIP HOP)
http://aquil.bandcamp.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
82950 posts
Tue Jan-06-15 11:47 AM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
10. "Rolling Stone interview with Ava DuVernay, the writer/director:"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://www.rollingstone.com/movies/features/ava-duvernay-on-making-selma-20150105

>We Shall Overcome: Ava DuVernay on Making 'Selma'

The groundbreaking director talks about downplaying LBJ, honoring MLK's legacy and why you should always have Oprah on your film sets

BY GAVIN EDWARDS | January 5, 2015

As a filmmaker, you put the film out there, and you just want it to be okay," says director Ava DuVernay. "You don't want to let people down; you don't want to embarrass yourself." She's done much better than that with Selma, a dramatization of the 1965 protests in Alabama led by Martin Luther King, Jr.; the movie, considered to be a leading Oscar contender, has already received four Golden Globe nominations. Peter Travers said in his rave review in Rolling Stone that DuVernay "blows the dust off history to find its beating heart."

DuVernay, 42 years old, grew up in Compton, but spent summers in Alabama. A film publicist before she shifted careers to directing, she had actually signed up to do publicity for an earlier version of Selma. The screenplay had bounced around for over five years, attached to directors such as Lee Daniels. "It was looked at as an unmakeable movie," says executive producer Paul Garnes. But British actor David Oyelowo — who had appeared in DuVernay's Sundance award-winner Middle of Nowhere — very much wanted to play King, and unbeknownst to DuVernay, was lobbying for her with an international team of producers. Despite a resumé that was limited to two microbudget features, a half-dozen documentaries, and an episode of Scandal, she got the job, and a $20 million budget.

Our conversation with DuVernay in a vegan Mexican restaurant in Hollywood happened three days before Joseph A. Califano, Jr., a former Lyndon B. Johnson aide, wrote a Washington Post op-ed complaining not only that Selma gave Johnson (played by Tom Wilkinson) short shrift, but that the president had come up with the idea for the protests himself. As it happens, earlier versions of the script focused on the relationship between King and the commander-in-chief, and how their joint efforts led to passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act. She discussed why she had chosen to place less emphasis on Johnson, her casting philosophy and why it helps to have Oprah on your film set.

RS: Let's talk about reducing LBJ's role in the events you depict in the film.

AD: Every filmmaker imbues a movie with their own point of view. The script was the LBJ/King thing, but originally, it was much more slanted to Johnson. I wasn't interested in making a white-savior movie; I was interested in making a movie centered on the people of Selma. You have to bring in some context for what it was like to live in the racial terrorism that was going on in the deep south at that time. The four little girls have to be there, and then you have to bring in the women. So I started adding women.

This is a dramatization of the events. But what's important for me as a student of this time in history is to not deify what the president did. Johnson has been hailed as a hero of that time, and he was, but we're talking about a reluctant hero. He was cajoled and pushed, he was protective of a legacy — he was not doing things out of the goodness of his heart. Does it make it any worse or any better? I don't think so. History is history and he did do it eventually. But there was some process to it that was important to show.


RS: Many presidents couldn't have done it.

AD: Absolutely. Or wouldn't have even if they could.


RS: I thought Tim Roth's performance as George Wallace was very nuanced, when it would have been easy to play him as Snidely Whiplash.

AD: I wanted to try to make everyone as human as possible. That trap that I see so many non-black filmmakers do with black characters, where everything is surface and stereotypical...I didn't want to be the black filmmaker that does that with the white characters. Tim has talked about every actor has to love the character that they're playing in some way, and in the time that we're talking about, there's not a lot to love in Wallace if you believe in justice and dignity. But he found a videotape or an article of his son talking about him, and so he was able to tap into the father doing what he thought was right.

Whether it was Roth or Tom Wilkinson — or Giovanni Ribisi, Stephen Root and Alessandro Nivola — all these characters represented a real diversity of thought about this issue from the white perspective, from the dominant culture. I wanted to create an array of folks who all thought about it in a different way because white thought wasn't a monolith at that time, just as black thought wasn't a monolith.


RS: What was your philosophy when you were casting?

AD: To work with people who fascinate me. Oprah being in the cast allowed me to have flexibility because she is such a big name. Her fame and her power created space for me to be able to hire Stephan James, a 19-year-old from Canada, for John Lewis instead of the hot young guy who was just in The Fast and the Furious, or whatever. I was able to pick and choose cool people.


RS: What was it like having Oprah on the set?

AD: Her first day of shooting was the day that Maya Angelou died. I had just driven up to the set in Marietta when I got a call on my cell phone from Andrew Young, the real Andrew Young: "Sister Maya has passed on." And all I could think of was Oprah was on her way to the set. I immediately called her and said don't come, we'll do it another day. Tight schedule, a 32-day shoot, not a lot of room to move things around — but we'll figure it out. She said, "No, I can do this, it's okay." She had the same trailer as everyone else. I spoke with her briefly, and I should've stayed, but I had to go out back to the set: I had 200 extras out there. So I called Tyler Perry, he sneaked onto the set, they had their moment, and she came out ready to go. I'm grateful to him; most people see us as very different filmmakers, but in that moment we were united around Oprah.


RS: How did your old job as a publicist prepare you to do this?

AD: To make a film?


RS: As opposed to eating guacamole, yes.

AD: (Laughs) Just being able to talk to people. I used to coordinate and develop and execute really big campaigns for studios with a lot of moving parts. But the main thing is just articulating what's in your head, which we overestimate that people can do — how do you get that out in a way that's clear and un-muddled with the intention of producing a result?


RS: What was the hardest scene to shoot, emotionally?

AD: When Jimmy Lee Jackson was murdered in the cafe. At that time there was no Mike Brown murder, there was no Eric Garner murder — but there were so many others that are just ambient. It's part of the atmosphere as a black person growing up in this country: You know that's it's happening somewhere on that very day. And a month later Mike Brown was killed. (Cinematographer) Bradford Young, (editor) Spencer Averick, and I, we designed that scene in a really specific way. It was really important that we have all that stuff worked out in advance because I knew it was going to be a rough, emotional day. This wasn't a day for improvisation.


RS: King's tactics imply that his supporters are going to have to get hurt: Nonviolence doesn't work unless the other side overreacts.

AD: Being passive doesn't mean sitting there and getting hit for the sake of getting hit. And it wasn't all faith-based, either. There were some very practical reasons why it was used. You talk to most people about King now and they only know "I Have a Dream," and that he believed in peace and then he died. Really? That's what he's been reduced to? And we've allowed it to happen. And if there is anything that Selma does, it reinvigorates the narrative around him to be more full-bodied and more truthful about what his tactics were.


RS: Are you religious yourself?

AD: No, not religious. But I love God.


RS: Can you talk about the aesthetics of violence of Selma? When the church blows up and kills those four little girls, it's harrowing, but it's also filmed in a beautiful way. How do those two things work together?

AD: I don't know if my intention was to make it beautiful. How do you film four little girls being blown apart? There's a way to do it with a certain reverence and respect for who they were. That's why it was important for me that you hear their voices before it happens.


RS: There's a sinking feeling in that scene — I counted five little girls, so I was hoping maybe it wasn't going to happen.

AD: There were five girls and one lived. And I put in a boy, to misdirect you on purpose. The violence throughout the film follows the same pattern. I resisted the idea of just it being a physical blow. That spectacle has been done: All we do in this industry is blow people up. But how does the hit feel and what does the face do after? What happens to that broken body and what happens to the people that have to tend to that broken body? It's important to have the morgue scene after Jimmie Lee Jackson's death, to show the mother and slow down on her face, to slow down the girls, to slow down Annie Lee Cooper when the men put their hands on her and take her down. It was about having a reverence for that was the idea behind it instead of, say, making it beautiful. You're saying: This is worth taking a closer look at. Everybody stop and pay your respects to this.


RS: Can you pinpoint a moment of joy that happened while you were making this movie?

AD: So many things come to mind, but there was a day that we were filming in Richie Jean Jackson's house, doing that scene when they all walk into the kitchen. We're at this house in Atlanta, we had shut down the street. That was the day that Tim Roth and Giovanni Ribisi were coming for their hair and makeup tests. They have to come to see me, 'cause I can't get away. So they come to the set, and I thought, "Look at all my guys, they're all together — the White House guys, Wallace, the black guys." Those characters never cross, right? The chance to see them all together was so fun. Then a black SUV starts coming up the street, going around cones. Our assistant directors and our production assistants are running down, saying, don't go, they're shooting. The door opens and out comes Oprah. She's not supposed to be there; we thought she wasn't even in the state that day! She starts walking towards me and I just run up to her and give her a big old hug. It was like a house party in the street.


RS: How was it having people like the actual Andrew Young on the set?

AD: So cool. And it easily could not have been if they were grouchy curmudgeons. But there's still a spark about them. These are our greatest minds, our greatest radicals. Time has not done them in. If you look John Lewis in the eye and he's talkin' to you about something, you're like "Uh huh, let's go do it!" When I sat down with them, I was really clear that we weren't asking for anybody's permission.

But this (film) is not called "King"; this is Selma. This was as much the story about the band of brothers and sisters that were around him as it was King's story. There haven't been great pains taken to show that he was a leader among leaders — all of them could've probably done it. Why him? He could talk the best. He was an orator who was able to synthesize all these ideas in a way that spoke to the masses and also that spoke to people in power. But they were there and they were the masterminds behind it. I tried to show the strategy, the tactics, the arguments. That's how history is made, not by consensus, but by people freakin' battling it out, right? That's how change happens.

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Sha
Member since Mar 25th 2004
68448 posts
Tue Jan-06-15 11:57 AM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy listClick to send message via AOL IM
11. "I'm going to see a screener tonight"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

so excited!

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
82950 posts
Tue Jan-06-15 04:51 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
12. "Awesome. I really want to see it again this weekend."
In response to Reply # 11


  

          

Before I solidify my Top 10 of the Year.

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
SankofaII
Charter member
30751 posts
Tue Jan-06-15 06:40 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy listClick to send message via AOL IM
13. "RE: Awesome. I really want to see it again this weekend."
In response to Reply # 12


  

          

>Before I solidify my Top 10 of the Year.

SELMA
INHERENT VICE

All come out Friday. GOOD LORDT!!! Double the awesomeness....

oh and the final entry in the TAKEN franchise comes out Friday too!

Get Out the Room
https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/get-out-the-room/id525657893

Some of y'all need this in your life: http://www.psychology.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

            
Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
82950 posts
Tue Jan-06-15 11:44 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
16. "Those will both be in my Top 5, for sure."
In response to Reply # 13


  

          

I just gotsta figure out where they all fall.

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

PimpTrickGangstaClik
Member since Oct 06th 2005
14369 posts
Tue Jan-06-15 11:36 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
15. "White guilt Oscar bait, or nah?"
In response to Reply # 0
Tue Jan-06-15 11:38 PM by PimpTrickGangstaClik

  

          

I'm hearing Oscar buzz around this movie. Is it worthy by its own merits?

_______________________________________
You ain't the only one whose got problems. You ain't the only one who knows pain. Get up off your ass and just solve them. You still got a chance to try to change, try the shit again.
Devin tha Dude

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
SoWhat
Charter member
154163 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 04:09 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
25. "yeah, mostly white guilt, i think."
In response to Reply # 15
Fri Jan-09-15 04:16 PM by SoWhat

  

          

it'll garner nominations but i'll be surprised if it wins much of anything during award season. i hope if it doesn't win much that ppl don't decry that as more Hollywood racism. the pessimist in me suspects folks will use the Selma losses and 12 Yrs a Slave wins as proof that Hollywood only lauds 'our' movies when they're about something negative like slavery or gang life or drugs or whatever, but they ignore our stories that instill pride like Selma does. they'd be wrong about that b/c 12 YAS is a far superior piece of moviemaking than Selma, w/o regard for content. 12 YAS deserved every award it won. if Selma wins i'll be happy for the producers and directors and cast and whoever else wins. i just don't expect it not b/c of the story but b/c the movie ain't THAT worthy and i expect to see other movies that're more worthy.

fuck you.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Musa
Member since Mar 08th 2006
15261 posts
Wed Jan-07-15 10:17 AM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
17. "Selma omits radicals to fit the "Black bourgeois"/ white narrative"
In response to Reply # 0
Wed Jan-07-15 10:21 AM by Musa

  

          

Selma ignores the radical grassroots politics of the civil rights movement.

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/120685/selma-lessons-ava-duvernays-film

By Jesse McCarthy

There is a remarkable scene in Ava DuVernay’s ambitious new film, Selma, where Coretta Scott King (wonderfully played by Carmen Ejogo), fearing for the life of her family, describes being overcome by the “fog of death.” It’s an apt phrase, and all the more so for it’s subtle echo of the “fog of war,” that realm of deception and uncertainty that clouds our reading of human intentions under inhumane conditions. More than ever, one feels caught up in that “fog of death.” As the tragedies in New York City and Missouri among citizens and the police accumulate, and tensions escalate, so does the sense of an eerie fog of war.

For months a question mark hovered over the protests surrounding Michael Brown’s killing in Ferguson and Eric Garner’s killing in New York City: Would the spontaneous and sporadic language of protest, anger, and injury become a sustained movement for equality and justice? Although the path forward remains murky and imperiled, there can no longer be any doubt: There is a social movement for racial justice in this country with a broader base and louder voice—particularly among millennials—than at any time since the late and tragic phase of the Civil Rights movement. Into this turbulence comes a film that sounds like a biopic, feels like a history lesson, and looks very much like an allegory of the present. But what exactly are the lessons today’s movement can draw from Selma?



DuVernay opens her film with King struggling to tie an ascot—a clever metonym for his discomfort with the world of white privilege and power that he will spend the rest of the film contentiously confronting. The scene is resolutely domestic: Coretta assists and encourages him; secured in his black manhood, he goes before the great white world to do what he can for his people—give a speech. These respective gender roles largely shape the script. The women in DuVernay’s film console, lend support, explain, bear, and endure—they must be strong for their men, and for each other. But the actual strategizing, the activism in action is decidedly the provenance of King and his cadre of Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) pastors and supporters. We get a passing, glamorous glance at the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee’s (SNCC) Diane Nash as she gets out of a car, but beyond the identifying caption, nothing in the film illustrates her fiery commitment or talented militancy.

To convey women’s resistance, the film relies instead on Oprah Winfrey, who plays Annie Lee Cooper, famous for her defiance at the steps of the Selma courthouse when she punched Sheriff Jim Clark. Yet Oprah’s best scene, the one people will remember, is surely her earlier confrontation with the voter registration officer who demonstrates the racist, intimidating function of polling tests. There’s no question that many women and men did muster extraordinary resolve and dignity to try and register on their own, but the film again misses an opportunity to evoke the collective history, the activist history, and indeed, a women’s empowerment history.

In it’s rush to enshrine and reconfirm the charismatic male leadership of the movement, this film fails to honor the great female fountainheads of that movement, Septima Clark and Ella Baker, and women like Fannie Lou Hamer in the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, whose work on voter-registration and literacy, through the Citizenship Schools, were the true incubators of activism and irrigators of the Civil Rights movement. At a time when men still unthinkingly expected the women to take notes as the men talked politics at meetings, Baker, the outspoken guiding spirit of SNCC, proved an indispensable leader, instrumental at every level in the success of Freedom Summer.

What it comes down to is that Selma expresses at every turn the political perspective of the black middle class, which prefers to perceive the civil rights struggle through the lens of individual dignity and negotiation, as opposed to collective urgency and direct action. There is nothing inherently wrong with this, both currents were, and indeed remain, important drivers of change. But it explains the film’s contemptuous handling of any whiff of radical politics. The groundbreaking work of SNCC, for example, is dismissed as hot-headed petulance. An utterly bizarre performance by Nigel Thatch of Malcolm X presents him simultaneously as rakish and emasculated, a potential threat to a good woman, without any trace of a threat to white supremacy; while the film redacts Stokely Carmichael from the record entirely. Lowndes County, Alabama comes up several times, but those who don’t know their movement history will not know he was there, or recognize it as the birthplace of the Black Panther party.

While it may better suit the needs of a Hollywood picture, the top-down narrative, which monumentalizes the SCLC and NAACP around King’s leadership, has in fact long been refuted and corrected by scholars and historians. While no one should forego seeing Selma, those truly invested in thinking about how a grassroots movement takes shape, takes over a national debate, and forges a new political consciousness, should immediately go and read Charles M. Payne’s magnificent and meticulous study: I’ve Got the Light of Freedom, or watch, or re-watch (for those who saw a snippet in high school) PBS’s definitive Eyes on the Prize documentary series.

Two years ago I had the enormous privilege of taking a class with Bob Moses, one of the key figures in SNCC. Moses was born in Harlem, graduated from Stuyvesant, and already had degrees from Hamilton College and Harvard before he went to work for SNCC registering black voters in Mississippi in 1961. Like a number of other SNCC members coming down from the North sporting Ivy credentials, he expected to bring organizing expertise to people who didn’t have anything. To his and many others’ surprise, they found that the folk around there were already organized, had been in contact with Communists who had come down in the 1930s, and could tell you about parents, uncles and aunts, and grandparents who had been in the streetcar boycotts of 1904, who had fought their ways to the polls in the 1870s during the Reconstruction, fending off the Klan and the Red Shirts and the White League. In short, the movement had always already been there. Its time was always now. (Bob Moses is still at it—he’s been teaching math in Mississippi as part of the Algebra Project, a nonprofit he started in 1981.)



Ava DuVernay is a talented filmmaker, but there is an awkward irony in her film reasserting a top-down narrative of the movement just as a new movement with a new generation is utterly rejecting that very model. It has been widely observed that today’s protest movement is characteristically leaderless. The organizers are as often as not working class, many of them women, with a notably visible queer presence, obviously unimaginable at Selma 50 years ago. There is a broad level of comfort with relative anonymity; the person organizing your die-in may only be known to you by a twitter handle. Many have also noticed how secular this movement is. The black church, which in many corners has tended in recent years to fervently embrace aspirational values and so called “prosperity theology,” has lost a great deal of credibility with young activists, and therefore influence. When Al Sharpton—the presumed charismatic black male pastor of our time called for a massive day of action for December 13 and a march on Washington D.C. he got only a tepid turnout. The Millions March in New York City had over 50,000 people. The rejection of the old guard could not have been made more eloquently.

At a die-in you have time to think, and you think about bodies. At some point you realize that the history of your people is a history of bodies, or rather of corpses. Not always, but often these are taught to you as lists of men. Emmet Till’s in the pages of Jet Magazine. Malcolm at the Audubon. Martin Luther in Memphis. Fred Hampton in his bedroom in Chicago. Arthur McDuffie in Miami. Rodney King on the freeway. As you near the present they become screen grabs spaced ever closer together, faces suspended in the feed, strange fruit: Sean’s, Oscar’s, Trayvon’s, Michael’s, Eric’s, Tamir’s. These are the ones that get named, that attach themselves to history, that get entered into the ledger of the national discourse, but of course, there are others.

While on the surface current protests are about police brutality and a lack of accountability in our judicial system, there is an underlying anger at the indignity with which black bodies are routinely treated in the public sphere. There was rage specifically directed at authorities for leaving Michael Brown’s body bleeding into the asphalt for four-and-a-half hours. The chokehold was the legal focus of Eric Garner’s case, yet some of the most circulated pictures online were those showing an officer kneeling on his face. Part of what these protests have already achieved, and much of the enormous work still left undone, is dismantling the routine indifference and double standards American society applies to black bodies.

The literary scholar Saidiya Hartman of Columbia University has written of “the precariousness of empathy and the thin line between witness and spectator” in representations of the enslaved body: “How does one give expression to these outrages without exacerbating the indifference to suffering that is the consequence of the benumbing spectacle”? These are hard questions, and they are questions that black filmmakers like Ana DuVernay and Steve McQueen are forced to negotiate. There is no question that they have had, and will continue to have a major liberating impact on the kinds of representation available to black artists working within and without the industry.

<----

Soundcloud.com/aquil84

(HIP HOP)
http://aquil.bandcamp.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Binladen
Charter member
14113 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 12:16 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
21. "Watched the screener last night. I wasn't wowed, I expected to be.. but"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

wasnt. : (

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
82950 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 04:04 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
23. "This is a movie that requires a big screen, imo."
In response to Reply # 21


  

          

Not only for Bradford Young's gorgeous cinematography, but for the sense of community you get in a theater. This is a movie about community, and the awareness of sitting with others and feeling the tension in the room with those around you is a vital part of maximizing your experience with this film, in my opinion.

For beer lovers: http://thebeertravelguide.com
For movie lovers: http://russellhainline.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
Binladen
Charter member
14113 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 04:20 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
26. "Yeah I doubt thats it, just wasn't a very good movie. Glad you enjoyed"
In response to Reply # 23


  

          

it though.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
legsdiamond
Member since May 05th 2011
62657 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 04:21 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
27. "I saw the preview in IMAX.. "
In response to Reply # 23


          

I was moved by it. I hope it has that same impact on a regular screen

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
SoWhat
Charter member
154163 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 04:06 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
24. "i wasn't wowed seeing it in a theater."
In response to Reply # 21


  

          

it's good but not great.

fuck you.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

BlassFemur
Member since Mar 26th 2008
10276 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 12:19 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
22. "Is Stokely in it?"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

https://banafrit.com/
http://middlebrainmedia.com/

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Musa
Member since Mar 08th 2006
15261 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 08:07 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
28. "These niggas don't have a clue who Stokley is"
In response to Reply # 22


  

          

<----

Soundcloud.com/aquil84

(HIP HOP)
http://aquil.bandcamp.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

        
c71
Member since Jan 15th 2008
10657 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 08:10 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
29. "ahem, you really are going off the deep end"
In response to Reply # 28


  

          

I'm 43 and there's been more than enough media exposure of Stokely for people of my generation to be well aware of him.


Who do you think you are? Somebody who did an archeological dig somewhere and unearthed hidden historical facts?

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

            
Musa
Member since Mar 08th 2006
15261 posts
Fri Jan-09-15 08:30 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
30. "This film ain't for you dummy"
In response to Reply # 29


  

          

This film is for those that don't know any better aka young impressionable minds.

Nothing deep about writing Black power out of history. I'm surprised at how lazy you old niggas are in not calling it out.

<----

Soundcloud.com/aquil84

(HIP HOP)
http://aquil.bandcamp.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Hitokiri
Charter member
20473 posts
Sun Jan-11-15 11:23 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
39. "No. But I thought that Andew Young looked a whole lot like him."
In response to Reply # 22


  

          

At first I was like... wait... is that...

--
"You can't beat white people. You can only knock them out."

"There is only one god and his name is death. And there is only one thing we say to death: not today."

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Riot
Member since May 25th 2005
14589 posts
Sun Jan-11-15 01:04 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy listClick to send message via AOL IM
31. "free tix for nyc teenagers Jan 8-19th"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://variety.com/2015/film/news/selma-offered-for-free-to-nyc-students-1201394656/



)))--####---###--(((

bunda
<-.-> ^_^ \^0^/
get busy living, or get busy dying.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

illegal
Charter member
78380 posts
Sun Jan-11-15 01:32 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
32. "Ava DuVernay is REAL fine to me."
In response to Reply # 0


          

***
when I come around, they frown
then wanna dap me down
but when I leave?

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Chicane
Member since Feb 05th 2010
369 posts
Sun Jan-11-15 04:09 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
33. "Beautiful woman."
In response to Reply # 32


  

          

__________________
Okayplaying since '00

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
DavidHasselhoff
Charter member
11401 posts
Sun Jan-11-15 04:49 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
34. "She is sexy"
In response to Reply # 32


          

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
Dr Claw
Member since Jun 25th 2003
130071 posts
Sun Jan-11-15 06:19 PM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy listClick to send message via AOL IM
37. "I agree."
In response to Reply # 32


  

          

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Musa
Member since Mar 08th 2006
15261 posts
Sun Jan-11-15 11:17 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
38. "Great documentary on civil rights movement and Selma"
In response to Reply # 0
Sun Jan-11-15 11:23 PM by Musa

  

          

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2K4xU4Gr6CA

<----

Soundcloud.com/aquil84

(HIP HOP)
http://aquil.bandcamp.com

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Hitokiri
Charter member
20473 posts
Sun Jan-11-15 11:33 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
40. "I thought it was very good. And I thought some other things too. [spoile..."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Very interesting to start with the Birmingham church bombing. That was powerful. But not necessarily central to the story they choose to tell. I smiled so hard though listening to them talk about hair.

David Oyelowo was great as King in my opinion. But I still would've rather seen Craig Robinson as MLK.

The SNCC side story was very interesting to see taking place in the periphery. I would've liked to see more of that.

Carmen Ejogo is fine as shit. She did a good job as Coretta and was well cast.

I was pretty disappointed in the centrality of white involvement. Especially when I thought about what could've been shown instead. Ie Malcolm's speech.

The violence was powerful. It was real. It was heartbreaking. Jimmy Jackson's grandfather was the most difficult scene for me.

--
"You can't beat white people. You can only knock them out."

"There is only one god and his name is death. And there is only one thing we say to death: not today."

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Riot
Member since May 25th 2005
14589 posts
Mon Jan-12-15 10:54 AM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy listClick to send message via AOL IM
41. "link to louisiana literacy test"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

http://www.crmvet.org/info/la-test.htm

i got one wrong



)))--####---###--(((

bunda
<-.-> ^_^ \^0^/
get busy living, or get busy dying.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Lobby General Discussion topic #12647560 Previous topic | Next topic
Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.25
Copyright © DCScripts.com