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Subject: "2007 reading list: leave no author unturned, no book unrecommended" This topic is locked.
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Darryl_Licke
Member since Jun 06th 2002
70279 posts
Wed Dec-27-06 08:35 PM

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"2007 reading list: leave no author unturned, no book unrecommended"


  

          

Right. Since I've given up cable now for close to 6 months if not a little more I've got A LOT of free time. I need to read. So I need suggestions to read to give my brain a break from all the techinical programming reading I'm going to have to do this year as well. Somethings I've already planned:

all the books the author of freakonomics wrote.
octavia butler RIP
finish the speak for the dead series
all of Robert Greene's books (starting with the art of seduction cause my dick is dry <--- that was humor)

and your suggestions. so give em to me...as many as you can.

but there is nothing wrong with being odd. i mean you arent inkast or adwhizz odd. - VABestBBW
Binlahab is a bitch.
I wouldn't trust okp, some of them don't even get any anymore since the Re's stopped - Anonymous OKP

  

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Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
I'll recommend Cloud Atlas before janey has the chance.
Dec 27th 2006
1
gotta co-sign this
Dec 28th 2006
2
for the sports peeps: The Blind Side by Michael Lewis
Dec 28th 2006
3
You're not joking at all, huh? Is it actually good? Don't lie.
Dec 29th 2006
15
      i like the book a lot
Dec 31st 2006
43
           You should really read "How Tracy Austin Broke My Heart"
Dec 31st 2006
45
                Have you read the tennis essay in
Dec 31st 2006
46
                     Yeah, I agree about the collection, but...
Dec 31st 2006
48
                          chrue
Jan 03rd 2007
73
my resolution is to read more
Dec 28th 2006
4
For short stories:
Dec 28th 2006
7
      I just bought ZZ Packer
Dec 29th 2006
17
I think Stephen Levitt is a great big fraud
Dec 28th 2006
5
my favorite books of 2006
Dec 28th 2006
6
fuck
Dec 28th 2006
8
i always feel in over my head with the readers on here but...
Dec 28th 2006
9
did you read The Polysyllabic Spree?
Dec 28th 2006
10
i totally agree...
Dec 28th 2006
13
      xxoo
Dec 29th 2006
21
           i'll have to check it out.
Dec 29th 2006
25
                lmao
Dec 29th 2006
28
                     i think his introduction to 'hvd' is meant for them as well.
Dec 29th 2006
31
and p.s.
Dec 28th 2006
12
I'm going to up this but since janey said search her name
Dec 28th 2006
11
Pick up some Raymond Carver
Dec 29th 2006
14
I just started reading Joan Didion again, I wish more people would
Dec 29th 2006
16
lol fuck you I was reading Didion before you were born
Dec 29th 2006
22
      Yeah well why'd you let everyone else stop reading it?
Dec 29th 2006
29
           My favorite is actually The Book of Common Prayer
Dec 29th 2006
32
                Yeah, I can see that -- some of her stuff is transcendent though
Dec 30th 2006
37
i'm reading posts on OKP
Dec 29th 2006
18
i know, write!
Dec 29th 2006
19
damn, i need to read A LOT more.
Dec 29th 2006
20
and nick hornby
Dec 29th 2006
23
that's him
Dec 29th 2006
24
his non-fiction too!
Dec 29th 2006
26
      fever pitch didn't do a whole lot for me
Dec 29th 2006
27
           i must seem like a fanboy.
Dec 29th 2006
30
                yeah, you know, he's one of those conversational writers
Dec 29th 2006
33
                     i'll definitely add that to my list.
Dec 29th 2006
34
                          I know! It's like for 40 years I ONLY read fiction
Dec 29th 2006
35
                               when i was in high school...
Dec 29th 2006
36
for the people:
Dec 30th 2006
38
what be this?
Jan 03rd 2007
70
oh!
Dec 30th 2006
39
Haruki Murakami
Dec 31st 2006
40
I was able to attend his first and (probably) last press conference
Jan 03rd 2007
63
The Road, by Cormac McCarthy
Dec 31st 2006
41
RE: 2007 reading list: leave no author unturned, no book unrecommended
Dec 31st 2006
42
Anything by Christopher Moore
Dec 31st 2006
44
Just picked up The Last Samurai and Cloud Atlas
Dec 31st 2006
47
I heartily approve, lol
Jan 02nd 2007
49
      I'm reading Drama City right now
Jan 02nd 2007
51
           I liked Drama City but he hit a groove with Right As Rain
Jan 02nd 2007
53
           I read a few more chapters at lunch
Jan 02nd 2007
56
                is this your first Pelecanos?
Jan 02nd 2007
58
                     I've read some Lehane
Jan 02nd 2007
59
                          Samaritan
Jan 03rd 2007
66
                               I concur. n/m
Jan 08th 2007
81
           I thought Drama City was great...
Jan 08th 2007
82
I really like the Charlie Huston trilogy of
Jan 02nd 2007
50
the people of paper by salvador plascenscia and
Jan 02nd 2007
52
RE: the people of paper by salvador plascenscia
Jan 03rd 2007
60
a book a week...
Jan 02nd 2007
54
I just ordered that Randall Kennedy book
Jan 02nd 2007
55
if you read Gravity's Rainbow in a week, you're a beast
Jan 03rd 2007
61
I'm reading 'Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs' right now
Jan 02nd 2007
57
just finished Lunar Park thanks to my 3 day binge
Jan 03rd 2007
62
honestly, I'm at a point
Jan 03rd 2007
69
      RE: honestly, I'm at a point
Jan 03rd 2007
71
           I like Rules of Attraction a lot
Jan 03rd 2007
72
                and i'll definitely be rereading that
Jan 03rd 2007
74
                     this is funny
Jan 03rd 2007
75
                          i think i might seriously go through and highlight certain lines that i ...
Jan 03rd 2007
76
                               Chapter titles alone can keep me in stitches
Jan 03rd 2007
77
                                    oh? Like......"Brings Uzi to Gym"? Lol
Jan 03rd 2007
78
                                         or "Tries to Cook and Eat Girl"
Jan 03rd 2007
79
I'm telling ya'll "Beasts Of No Nation"
Jan 03rd 2007
64
alright janey...
Jan 03rd 2007
65
Perdido Street Station, by China Mieville
Jan 03rd 2007
67
cant go wrong with The Count Of Monte Cristo
Jan 03rd 2007
68
just started two that are great so far...
Jan 08th 2007
80
I've been thinking about buying the audiobook.
Jan 08th 2007
83
i've never listened to an audio book
Jan 08th 2007
85
Me neither, actually!
Jan 08th 2007
89
      If I hadn't already read it,
Jan 08th 2007
90
I have the soundtrack for Hard Revolution if you want it
Jan 08th 2007
86
      Yeah, I already have that. Thanks, tho'. lol - n/m
Jan 08th 2007
88
kitchen confidential is dope
Jun 05th 2007
100
so that damn book of best american essays
Jan 08th 2007
84
is that the 'best non-required reading for 2006' thing?
Jan 08th 2007
87
      No, although I have that as well
Jan 08th 2007
91
'The Professor's Daughter' - Emily Raboteau n/m
Jan 09th 2007
92
I just ordered 'Love Is A Mix Tape' by Rob Sheffield
Jan 09th 2007
93
RE: 2007 reading list: leave no author unturned, no book unrecommended
Jan 10th 2007
94
Let us know what you think about Corrections
Jan 10th 2007
96
things i've read recently...
Jan 10th 2007
95
3 Nights in August - Buzz Billinger
Jan 10th 2007
97
Up for the 6 month summer update
Jun 05th 2007
98
I've read everything Octavia E. Butler has written. What's first of hers
Jun 05th 2007
99
wild seed, dawn, adulthood rites
Jun 05th 2007
103
      let me know what you think about them ...
Jun 06th 2007
104
RE: 2007 reading list: leave no author unturned, no book unrecommended
Jun 05th 2007
101
have you read the archived thread on Everything is Illuminated?
Jun 05th 2007
102
      i didn't know there was one.
Jun 06th 2007
105
           I re-read it yesterday
Jun 06th 2007
106
                that was a good thread.
Jun 06th 2007
107
                     I should clarify
Jun 07th 2007
108
                          i almost
Jun 07th 2007
109

okaycomputer
Member since Dec 02nd 2002
8090 posts
Wed Dec-27-06 08:49 PM

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1. "I'll recommend Cloud Atlas before janey has the chance."
In response to Reply # 0


          

If you haven't read it, do so quickly, you won't be sorry.

  

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jasonprague
Member since Sep 29th 2005
1900 posts
Thu Dec-28-06 07:18 AM

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2. " gotta co-sign this"
In response to Reply # 1


          

the story structure is unorthodox but once you get into it you really get into it. how that didnt win the Booker amazes me...


PEACE

"The struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting." - Kundera

  

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bshelly
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71730 posts
Thu Dec-28-06 07:38 AM

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3. "for the sports peeps: The Blind Side by Michael Lewis"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Really well done take on the development and critical importance of the left tackle position in football juxtaposed with the inspiring but somewhat disturbing tale of how a inner city Memphis kid was adopted by rich white family and became a five star prospect.

----
bshelly

"You (Fisher) could get fired, Les Snead could get fired, Kevin Demoff could get fired, but I will always be Eric Dickerson.” (c) The God

  

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celery77
Member since Aug 04th 2005
25307 posts
Fri Dec-29-06 02:28 AM

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15. "You're not joking at all, huh? Is it actually good? Don't lie."
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

sidenote -- have you ever read the David Foster Wallace essay "How Tracy Austin Broke My Heart" about sports writing? I found it in his last essay collection, Consider the Lobster. Anyway, it wasn't just a good summary of why sports writing sucks, it's actually one of the more interesting insights I've seen into the psychology of athletes. Ever since I read it, I've (1) been wary of any and all writing by athletes and (2) thought about it all the time when I think about sports.

You should check it if you haven't.

___________

HOPE!
https://vine.co/v/i7JjIBL3Qix
https://vine.co/v/i7JtqEFwxDu

  

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bshelly
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71730 posts
Sun Dec-31-06 09:06 AM

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43. "i like the book a lot"
In response to Reply # 15


  

          

but i liked moneyball a lot too. if you didn't like that michael lewis probably isn't for you. he gets a little carried away, and subtlty isn't his strong point. but it's a page turner and it is informative.

then again, i hate david foster wallace with a passion(1) so we may not agree on his

(1) David Foster Wallace sucks, and the footnote thing is incredibly, incredibly retarded.

----
bshelly

"You (Fisher) could get fired, Les Snead could get fired, Kevin Demoff could get fired, but I will always be Eric Dickerson.” (c) The God

  

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celery77
Member since Aug 04th 2005
25307 posts
Sun Dec-31-06 12:38 PM

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45. "You should really read "How Tracy Austin Broke My Heart""
In response to Reply # 43


  

          

its light on footnotes if I remember and its rather brief. Next time youre in a bookstore, just pick up a copy of Consider the Lobster and read it real quick. I dunno, maybe youll find the comment on sports psychology flat, but I thought it was interesting (it relates to winning and the necessary mindset to handle pressure).

___________

HOPE!
https://vine.co/v/i7JjIBL3Qix
https://vine.co/v/i7JtqEFwxDu

  

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janey
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123120 posts
Sun Dec-31-06 02:16 PM

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46. "Have you read the tennis essay in"
In response to Reply # 45


  

          

A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again?

That's probably, in some respects, the precursor. And that's a great essay collection. I love Consider the Lobster, but I think A Supposely Fun Thing is even better.

  

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celery77
Member since Aug 04th 2005
25307 posts
Sun Dec-31-06 07:22 PM

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48. "Yeah, I agree about the collection, but..."
In response to Reply # 46


  

          

the tennis essay in that one didn't seem to be so much about sports to me, as it was about the misconception that you can learn, study, and control the world you live in.

Bah -- I'm too lazy to type out a real coherent thing right now, but yeah -- that collection is better, but as a sports fan, I think bshelly would like the Tracy Austin essay whether he liked DFW or not.

___________

HOPE!
https://vine.co/v/i7JjIBL3Qix
https://vine.co/v/i7JtqEFwxDu

  

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janey
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123120 posts
Wed Jan-03-07 05:35 PM

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73. "chrue"
In response to Reply # 48


  

          

I thought his essay on the effect of television on American fiction was excellent.

But I'm such a big fan of his. I read Shipping Out* when it appeared in Harpers, long before I knew who he was, and I was halfway through Infinite Jest before I realized that they were written by the same guy.

And that essay in Consider the Lobster about the porn convention just had me in stitches.

*the title on original publication of the essay we know as A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again

  

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dro
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7201 posts
Thu Dec-28-06 08:13 AM

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4. "my resolution is to read more"
In response to Reply # 0
Thu Dec-28-06 08:15 AM by dro

  

          

instead of spending my time dicking around on the internet.

but i took a short story class this past semester, and think i kind of prefer those (sometimes) to novels, so i think i'm gonna go to barnes and noble and use up my giftcard i got for xmas on Borges' "Ficciones" and Donald Barthalme's "40 stories." I had never heard of Barthalme before, but his story "the school" that we read seemed so ahead of its time in diction, structure, content, etc. (he wrote most of his good stuff between 1950s-70s, i think) that when our professor didn't tell us who the author was at first, i was going to guess dave eggers, who ironically is the editor of 40 stories, i think.

i also plan to cop hunter s. thompson's "the great shark hunt," a collection of a lot of his journalism.

peace
mike

http://theonlyblogthatmatters.wordpress.com
http://www.last.fm/user/mdrohan/

  

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janey
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123120 posts
Thu Dec-28-06 04:34 PM

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7. "For short stories:"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

Andre Dubus (sr.)
Amy Hempel
Julie Orringer
Richard Yates

^^^strongly recommended

  

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2nd2Nun
Member since Oct 27th 2004
783 posts
Fri Dec-29-06 09:05 AM

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17. "I just bought ZZ Packer"
In response to Reply # 7


  

          

Another great set of short stories.

_____________
kimnunley.com
@kimnunley

  

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janey
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123120 posts
Thu Dec-28-06 02:19 PM

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5. "I think Stephen Levitt is a great big fraud"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

If you like that stuff, try A Mathematician Reads The Newspaper, instead.

You can also run a search for my name as author and you'll get a lot of book threads.

Here are my all time favorites, but there are other worthy books out there, too, like this one I'm reading now, Man Gone Down....


Fiction

The Goldbug Variations, by Richard Powers (or maybe Plowing the Dark)

What's great about Powers is that he always takes more than one story line, usually seemingly unconnected, and ultimately binds them together really strongly and deeply. His first book, Three Farmers On Their Way To A Dance, is a good example of this. So is Plowing the Dark.

Sometimes it's not directly two different story lines but different times in the same story, but times so far removed that they seem irreconcilable. Gold Bug Variations is a good example of this.

Sometimes he takes the same story and emphasizes different aspects of it. Well, okay, here I'm thinking of The Time of Our Singing and the themes of music and race, but this one could also fall into either of the preceding categories.

So he makes you see how disparate ideas and seemingly unconnected stories all work together.

I sometimes feel as though reading his work enriches my life because he gives words to intuitions that I've had that I haven't had words for. Sometimes I think he has identified emotions or responses that I felt but couldn't articulate. So I actually believe that I am a more whole person emotionally than I was before I started reading his writing, and that is an extremely unusual experience for me with respect to a novelist. I think mostly what I get from books is recognizable and known emotion, or imparted intelligence/knowledge. I don't think any other writer has actually enriched my life in this way.

The Sparrow, by Mary Doria Russell

Russell is an anthropologist and a cradle Catholic who converted to Judaism. She wanted to write about the meeting of two cultures that have nothing in common and the role of faith in such a meeting and the only way she could do this is to set her book in the future and include space travel, because every culture on Earth is permeated by Gap and Starbucks. So she brings her anthropology background and her thoughtful exploration of faith to this, her first (and best) novel. The story is fun (including the idea that the only organization with the will and the funds to undertake space exploration is the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits), who have a long and dark history of exploration already, lol) and compelling (and beautiful and ugly and sad and uplifting and a lot of things), but what's really going on here is the question of the role of God in one's life, and what does it mean to your faith if you feel as though you have been abandoned by God. It's a kind of modern day Dark Night of the Soul, but it completely sneaks up on you.

The Names of the Dead, by Stewart O'Nan

This is the first book I ever read that made me think that Vietnam War lit would have anything to add to my life. This is the story of a man in search of himself, a man struggling to be a good man and a whole man and a good father and so forth, and also struggling to assimilate or work through his experiences in Vietnam. It also has aspects of thriller/mystery, which keeps the plot moving along.

The Human Stain, by Philip Roth

I could never quite get why people raved so much about Roth until I read The Human Stain. It has passages of some of the best writing I've read in recent years, and it's sad and it's thought-provoking and it's funny. The film could never match the book because of the nature of film. The book is written from a particular point of view -- the perennial Zuckerman, who looks at Coleman Silk and thinks about how Silk's life happened to move in the paths that it did. This is a FAR cry from just telling Silk's story, which the film more or less purports to do. In the book Zuckerman is always saying to himself things like: So I thought about what it would have been like or what would have motivated him.... And that makes it very moving in a really quiet and lovely way. But there are also just hysterically funny passages. And the characters are drawn so vividly. There are other books of Roth's that I like a lot, but to my mind nothing measures up to this.

Cloud Atlas, by David Mitchell

This book is like those Russian nested dolls. You open one and there's another, and you open that, and there's another one. Cloud Atlas is six nested stories, all different genres, all very lightly connected thematically. Story A begins and abruptly stops in the middle, and then Story B begins and, again, abruptly stops halfway through. Same with C, D and E. Then you get all of Story F, then the last half of Stories E, D, C, B, and A. Sounds gimmicky and very complicated. And yes, it's a gimmick, but it works. And yes, it's complicated but the stories are so different that they're easy to keep track of.

So then, past the structure, the substance of the book is really remarkable. It's about bondage and freedom and how we bind ourselves and how others enslave us and where true freedom lies. And there are portions of it that are really so beautiful and sad that you'll cry. There aren't a whole lot of books that make me cry, although I think every one that exists is on this list.

The Last Samurai, by Helen DeWitt

Not about Japan and only about samurais in the respect that the son uses Seven Samurai as a model for searching for his father.

It's about what makes a worthwhile life or a life worth living.

And it's about the value of granting an individual autonomy over his/her own existence and what, if anything, we can responsibly do to aid a person who is in distress without compromising their autonomy.

And it's about what it means to look for your father, and who is a father, and what is it to have a father.

And it's about brilliance and the limitations of brilliance.

The Known World, by Edward P. Jones

Again, a book with interwoven plot lines and shifting times. Apparently this structure works for me. The writing is magnificent and the story is heartbreaking. It's a family saga, but it's not like any you have ever read before. In part because the story deals with Black families who owned slaves around the time of the Civil War. It is haunting and beautiful and dreamlike and razor-sharp.

The Secret History, by Donna Tartt

This one is strange. I don't exactly know how it fits into this list. I'm not even sure exactly what it is that makes me love this book so much. Maybe it's because it evokes the environment of my own college experience so well even if the events are so dramatically different. If you read this and like it, I also recommend Bret Easton Ellis's book The Rules of Attraction. There are a lot of connections between the two, including some rather direct allusions in The Rules of Attraction to people and events in The Secret History, and there is some thought that Ellis helped Tartt write her book much in the way that Capote helped Harper Lee. Tartt of course denies this vehemently, but I still believe it.

The Map of Love, by Ahdaf Soueif

This is another book that tells more than one story and winds it together perfectly. Here, it's two love stories that take place years apart in Egypt. One is the story of a British woman at the turn of the century and the Egyptian man she falls in love with, and the other is the story of her great-granddaughter, a New Yorker, who falls in love with an Egyptian man in about the late 1990s. They're tied together by a third woman, Egyptian, who is observer and narrator and translator, and whose life we see in part as well. The backdrop of the love stories is the political climate in Egypt and the various difficulties of the Middle East vs. the West, especially as reflected in interpersonal relationships.


Non Fiction

Causing Death and Saving Lives, by Jonathon Glover

Glover is a moral philosopher with excellent credentials. This book raises the question, first, whether we can consciously and intentionally create a coherent moral philosophy about killing. In other words, is morality rational? and Is it possible to have a non-contradictory moral philosophy on this question?

Then he discusses how such a philosophy would be grounded. Like, do we object to killing on the basis of "sanctity of life"? on a sense that killing is *always* inherently wrong? on a belief that killing is wrong but can be outweighed by other principles (and if so, what would those principles be?) or on the basis of a general principle that it is better to increase happiness in the world? or on other principles?

Then he applies the question to various issues surrounding killing, ranging from: war, assassination, capital punishment, abortion, contraception, infanticide, euthanasia, suicide, you name it.

It is mind blowing. And engaging. And completely accessible. I STRONGLY recommend it. Not because he tells you what to think, not at ALL. He just describes ways of thinking and then tests them for contradictions and for utility.

And these issues are very important. It's true that most of us don't have to come face to face with many of the practical questions he raises, like for instance, I don't have to myself wonder whether I should be a conscientious objector if drafted to serve in a war. On the other hand, we all hold opinions on all of these questions, and it is good for us, as human beings, to think through all of our opinions to see where they lead and how strongly we hold them.

Mountains Beyond Mountains, by Tracy Kidder

The biography of Paul Farmer. Farmer is a doctor (specialist in infectious diseases) and anthropologist who has undertaken the treatment of AIDS in Haiti and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis in Russia (and elsewhere), and who looks at disease as social/cultural ill and poverty as the single most significant factor in healthcare issues. He makes a powerful case in his own writings for a radically new picture of the politics of health and the allocation of resources, and this book is a great introduction to him and his writings, because he tends to disappear in his own books. His own story is very much worth reading. He scoffs at the idea of "sustainable" programs (i.e., AIDS prevention to the detriment of AIDS treatment) and just tackles what is in front of him with all his force and determination. In the offices of his non-profit org, one of his co-workers has a little sign posted that says "If Paul is the model, we're fucked." And that's a good reminder. I mean, this book could totally inspire you or it could make you throw your hands in the air and think that if you can't give everything, the way the Farmer does, there's no point in trying. But Farmer, via Kidder, would say with Gandhi that everything you do will be insignificant, but it is very important that you do it.

Love Thy Neighbor, by Peter Maas

I'd already been reading about genocide when I ran across an essay by Maas in The New Killing Fields, and I was so shaken by some of the things he wrote that I immediately sought out and read this one. It ranks among the most moving accounts of current issues, right up there with We Wish To Inform You That Tomorrow We Will Be Killed With Our Families.

War Is A Force That Gives Us Meaning, by Chris Hedges

Hedges is a really interesting guy. He did most of a theology graduate degree at Harvard Divinity School and then became completely disillusioned and became a war correspondent. So he thinks and writes about issues from a perspective that most war correspondents don't have. This short book helps frame the issue that my cat Boo keeps asking about: Why is there war?

White Like Me, by Tim Wise

Wise is a hero of mine and his columns (available at www.timwise.org and his recent article on PETA at http://www.lipmagazine.org/~timwise/animalwhites.html ) are incredibly smart, sharp and insightful. His thinking is really clear and he articulates his message powerfully even while he writes in a remarkably accessible manner. White Like Me crystallized a lot of my own thinking and put concepts into words for me in ways that I can get my arms around. I think this is one of the best books on white privilege out there (and there are more and more every day, thank God). He writes about his own history and that of his family and he doesn't pull any punches on any of them. I think it's really important for white people to know that there are in fact other white people who are committed to social change and to have someone like Wise as a role model.

  

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janey
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123120 posts
Thu Dec-28-06 03:29 PM

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6. "my favorite books of 2006"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

The Zero, by Jess Walter

The Echo Maker, by Richard Powers

Black Swan Green, by David Mitchell

Cross-X, by Joe Mitchell

Everyman, by Philip Roth

Saturday, by Ian McEwan

What Is The What, by Dave Eggers & Valentino Achak Deng

The Omnivore's Dilemma, by Michael Pollen

  

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janey
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Thu Dec-28-06 04:38 PM

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8. "fuck"
In response to Reply # 6


  

          

Cross X is by Joe MILLER not Joe Mitchell, sorry kids

  

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WhiteNotion
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Thu Dec-28-06 06:43 PM

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9. "i always feel in over my head with the readers on here but..."
In response to Reply # 0


          

in the past few months, i can recommend a few that i really enjoyed.

Non-Fiction

The First American: The Life and Times of Benjamin Franklin by H.M. Brand - this was the first biography that i had read in a long time and i really enjoyed it. it's definitely an in depth look at franklin, but with a figure like franklin, even a seemingly in depth look only scratches the surface. it is written very well and reads fairly easily.

Blink by Malcolm Gladwell - it took me a while to get around to reading this, but i'm glad i finally did. i didn't enjoy it in the same way that i enjoyed the tipping point. i really enjoy how gladwell brings academia to the everyman. it's an easy weekend read, but even better for the toilet.

Housekeeping vs. The Dirt by Nick Hornby - this is the second set of his writings in Believer. i enjoy hornby's fiction, but i like his non-fiction even better. there is something endearing about him that makes me like him, even if i disagree with him. also, his non-fiction makes me like his fiction even more. as an added bonus, all of the articles are about what hornby has been reading, so you'll probably come out of it with at least a few more additions to your "to read" list.

Fiction

Manhattan Loverboy by Arthur Nersesian - i had read a few other things by nersesian (most notably, the fuck-up) and i really enjoyed them. all of his tales seem to be about the old new york hip and how they are dealing with the effects of gentrification. this is good, but read "the fuck-up" first if you're not familiar with his work. it's a little less fantastic, which is a good thing.

i'm always a bit intimidated by the ptp book posts, mostly because janey is the most well-read person i semi-know about, but i can recommend all of these books. also, we should start one of those book shipping clubs. the type where you send a book to the next person on the list and what not. that way we can recommend new books to people and have someone to talk with about them afterwards.

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janey
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Thu Dec-28-06 07:05 PM

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10. "did you read The Polysyllabic Spree?"
In response to Reply # 9


  

          

I think I like that better than Housekeeping vs. the Dirt. I felt like I learned about more Must Read Books in the PS than in the second one.

From The Polysyllabic Spree I got Random Family and How To Breathe Underwater, both of which were stunning.

From H vs the D, I only got one or two, none of which were so great, although he did mention Citizen Vince after I'd read it, and that's a great great book.

You?

  

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WhiteNotion
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Thu Dec-28-06 11:14 PM

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13. "i totally agree..."
In response to Reply # 10
Thu Dec-28-06 11:21 PM by WhiteNotion

          

i actually read david copperfield after reading the excerpt in ps. i had only read 'tale of two cities' in grade school and hated it, but decided a non-academic approach to dickens might do me better. it definitely did. i kind of felt as though hornby was reaching in 'h.v.d.,' as if he felt he had something to prove. his critiques were much critic-ier as opposed to the everyday approach of ps. i'm not exactly sure why that happened. maybe his success as a non-fiction writer began to rise at that time, i'm not really sure. but i have to agree with you on liking ps better than h.v.d. do you know if he wrote more articles in the believer after that? will there be another volume?

also, i know you don't mean to be intimidating. believe me, you are far from pretentious. you're just well-read, which is something i can respect. if anything, it makes me want to read more, just so i can hold my own. i've got nothing but love.

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janey
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Fri Dec-29-06 11:59 AM

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21. "xxoo"
In response to Reply # 13


  

          

He continues to write the column, and you can often or usually access the whole thing monthly on the Believer website if you don't want to spring for the mag. I like The Believer SO much better than McSweeney's. I actually read parts of it, lol. There was a great analysis of the photos from Abu Ghraib a year or so ago, that NEVER would have been published by McSweeney's. Also, there was an interview with China Mieville at one point that is directly responsible for me reading Perdido Street Station, which is amazing (although I'm not as crazy about the two that follow).

The website is www.believermag.com -- that "mag" is so important. Leave it out and all you get are religious websites, lol.

  

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WhiteNotion
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25. "i'll have to check it out."
In response to Reply # 21


          

i've only picked up mcsweeney's once and could not muster the strength to get through it. there's something about it that screams, "read this and you will lose your childhood." i may be an old child, but i refuse to lose it to mcsweeney.

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janey
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Fri Dec-29-06 06:30 PM

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28. "lmao"
In response to Reply # 25


  

          

I always think it screams "Look how SMART we are!" That's actually one of the charms of Hornby's What I've Been Reading column -- all those pseudo-snarky remarks about the Spree and their bizarre rituals. Living in the town that houses Eggers & Co., at 826 Valencia, I'm prone to believing in the literal existence of the 48 -- or is it 84? -- veiled banshees wailing SYLVIA PLAAAAAAATH at morning ablutions....

  

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WhiteNotion
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Fri Dec-29-06 08:02 PM

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31. "i think his introduction to 'hvd' is meant for them as well."
In response to Reply # 28


          

he seems to blast the literary elite (possibly in defense of his own work?) for their attitude towards "lesser" fiction. does this make him the equivalent of a literary hipster? is the bestseller list the new hip?

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janey
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Thu Dec-28-06 08:46 PM

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12. "and p.s."
In response to Reply # 9


  

          

I don't mean to be intimidating on book posts, not at all. I like it if I know enough about the books that people post about to be able to engage with them about the books, and yeah, I read a lot, but I'm NOT trying to show off or pretend to be smart. I just like chattering about the books.

  

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Darryl_Licke
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Thu Dec-28-06 08:00 PM

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11. "I'm going to up this but since janey said search her name"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I'm going to and make my own damn list. One you should read too.

but there is nothing wrong with being odd. i mean you arent inkast or adwhizz odd. - VABestBBW
Binlahab is a bitch.
I wouldn't trust okp, some of them don't even get any anymore since the Re's stopped - Anonymous OKP

  

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crow
Member since Feb 23rd 2005
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Fri Dec-29-06 02:18 AM

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14. "Pick up some Raymond Carver"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I love his work.

__________________________________

*Note to self: Add Sig*

  

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celery77
Member since Aug 04th 2005
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Fri Dec-29-06 02:33 AM

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16. "I just started reading Joan Didion again, I wish more people would"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I seriously haven't met a single person in real life who's read Didion without me forcing it on them. The fuck is wrong with people?

Read Slouching Towards Bethlehem, a collection of essays from the 1960s. It's blindingly brilliant. I'm finally getting to some of her fiction, and all her talent is still there, but it's really her non-fiction that I'm in love with. So yeah, read that shit yo.

___________

HOPE!
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janey
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Fri Dec-29-06 12:01 PM

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22. "lol fuck you I was reading Didion before you were born"
In response to Reply # 16


  

          

lol

I spent the entire summer of 1979 reading Play It As It Lays over and over and over, lol

  

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celery77
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Fri Dec-29-06 06:47 PM

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29. "Yeah well why'd you let everyone else stop reading it?"
In response to Reply # 22


  

          

Ain't nobody told me to READ this shit, I had to fucking FIND it.

So FUCK your mute ass, spread the love!

___________

HOPE!
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janey
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Fri Dec-29-06 08:05 PM

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32. "My favorite is actually The Book of Common Prayer"
In response to Reply # 29


  

          

although you can't beat her essays, I admit that. But one thing we need to acknowledge about her is that she's very ethnocentric and class-centric without realizing it, so she just isn't going to speak to every reader. That's especially evident in Where I Was From, I think, but a number of readers here really felt hit over the head with it in The Year of Magical Thinking, which to my mind is incredible, but to other people, not so much.

  

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celery77
Member since Aug 04th 2005
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Sat Dec-30-06 03:17 PM

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37. "Yeah, I can see that -- some of her stuff is transcendent though"
In response to Reply # 32


  

          

I mean about the ethnocentrism and classism and stuff, yeah, that's definitely true, but some of the stuff she wrote in her essays are emblematic of a certain experience, and everyone would learn and be exposed to something very real and very true if they read it.

___________

HOPE!
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Galatasaray
Member since May 11th 2006
14229 posts
Fri Dec-29-06 09:23 AM

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18. "i'm reading posts on OKP"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

that's about it

  

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WhiteNotion
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Fri Dec-29-06 09:25 AM

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19. "i know, write!"
In response to Reply # 18


          

i don't need no book. them for suckers.

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Commie
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Fri Dec-29-06 09:35 AM

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20. "damn, i need to read A LOT more."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

especially some of these newer books.
for the past 2 years or so, I've been reading for school only.
cept the two Chuck Klosterman books that came out since then,
which is going to be my recommendation.

"IV" and "Killing Yourself to Live"- chuck klosterman.

**************************************
dominus vobiscum

http://dnlbcknr.tumblr.com
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Darryl_Licke
Member since Jun 06th 2002
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Fri Dec-29-06 12:03 PM

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23. "and nick hornby"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

or whoever wrote high fidelity....all his books.

but there is nothing wrong with being odd. i mean you arent inkast or adwhizz odd. - VABestBBW
Binlahab is a bitch.
I wouldn't trust okp, some of them don't even get any anymore since the Re's stopped - Anonymous OKP

  

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janey
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Fri Dec-29-06 03:38 PM

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24. "that's him"
In response to Reply # 23


  

          

About A Boy and High Fidelity are way better than How To Be Good. A Long Way Down is somewhere between -- better than How To Be Good, not as good as the first two.

  

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WhiteNotion
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Fri Dec-29-06 05:19 PM

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26. "his non-fiction too!"
In response to Reply # 23


          

songbook
fever pitch
the polysyllabic spree
housekeeping vs. dirt

the latter two are for the hornby junkies, but the former are great for any taste.

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janey
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Fri Dec-29-06 06:27 PM

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27. "fever pitch didn't do a whole lot for me"
In response to Reply # 26


  

          

I thought after reading About A Boy that he could keep my interest in soccer, but....

but that's okay!

  

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WhiteNotion
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Fri Dec-29-06 07:54 PM

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30. "i must seem like a fanboy."
In response to Reply # 27


          

maybe i am. i think i owe it all to my experience with hornby. i read high fidelity a long, long time ago. this was probably right around the time that about a boy came out. i enjoyed it, but wasn't exactly a "reader" at that time, so i didn't bother to pick up about a boy. then, out of the blue, i picked up high fidelity again years later and realized how much i enjoyed it. i subsequently read everything i could get my hands on. this was right before long way down came out, so it was pretty much his entire current catalogue. i think he's got the type of voice that you appreciate no matter what he writes if you really get used to it. so when you read him in large quantities, you really start to enjoy it. this may be true with all authors, i'm not sure, but i think that's largely the reason why i liked fever pitch so much. moreover, for being a book about a sport that i don't watch, it far surpassed expectations.

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janey
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Fri Dec-29-06 08:07 PM

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33. "yeah, you know, he's one of those conversational writers"
In response to Reply # 30


  

          

I don't know if you saw me mention The Omnivore's Dilemma, and I don't mean to compare Pollan and Hornby *exactly*, but one of the best things about Ominivore was that it was like having a conversation with some interesting friend who just suddenly became slightly fascinated with food production. It's incredibly readable.

  

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WhiteNotion
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Fri Dec-29-06 08:13 PM

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34. "i'll definitely add that to my list."
In response to Reply # 33


          

i've been on a huge non-fiction kick lately and that style makes it go down much easier. it's especially useful with normally difficult topics. the first thing that comes to mind is richard rhodes's the making of the atomic bomb. his infatuation with the topic and conversational voice combined to make even the most difficult of physics seem like child's play, and that's coming from someone who hasn't taken a science class in several years.

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janey
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Fri Dec-29-06 08:32 PM

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35. "I know! It's like for 40 years I ONLY read fiction"
In response to Reply # 34


  

          

and now I can't stop reading non fiction. lol

I'm a huge fan of Mark Dow & David Dow (they're brothers) because they write about really important topics and do it in an accessible and engaging way.

And then, for example, I love and respect Lewis Lapham and godDAMN if I can't read a single paragraph of his without kind of blurring out, lol.

  

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WhiteNotion
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Fri Dec-29-06 08:38 PM

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36. "when i was in high school..."
In response to Reply # 35


          

i used to smoke a lot. and after taking ap biology, i thought it would be a good idea to try and read the origin of species. i guess what i'm getting at is, i understand this blurriness you speak of.

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two
Member since May 07th 2003
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Sat Dec-30-06 04:39 PM

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38. "for the people:"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

the year of magical thinking - joan didion
black swan green - david mitchell
beasts of no nation - uzodinma iweala
grief - andrew holleran
the complexities of intimacy - mary caponegro
one hundred years of solitude - gabriel garcia marquez
you shall know our velocity - dave eggers

ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ

do it.

  

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smutsboy
Member since Jun 29th 2002
33301 posts
Wed Jan-03-07 01:24 PM

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70. "what be this?"
In response to Reply # 38


  

          

>beasts of no nation - uzodinma iweala

________________

https://i.imgur.com/ZkkZekl.gif

  

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two
Member since May 07th 2003
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Sat Dec-30-06 04:42 PM

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39. "oh!"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

the children's hospital - chris adrian

ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ«ƒ

do it.

  

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JayPeah
Member since Jun 07th 2006
246 posts
Sun Dec-31-06 03:38 AM

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40. "Haruki Murakami"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Some pretty weird stuff, great stories if you ask me.

--------------------------------------------------------------
My Ish....
http://www.myspace.com/jaypeah

  

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jasonprague
Member since Sep 29th 2005
1900 posts
Wed Jan-03-07 03:43 AM

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63. "I was able to attend his first and (probably) last press conference"
In response to Reply # 40


          

when he was in town to pick up an award. very quiet unassuming and very private guy. he writes some amazing books. just got his newest short stories for Christmas. looking forward to it.

PEACE

"The struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting." - Kundera

  

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6FeetDeepInThought
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Sun Dec-31-06 03:56 AM

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41. "The Road, by Cormac McCarthy"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I'm only halfway through myself, but hey, post-apocalyptic cannibalism? Hellz yeah.

  

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ovBismarck
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Sun Dec-31-06 04:42 AM

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42. "RE: 2007 reading list: leave no author unturned, no book unrecommended"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Why I Write--George Orwell
Love in the Time of Cholera--Marquez
A Confederacy of Dunces--Toole
Whose Bible Is It?--Pelikan
a subscription to The American Scholar
Letters from Earth--Mark Twain
The New American Militarism--Bacevich
The American Political Tradition...--Hofstadter
Active Liberty--Breyer
The Master and Margarita--Bulgakov

-------------
A seal walks into a club.

  

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YardBird33
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Sun Dec-31-06 10:52 AM

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44. "Anything by Christopher Moore"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Granted, I've only read 2 of his books so far this past year; but I bought both based on the jacket synopsis alone and they were both GREAT reads. I just got 5 more of his books for x-mas, so 2007 gonna be a busy reading year.

Peace-Like Stylee,
J-Bird

"Nobody light-skinned reppin' harder since Ice-T"

"Where does a platypus learn a word like hodgepodge?"

  

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HiKwelity
Member since Sep 24th 2002
4119 posts
Sun Dec-31-06 06:55 PM

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47. "Just picked up The Last Samurai and Cloud Atlas"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Thanks to PTP of course, otherwise I wouldn't know any of these books. I plan on getting to them once I am finished with Dostoevsky's The Idiot, which I finally started and pleasantly surprised with. Not only is it much easier to read than I expected, I am actually enjoying.

Due to my interest in The Wire and also seeing his name mentioned here, I picked up Right as Rain by George Pelecanos...also because it was cheap.

I was also working on Parable Of The Talents, but I pretty much quit about a third of the way through. I enjoyed Parable of the Sower but am having trouble with the second book.

Anything else I read will be strictly basketball-related.


-----------------

www.scholarballer.org

  

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janey
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Tue Jan-02-07 11:50 AM

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49. "I heartily approve, lol"
In response to Reply # 47


  

          

I'm also a big Pelecanos fan, and Right As Rain is my favorite of his.

  

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dr invisible
Member since Sep 19th 2002
3467 posts
Tue Jan-02-07 12:14 PM

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51. "I'm reading Drama City right now"
In response to Reply # 49


          

so much of his dialogue seems forced and doesnt seem very real at all. It bugs me. But i've heard a lot of good things about him. Does he get better?

  

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janey
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Tue Jan-02-07 12:21 PM

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53. "I liked Drama City but he hit a groove with Right As Rain"
In response to Reply # 51


  

          

and a couple of others right around the same time, that I don't think he's quite hit again, although I liked The Night Gardener.

  

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dr invisible
Member since Sep 19th 2002
3467 posts
Tue Jan-02-07 04:35 PM

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56. "I read a few more chapters at lunch"
In response to Reply # 53


          

I guess its just one of the main characters I think he struggles with as far as dialogue/voice. I am warming to his storytelling though.

  

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janey
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58. "is this your first Pelecanos?"
In response to Reply # 56


  

          

Have you read any Dennis Lehane or Richard Price?

Also, in that genre, I have to recommend once again my new favorite, Jess Walter. The Zero and Citizen Vince are astounding.

  

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dr invisible
Member since Sep 19th 2002
3467 posts
Tue Jan-02-07 10:28 PM

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59. "I've read some Lehane"
In response to Reply # 58


          

I like him and dislike him because he writes from my city. Its a tough standard to uphold for me but I'm fair.

Nothing on Price yet. I chose to read Pelecanos first and yeah, this is the first time I've read him. I think I'll read Price next. Suggestion? Or Right as Rain then Price.

  

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janey
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66. "Samaritan"
In response to Reply # 59


  

          

I think that's the place to start with Price.

  

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kurlyswirl
Member since Jul 13th 2002
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Mon Jan-08-07 07:30 PM

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81. "I concur. n/m"
In response to Reply # 66


  

          


~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

It's about the blanket.

kurly's Super-Duper Awesome DVD Collection:
http://www.dvdaficionado.com/dvds.html?cat=1&id=kurlyswirl

  

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kurlyswirl
Member since Jul 13th 2002
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82. "I thought Drama City was great..."
In response to Reply # 51


  

          

...but you probably should've started with Right as Rain (Derek Strange series) or A Firing Offense (Nick Stefanos series).

~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

It's about the blanket.

kurly's Super-Duper Awesome DVD Collection:
http://www.dvdaficionado.com/dvds.html?cat=1&id=kurlyswirl

  

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KingMonte
Member since Feb 13th 2006
4675 posts
Tue Jan-02-07 12:00 PM

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50. "I really like the Charlie Huston trilogy of"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Caught Stealing, Six Bad Things and A Dangerous Man.

Everybody Smokes In Hell and A Conversation with the Mann: A Novel by John Ridley are also great reads.

All suggestions are fun - nothing that would require a highlighter.

  

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spivak
Member since Dec 17th 2005
744 posts
Tue Jan-02-07 12:21 PM

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52. "the people of paper by salvador plascenscia and"
In response to Reply # 0


          

the translation of dr. apelles: a love story by david treuer

on the classic tip: thomas mann's death in venice. morrison's sula.

  

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JBoogs
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60. "RE: the people of paper by salvador plascenscia"
In response to Reply # 52


  

          

good one

***************
www.myspace.com/angoleiro
www.myspace.com/manjingaparty

  

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Morehouse
Member since Feb 25th 2003
7568 posts
Tue Jan-02-07 01:36 PM

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54. "a book a week..."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

in '07

week 1: Jan. 1-6
Saul Bellow : Herzog


on the horizon:

Gladwell : Blink and The Tipping point
Eggers : What is the What
Pynchon : Gravity's Rainbow, V
Kennedy : Nigger
Thompson : The Rum Diary


***********************************

myself is sculptor of
your body’s idiom:
the musician of your wrists;
the poet who is afraid
only to mistranslate
a rhythm in your hair...
-E.E. Cummings

  

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janey
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Tue Jan-02-07 01:56 PM

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55. "I just ordered that Randall Kennedy book"
In response to Reply # 54


  

          

after reading an essay by Emily Bernard collected in Best American Essays 2006, called "Teaching the N Word." I've kind of been resisting, but I think Kennedy is deliberately fucking with me on that one. For many and varied reasons, asking for it in the bookstore was extremely uncomfortable, which I think was part of Kennedy's intent, and it's certainly not a book that I can carry in public. But I trust him.

  

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JBoogs
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61. "if you read Gravity's Rainbow in a week, you're a beast"
In response to Reply # 54


  

          


***************
www.myspace.com/angoleiro
www.myspace.com/manjingaparty

  

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okaycomputer
Member since Dec 02nd 2002
8090 posts
Tue Jan-02-07 05:23 PM

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57. "I'm reading 'Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs' right now"
In response to Reply # 0


          

by Chuck Klosterman

It's hilarious most of the time, but sometimes it is just too much.

Luckily it is all 5-6 page essays, so it stays fresh.
It helps to have a general knowlege/enjoyment of each of his topics...not that that's difficult, it's entirely pop culture.

  

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Deebot
Member since Oct 21st 2004
26680 posts
Wed Jan-03-07 03:10 AM

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62. "just finished Lunar Park thanks to my 3 day binge"
In response to Reply # 0


          

this is literally impossible to put down in certain chunks. The surface of the book is brilliant imo...some of the creepiest and most intriguing shit i've ever read...some of it borders on being cheesy but that's part of the fun, and it still manages to keep its serious tone, while still managing good humor in parts. I'm not really sure what to think about the deeper meaning of the book though..I don't even know if it's entirely clear to me yet. Janey, and others who have read it, what did you think?

  

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janey
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69. "honestly, I'm at a point"
In response to Reply # 62


  

          

where I read Ellis for his writing, not his meaning. If there was a big message in that book, say, about father/son relationships or love or family connections or whatever, it slipped past me.

What I loved about it (when I loved it) were some of his offhand comments about parenting or life in general.

I did NOT like the ghost part. That just didn't work for me. But that's okay. I'm actually kind of resigned to his endings falling flat or flattish. See, e.g., Glamorama. Which should have ended at least a hundred pages before it did. lol

  

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Deebot
Member since Oct 21st 2004
26680 posts
Wed Jan-03-07 05:28 PM

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71. "RE: honestly, I'm at a point"
In response to Reply # 69


          

>where I read Ellis for his writing, not his meaning. If
>there was a big message in that book, say, about father/son
>relationships or love or family connections or whatever, it
>slipped past me.

right. thats coo

>What I loved about it (when I loved it) were some of his
>offhand comments about parenting or life in general.

yeah, those are fun. I still like his humor and offhand comments more than anything, but this book didn't have TOO much room for it.

>I did NOT like the ghost part. That just didn't work for me.
>But that's okay. I'm actually kind of resigned to his endings
>falling flat or flattish.

I was more impressed with his specific scenes than the layout of the ghost story. That's what kept me turning the pages. And the creepy parts/assumptions at the beginning or middle of the book were definitely better than toward the end, where it's then beaten over your head. But all in all for me....very enjoyable.

>See, e.g., Glamorama. Which should
>have ended at least a hundred pages before it did. lol

i don't know if i have any interest in reading this. But i am planning on finally reading Rules of Attraction (which I heard is Ellis' favorite book).....then after that, I'll prolly be your servant and read a bunch of your recs, because I have absolutely no knowledge of authors whatsoever..haha.

  

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janey
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Wed Jan-03-07 05:33 PM

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72. "I like Rules of Attraction a lot"
In response to Reply # 71


  

          

but my favorite is American Psycho. It's great. The whole thing is off hand commentary. It's like mutterings from inside the mind of the American Psycho. Excellent.

  

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Deebot
Member since Oct 21st 2004
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Wed Jan-03-07 05:55 PM

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74. "and i'll definitely be rereading that"
In response to Reply # 72


          

i own it, so....shouldn't be too hard. I want to pay a little more attention to it because I heard there are valid arguments that all the gruesome scenes in the book are just fantasies....but the first time through I took everything for being real, lol. But yeah...the book's a riot...you can tell Ellis was in a fun, weird place when he was writing this, haha.

  

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janey
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75. "this is funny"
In response to Reply # 74


  

          

because every conversation about the book starts with the question "Is the violence real?"

You know what? It's a novel. None of it is real. For me, that's a pretty major starting point.

American Psycho is one of the three funniest books I've ever read.

  

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Deebot
Member since Oct 21st 2004
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Wed Jan-03-07 06:04 PM

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76. "i think i might seriously go through and highlight certain lines that i ..."
In response to Reply # 75


          

for like quick reference of comedy....lol.

>American Psycho is one of the three funniest books I've ever
>read.

  

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janey
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Wed Jan-03-07 06:08 PM

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77. "Chapter titles alone can keep me in stitches"
In response to Reply # 76


  

          

lol

  

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Deebot
Member since Oct 21st 2004
26680 posts
Wed Jan-03-07 06:12 PM

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78. "oh? Like......"Brings Uzi to Gym"? Lol"
In response to Reply # 77
Wed Jan-03-07 06:13 PM by Deebot

          

and the running joke of the Patti Winters Show is fucking hilarious

  

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janey
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79. "or "Tries to Cook and Eat Girl""
In response to Reply # 78


  

          

lmao

  

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jasonprague
Member since Sep 29th 2005
1900 posts
Wed Jan-03-07 03:51 AM

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64. "I'm telling ya'll "Beasts Of No Nation""
In response to Reply # 0


          

written from the perspective of a child soldier in an unknown part of Africa.

to further prove my point let me throw down this passage I had to write down:

"If it is day, I am sitting and staring at the sun like it is the only thing to look at in this world. I am watching how sometime it is bright and other time it is like it is just struggling too much to be shining and I am wanting to ask it why it is even thinking to shine on this world. If I am sun, I will be finding another place to be shining where people are not using my light to be doing terrible terrible thing."

just one of many - powerful stuff.

PEACE

"The struggle of man against power is the struggle of memory against forgetting." - Kundera

  

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eternalist 25
Member since Dec 26th 2004
1017 posts
Wed Jan-03-07 11:32 AM

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65. "alright janey..."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

i read pullman's trilogy...not bad

gimme some other sci fi fantasy books you think i should check out

<-----El Nino

  

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janey
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67. "Perdido Street Station, by China Mieville"
In response to Reply # 65


  

          

also, Someone Comes To Town, Someone Leaves Town, by Cory Doctorow.

Both of those are very different from the Pullman trilogy, and very different from one another, but Perdido Street Station in particular will just blow your mind.

  

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JAESCOTT777
Member since Feb 18th 2006
28484 posts
Wed Jan-03-07 12:13 PM

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68. "cant go wrong with The Count Of Monte Cristo"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

cant stop wont stop-Jeff Chang(best book written about hiphop)
Assata-Assata Shakur( every american should read that)
Decolonizing the Mind-Ngugi Wa'Thiongo
The Invisible Man- Ralph Ellison(My favorite of all time)

  

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okaycomputer
Member since Dec 02nd 2002
8090 posts
Mon Jan-08-07 07:25 PM

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80. "just started two that are great so far..."
In response to Reply # 0
Mon Jan-08-07 07:36 PM by okaycomputer

          

Garner by Kristin Allio

Takes place in my home state of New Hampshire in 1925. This, so far, has been a much more difficult read than I had expected. The narritive weaves in and out sort of bunching together thoughts, memoirs, notes and various other observations from the narrator. You have to kind of let everything brush by, it's very dreamlike. Extremely rewarding read so far.



the other is Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain

Finally picked this up, it's been pretty good so far. The man can do no wrong in my eyes though (well, maybe the sit-com being an exception).

  

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kurlyswirl
Member since Jul 13th 2002
16693 posts
Mon Jan-08-07 07:44 PM

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83. "I've been thinking about buying the audiobook."
In response to Reply # 80


  

          

I've already read it (I think I may have been one who recommended it to you), but I want it because Bourdain narrates. He's such a good narrator for his show that I think it would be highly entertaining.

I also want to get the audiobook for Hard Revolution by George Pelecanos. (Already read that, too.) Lance Reddick (Daniels on The Wire) narrates.

>the other is Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain
>
>Finally picked this up, it's been pretty good so far. The man
>can do no wrong in my eyes though (well, maybe the sit-com
>being an exception).


~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

It's about the blanket.

kurly's Super-Duper Awesome DVD Collection:
http://www.dvdaficionado.com/dvds.html?cat=1&id=kurlyswirl

  

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okaycomputer
Member since Dec 02nd 2002
8090 posts
Mon Jan-08-07 07:54 PM

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85. "i've never listened to an audio book"
In response to Reply # 83


          

though I've always thought if I did, it would be a non-fiction/sociology type of book. I'm not sure why though, maybe because it'd at least seem like talk radio and therefor a little more natural.

I was thinking of getting Malcom Gladwell or a Klosterman book in audio form, but you're right Bourdain would without a doubt be great to listen to. Besides, I've since heard Klosterman on a talk show and his voice is incredibly annoying.

  

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kurlyswirl
Member since Jul 13th 2002
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Mon Jan-08-07 08:05 PM

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89. "Me neither, actually!"
In response to Reply # 85


  

          

>though I've always thought if I did, it would be a
>non-fiction/sociology type of book. I'm not sure why though,
>maybe because it'd at least seem like talk radio and therefor
>a little more natural.

Yeah, makes sense. Kind of like listening to a feature on NPR news.


~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

It's about the blanket.

kurly's Super-Duper Awesome DVD Collection:
http://www.dvdaficionado.com/dvds.html?cat=1&id=kurlyswirl

  

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janey
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123120 posts
Mon Jan-08-07 08:12 PM

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90. "If I hadn't already read it,"
In response to Reply # 89


  

          

I would get Adam Gopnik reading Through The Children's Gate.

But I had some great experiences listening to Steinbeck novels read by Gary Sinese back before there were mp3s. Sinese loves Steinbeck and it really shows in his reading.

Travels With Charley, unabridged, read by Gary Sinese. A great listening experience.

I've been trying to listen to Mark Kurlansky's NonViolence: 25 Lessons from a Radical Idea or something something and getting just nowhere with it. I'm finding it dull as dishwater, lol.

  

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janey
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123120 posts
Mon Jan-08-07 07:59 PM

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86. "I have the soundtrack for Hard Revolution if you want it"
In response to Reply # 83


  

          

not quite the same thing, lol

  

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kurlyswirl
Member since Jul 13th 2002
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Mon Jan-08-07 08:03 PM

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88. "Yeah, I already have that. Thanks, tho'. lol - n/m"
In response to Reply # 86


  

          


~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

It's about the blanket.

kurly's Super-Duper Awesome DVD Collection:
http://www.dvdaficionado.com/dvds.html?cat=1&id=kurlyswirl

  

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UncleClimax
Charter member
13786 posts
Tue Jun-05-07 07:01 PM

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100. "kitchen confidential is dope"
In response to Reply # 80


  

          

my brother got it for me for my bday...i havent had a chance to get into it too deep, but the first two chapters have been golden. dude is a really good writer (for a cook).

__________________
http://twitter.com/theloniousfunk
http://havetravelled.blogspot.com
http://instagram.com/arsonwelles

“Be uncomfortable; be sand, not oil, to the machinery of the world.”
- Gunter Eich

  

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janey
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123120 posts
Mon Jan-08-07 07:51 PM

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84. "so that damn book of best american essays"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I've bought three books already just because of mentions in the essays, and so far they're great.

I'm currently reading a biography of Kinsey. We all know he's my hero, and this biography is just great. And part of what makes it great is that the biographer is clearly writing for a British audience and so he'll do these little tangents that explain things about the US that are fucking hysterical. Of course there are a bunch on sexual mores, but the one that really cracked me up was this little scree on weather in Indiana. He's like, "Strangely, Americans don't seem to realize just how INTOLERABLE their weather is" and then goes on to describe it in detail, and even has a footnote about the fact that while he was in Indiana doing research in 95, 600 people died in Chicago that summer (remember that?). He doesn't mention that that was a once in a lifetime weather pattern, lol, but apparently is willing to let his readers think that Chicago loses 600 citizens to heat every summer.

But it's a great book. I am thoroughly enjoying it and my respect for Kinsey has only increased.

  

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okaycomputer
Member since Dec 02nd 2002
8090 posts
Mon Jan-08-07 08:02 PM

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87. "is that the 'best non-required reading for 2006' thing?"
In response to Reply # 84


          

I've never read one of those, but was very close to buying it yesterday.

  

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janey
Charter member
123120 posts
Mon Jan-08-07 08:13 PM

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91. "No, although I have that as well"
In response to Reply # 87


  

          

The one I mean is one of the Best American _____ Series. They do short stories, travel writing, science writing, I don't know what all. And a friend gave me the Best American Essays 2006 along with Best American Non Required Reading for xmas. The first I'm reading. The second I'm more dipping into and out of at odd moments.

  

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Meenameen
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198 posts
Tue Jan-09-07 09:41 AM

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92. "'The Professor's Daughter' - Emily Raboteau n/m"
In response to Reply # 0


          

-------
lurking since...wait, i don't owe you an explanation...

  

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Melanism
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20422 posts
Tue Jan-09-07 09:49 AM

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93. "I just ordered 'Love Is A Mix Tape' by Rob Sheffield"
In response to Reply # 0


          


-------------------
http://melanism.com
http://preptimeposse.blogspot.com
http://www.myspace.com/melanism
http://www.last.fm/user/Melanism/

  

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Malachi_Constant
Member since Oct 17th 2003
180 posts
Wed Jan-10-07 03:44 AM

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94. "RE: 2007 reading list: leave no author unturned, no book unrecommended"
In response to Reply # 0


          

The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen
60 Stories + 40 Stories by Donald Barthelme
The Collected Stories of Richard Yates
Civilwarland in Bad Decline- George Saunders
A Small Place- Jamaica Kincaid
Self Help- Lorrie Moore

**********************************

cease cows, life is short.

  

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2nd2Nun
Member since Oct 27th 2004
783 posts
Wed Jan-10-07 11:19 AM

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96. "Let us know what you think about Corrections"
In response to Reply # 94


  

          

Some people loved it, but for some reason I struggled to get through it.

_____________
kimnunley.com
@kimnunley

  

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Lyva
Member since Jul 20th 2006
364 posts
Wed Jan-10-07 04:39 AM

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95. "things i've read recently..."
In response to Reply # 0


          

george orwell - 1984
george orwell - burmese days
bertrand russell - why i'm not a christian

i read the 2 orwell books online. 1984 speaks for it's self. if you wanna understand power, i suggest you read it. burmese days takes place in india under british rule. it's really interesting on a number of levels, but if you're a lonely guy, you'll really connect with john flory, the main character. why i'm not a christian is a must read for atheist and skeptics. you can read a sample of the book at bn.com.

  

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dr invisible
Member since Sep 19th 2002
3467 posts
Wed Jan-10-07 11:46 AM

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97. "3 Nights in August - Buzz Billinger"
In response to Reply # 0


          

Buzz follows around Tony LaRussa for a 3 game series with the Cubs. Pretty fun so far but Buzz has a man crush on Tony that can get annoying.

Drama City got better. I had some trouble with some of the ways he characterizes some of the lower levels of the drug game. Sometimes they didnt seem real.

Samaritan is next I believe thanks to Janey and Kurlyswirl.

  

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Darryl_Licke
Member since Jun 06th 2002
70279 posts
Tue Jun-05-07 12:38 AM

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98. "Up for the 6 month summer update"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

por favor.

but there is nothing wrong with being odd. i mean you arent inkast or adwhizz odd. - VABestBBW
Binlahab is a bitch.
I wouldn't trust okp, some of them don't even get any anymore since the Re's stopped - Anonymous OKP

  

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earthseed
Member since Feb 26th 2004
26989 posts
Tue Jun-05-07 11:43 AM

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99. "I've read everything Octavia E. Butler has written. What's first of hers"
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on your list?

now go runtelldat, ho.

  

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Darryl_Licke
Member since Jun 06th 2002
70279 posts
Tue Jun-05-07 11:22 PM

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103. "wild seed, dawn, adulthood rites"
In response to Reply # 99


  

          

I want to finish xenogenesis and read patternmaster from beginning to end.

but there is nothing wrong with being odd. i mean you arent inkast or adwhizz odd. - VABestBBW
Binlahab is a bitch.
I wouldn't trust okp, some of them don't even get any anymore since the Re's stopped - Anonymous OKP

  

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earthseed
Member since Feb 26th 2004
26989 posts
Wed Jun-06-07 07:15 AM

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104. "let me know what you think about them ..."
In response to Reply # 103


  

          

have you read Kindred and Parable of the Sower and Talents?

now go runtelldat, ho.

  

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jane eyre
Member since Jan 16th 2007
715 posts
Tue Jun-05-07 07:08 PM

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101. "RE: 2007 reading list: leave no author unturned, no book unrecommended"
In response to Reply # 0
Tue Jun-05-07 07:11 PM by jane eyre

          

lord of the rings trilogy-- tolkien
the hours-- michael cunningham
the curious incident of the dog in night-time-- mark haddon
everything is illuminated-- jonathan safran foer
the singing neanderthal-- steven mitchen
death and the kings horseman-- wole soyinka
the tunnel: selected poems of russell edson-- russell edson

i wasn't a huge fan of everything is illuminated but i'm gonna read the rest of foers stuff. i liked the novel, but by the time i got to the end of it, i dunno. i felt like i'd read the book before. half way through, it started to feel like the kind of book that writers from my generation insist on cranking out. i blame dave eggers for opening the flood gates.

disclaimer: it's a matter of taste but i'm not all that crazy about eggers. i began to suspect an eggers influence pretty soon into foers novel. i thought that maybe foers liked eggers or knew him. well, come to find out foers is part of the mcsweeney crew and my suspicions weren't without merit:

http://www.amazon.com/Future-Dictionary-America-Jonathan-Safran/dp/1932416420

the funny thing is, it's the generational factor that makes me recommend everything is illuminated. i think it's pretty incredible to read the creative out-put of the talented twenty-somethings. i didn't have a clear sense of "a voice from our generation" in the book world until i read everything is illuminated. foer is just one voice but i think that generational quality is a distinct achievement of the novel. it's also creative, has some incredibly nice spots, and it's funny (ofcourse it has to be...especially the language games and mix-ups).

  

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janey
Charter member
123120 posts
Tue Jun-05-07 07:22 PM

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102. "have you read the archived thread on Everything is Illuminated?"
In response to Reply # 101


  

          

You might find it interesting.

  

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jane eyre
Member since Jan 16th 2007
715 posts
Wed Jun-06-07 11:19 AM

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105. "i didn't know there was one."
In response to Reply # 102


          

now i do. i'll find it.

i'm more on the fence than anything about eii. i know my post probably doesn't seem like it. the thread might help me get off the fence to one side or another.

  

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janey
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123120 posts
Wed Jun-06-07 11:31 AM

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106. "I re-read it yesterday"
In response to Reply # 105


  

          

and my prediction was wrong.

I predicted that his next book would be a book of short stories and that the one after that would be a novel really worth reading.

Well, he skipped the short stories and went straight into writing something really thoughtful and lovely.

  

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jane eyre
Member since Jan 16th 2007
715 posts
Wed Jun-06-07 09:18 PM

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107. "that was a good thread."
In response to Reply # 106


          

>Well, he skipped the short stories and went straight into
>writing something really thoughtful and lovely.

the reason i was interested in reading the rest of his stuff is because i hoped that the things that gave me qualms about the book would be ironed out. it's obviously a very good novel but he wrote in a way that made me want to consider why it missed the mark of being great. it's a damn good first novel. most of my issues with the book i attribute to the experience factor. talent matures in a funny way; obscurely. i personally think that there are some things going on with eei that maybe weren't possible for him to see. about the only thing that gels stuff for some writers is time and the mysterious movement of the writing powers that be. for that reason, i would have predicted a novel out of him, but i thought it could've just as easily have been a continuation-working-through of what he's got going on with eei, as it could've been a confident articulation of his offering to the table about the contemporary novel. i was curious to see how a mysterious process would play out, if at all, w/ foers. i was hopeful that he was the real deal. your comment about his next novel is encouraging.

when i was thinking about the book, i factored in the eggers-mcsweeney influence, too. and maybe that's unfair. i hear foers in the book and i like what i hear. his tinkering with technique/structure will catch up to the other stuff, i figure. maybe somehow things will click instead of going clunk. or maybe he'll drop some stuff. i have no idea. he's a writer i'll keep tabs on. i might be so far left field, but i think he's a generational voice. time will tell.

  

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janey
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123120 posts
Thu Jun-07-07 11:09 AM

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108. "I should clarify"
In response to Reply # 107


  

          

His second novel (3d book), Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, was way better than could have been anticipated simply by reading Everything Is Illuminated. He matured a LOT as a writer and came up with something really beautiful.

  

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jane eyre
Member since Jan 16th 2007
715 posts
Thu Jun-07-07 03:41 PM

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109. "i almost"
In response to Reply # 108


          

read extremely loud and incredibly close first.

the other thing about the archived post:

anytime people discuss eggers, i think of an email exchange/interview that he typed out with the harvard advocate. back when the genius book was hot. part of his response to the interviewer:

"I think criticism, more often than not, completely misses the point, yes. The critical impulse, demonstrated by the tone of many of your own questions, is to suspect, doubt, tear at, and to take something apart to see how it works. Which of course is completely the wrong thing to do to art....When we pick at and tear into artistic output of whatever kind, we really have to examine our motives for doing so. What is it about art that can make us so angry? ...To enjoy art one needs time, patience, and a generous heart, and criticism is done, by and large, by impatient people who have axes to grind. The worst sort of critics are (analogy coming) butterfly collectors - they chase something, ostensibly out of their search for beauty, then, once they get close, they catch that beautiful something, they kill it, they stick a pin through its abdomen, dissect it and label it....Just as no one wants to grow up to be an IRS agent, no one should want to grow up to maliciously dissect books. Are there fair and helpful book critics? Yes, of course. But by and large, the only book reviews that should be trusted are by those who have themselves written books. And the more successful and honored the writer, the less likely that writer is to demolish another writer. Which is further proof that criticism comes from a dark and dank place. What kind of person seeks to bring down another? Doesn't a normal person, with his own life and goals and work to do, simply let others live? Yes. We all know that to be true."

  

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