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minps
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Fri Apr-01-05 10:41 AM

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"Hip Hop Mourns the Death of MC Conscious"


          

Hip Hop Mourns the Death of MC Conscious

(Revolutionary Suicide Mix)

Min. Paul Scott

As day goes and night falls for the rest of our lives, we'll miss y'all...

Just a Moment-Nas



According to Hood News, Hip Hop is mourning the death of MC Conscious. It was first speculated that Conscious was murdered by corporate gangsta's as retaliation for his work to get drugs off the streets of Black America or that he got caught in the crossfire when trying to squash a beef between two rival rappers. However, an investigation revealed that he simply committed suicide. No longer able to carry the responsibility of saving a lost generation and at the same time giving them a funky beat to dance too. It is reported that he was watching the latest episode of 'Strange Love' when he put a pistol to his head and......

'Can we please have a moment of silence ?'

The ability of Black artists to not only "move tha crowd" but to be a viable political force has long been a subject of debate in the Black community. For white folks music may be something to two step to at the Saturday bight Ball but for Black folks even the songs that ,to the untrained ear , were made to make ' a joyful noise to the Lord' or serve as weekend coolin' out music have always had deeper social and political undertones. If we look back at the days of slavery, we will see that the 'sweet' negro spirituals of the enslaved Africans were actually directions for the big break North. So 'Swing Down Sweet Chariot' was not really a prelude to George Clinton's monster jam of the 70's but more in line with Dead Prez's 'Let's Get Free.'

During the Civil Rights/Black Power Era, the music of the Last Poets and Gil Scott Heron served as the perfect sound track for the rebellions that were going on across America. As we look back at that era, it is hard to see where the activism ended and the music began. Or were they one in the same?

'Can we have another moment of silence ?'

During the late 80's, the Reaganomics of the Reagan- Bush Era began to take its toll on the Black community and the frustrations of Black youth began to be reflected in Hip Hop. Although the '80's were referred to as the decade of self indulgence, the gulf between the haves and the have nots began to broaden. While some members of the Black middle class were blessed with economic growth, the masses of Black people suffered under the curse of voodoo economics. Also the dissatisfaction with post Black Empowerment Era, COINTELPRO ravaged Black leadership left a void in the Black community that Hip Hop artists slowly began to fill.

Although some rap artists became the poster children of an underground "culture" that had recently hit the lotto with corporate America, the pipe dreams of a Hip Hop Nation of 'dookie' gold rope wearing millionaires with Nike endorsements clashed with the realities of ghetto slums and crack babies.

Out of this socio-political climate sprang forth a new form of 'edutainment' known as Conscious Hip Hop. During this period, groups such as Public Enemy, X-Clan, Poor Righteous Teachers, Boogie Down Productions and a nation of Pro Black militant emcees grabbed the mantle of Black leadership and hit the scene like an army of Urban Dance Floor Guerillas dedicated to freeing your mind so that your behind would follow.

At first the samples of speeches by Black Power 'radicals' mixed perfectly with the black to tha bone lyrics of fury of the rap artists , as they gave both inspiration and information to a nation of youth who were, as Whitney Houston sang, looking for a hero. For many, the rap artists were serving as temp agents, filling in for Black leaders who were on an extended hiatus. But as time went on it was revealed that Black Leadership had resigned and the temp agents had become full time employees.

'Can we please have a moment of TRUTH ?'

What has become painfully evident is that Hip Hop artists were not meant to be revolutionary leaders. They were merely supposed to supply the hook while Black revolutionaries kicked the powerful verses. The difference between an entertainer and a revolutionary leader is the willingness to give his or her life for the people. To tell a TRUTH so powerful that it will inevitably stir the wrath of a ruthless, unforgiving white supremacist system. As Yeshua, the Black revolutionary Messiah taught us, 'there is no greater love than this, that a man should lay down his life for his friends.' A revolutionary leader must be willing to commit , as the late Huey P Newton would say , ' revolutionary suicide.' Are the conscious rappers willing to commit even revolutionary "career" suicide for the LIBERATION of Afrikan people? The failure of Conscious Hip Hop to consistently serve as a voice of resistance has made many in the Hip Hop community become disillusioned with the art form. And the cries of 'Hip Hop is dead' that was once used to mourn the commercialization of Hip Hop by corporate America is now being used to mourn the ineffectiveness and inconsistences of Conscious Hip Hop.

'Can we please have a moment of PEACE ?'

While the controversy over VH1's reality show Strange Love may seem like an insignificant issue for some, it may very well serve as the final nail in the coffin of Conscious Hip Hop. If the Conscious Hip Hop community cannot even organize to derail a reality show that blatantly destroyed the legacy of the major icon of Conscious rap, Public Enemy, then how can they inspire the people to tackle the bigger issues such as racism, political 'disenfranchisement' or police brutality? Surely, this will have a ripple affect on future CD releases by Conscious Hip Hop artists. Because if you don't have the courage speak out against Strange Love, then what are you going to speak about on your next CD? What is your subject matter going to be about unless you talk about 'racism' and 'white supremacy' in very generic and abstract terms. So for many the state of Conscious Hip Hop is like a cold dark, necropolis of failed attempts and shattered dreams of a musical revolution that never came to pass.

'Can we have a moment for the children ?'

Many ancient theologies and philosophies speak of something having to die in order to live again. One such myth is the story of the Phoenix that burns itself into ashes every 500 years only to be reborn again. So as we mourn the death of Conscious Hip Hop, we also look forward to its rebirth. We look forward to a Conscious Hip Hop that will partner with Afrikan revolutionary leadership to not only capture the imagination of the people but will also bring about revolutionary change. We look forward to the day when members of the Afrikan Power Movement and Hip Hop Nation hold joint summits that will serve as more than music networking sessions. We look forward to the day when Conscious Hip Hop artists will feature Afrocentric scholars on their CD's and mixtapes and the day when Afrocentric Scholars will allow Hip Hop artists to warm the crowd up for them at conferences before they drop some science on the masses. We look foward to the Hip Hop Resurrection Movement that must happen.

But as for now, Conscious Hip Hop is dead. So, can we please have a moment to mourn.......Amen.

Minister Paul Scott represents the Messianic Afrikan Nation in Durham NC. He can be reached at (919) 949-4352 email minpaulscott@yahoo.com web site http://members.blackplanet.com/THE-MYD



  

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Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
As always Minister Scott, great post!
Apr 01st 2005
1
RE: As always Minister Scott, great post!
Apr 01st 2005
2
How do we reclaim the music?
Apr 01st 2005
3
RE: How do we reclaim the music?
Apr 01st 2005
5
I believe this is where we get snagged
Apr 03rd 2005
26
simple.
Apr 01st 2005
7
Straw man.
Apr 01st 2005
8
Denial
Apr 01st 2005
13
I don't...
Apr 03rd 2005
25
great aspirations Firebrand, but...
Apr 03rd 2005
24
RE: How do we reclaim the music?
Apr 09th 2005
55
blame the industry much?
Apr 01st 2005
4
At what point do you accuse an industry that
Apr 01st 2005
6
      i still dont think u get it
Apr 01st 2005
9
           funny how your attempted refutation actually proved his point. lmao
Apr 01st 2005
14
                ?
Apr 01st 2005
15
                     Here's how:
Apr 01st 2005
17
                          then we both agree.
Apr 01st 2005
19
                               oh, i don't think you two are very far apart at all.
Apr 01st 2005
20
                                    I found that odd as well.
Apr 01st 2005
21
                                    no (again).
Apr 05th 2005
34
                                         How about...
Apr 05th 2005
40
                                              so in other words black people are inferior
Apr 05th 2005
41
                                                   Urrrgghh........
Apr 06th 2005
42
                                                   The short of it.
Apr 06th 2005
43
noone esle has anything to say? wow.
Apr 01st 2005
16
I talked to Chuck and PE about this same issue. (my sig refelcts it)
Apr 01st 2005
18
Everthing is in cycles
Apr 01st 2005
22
I wanna hear sumin new too.
Apr 02nd 2005
23
      does anyone think this is bigger?
Apr 03rd 2005
27
Really dope usage of the Nas song quotes
Apr 04th 2005
28
i REALLY like this point:
Apr 04th 2005
29
Is it too early to mourn, is it too late to ride (c) Kweli
Apr 04th 2005
30
Will hop heads ACCEPT Hip Hop influenced academics?
Apr 04th 2005
31
      I think so, if they are not seen as living a different reality....
Apr 05th 2005
37
           I'm hearing him. I know my brother, and cousins hear him.
Apr 05th 2005
39
                RE: I'm hearing him. I know my brother, and cousins hear him.
Apr 06th 2005
44
                     I think that people forget about educated Rural
Apr 06th 2005
45
                          I'm not being divisive at all...
Apr 07th 2005
50
                               True, but it's rural and suburban hip hop heads too...
Apr 07th 2005
51
                                    I feel you...
Apr 07th 2005
54
i'm trying to be conscious...
Apr 05th 2005
32
we need to mourn the death of the consciousness within us.
Apr 05th 2005
33
I think the key here is that there is a new gerneration of
Apr 05th 2005
35
Good reply...
Apr 05th 2005
36
      Exactly. You can see that when people talk about
Apr 05th 2005
38
I'll tell you the DAY conscious Hip-Hop started to die:
Apr 06th 2005
46
But that same day there were a million other songs out
Apr 06th 2005
48
      I have a theory...
Apr 07th 2005
53
Rawkus records never birthed any consciousness
Apr 06th 2005
47
they had jailbirds on they team. of course not.
Apr 06th 2005
49
RE: Rawkus records never birthed any consciousness
Apr 07th 2005
52

FireBrand
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145739 posts
Fri Apr-01-05 07:21 AM

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1. "As always Minister Scott, great post!"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          


******************************
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----------------------
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******************************
Inaug'ral Member of the OkaySports Hall of Fame.

<---- Our newest All-American Canidate @ saftey,

  

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minps
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Fri Apr-01-05 07:29 AM

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2. "RE: As always Minister Scott, great post!"
In response to Reply # 1


          

Thanx

  

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FireBrand
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Fri Apr-01-05 07:30 AM

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3. "How do we reclaim the music?"
In response to Reply # 0
Fri Apr-01-05 07:36 AM by FireBrand

  

          

What critical steps need to be taken?
Is it as simple as doing more to support "more positive" artists?

will it take a change in behavior? Will we have to address the listenting audience first? If that is the case, then is it a matter of the music, or more a matter of nurturing and raising the seeds?

Or is it a multi layered approach?

where do we start?



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----------------------
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<---- Our newest All-American Canidate @ saftey,

  

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minps
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Fri Apr-01-05 07:43 AM

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5. "RE: How do we reclaim the music?"
In response to Reply # 3


          

Peace and Blessings,

First we have to "want" to make it happen. Then we must mentally and spiritually prepare ourselves for the hits that we are going to take to make it happen. I think Dr. John Henrik Clarke said it best when he concluded his lectures by telling fols to form a patnership with the man in the mirror and say that "you and I choose to make a change. And we chose to do it, right now.

  

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brokenchains79
Member since Nov 22nd 2003
6567 posts
Sun Apr-03-05 10:28 AM

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26. "I believe this is where we get snagged"
In response to Reply # 5


  

          

>Then we must mentally and spiritually prepare ourselves for the
>hits that we are going to take to make it happen.

The paycheck is what prevents struggle. You can know what is mentally and spiritually correct, then people say... "How will I eat"

******************************
http://myspace.com/jahi
******************************
"me as a black man will not
stand here and allow you to
talk dumb shit about white
women that simply is not true"
SouthPhillyMan

  

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suave_bro
Member since Nov 19th 2002
9433 posts
Fri Apr-01-05 08:06 AM

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7. "simple."
In response to Reply # 3


          

this is what needs to happen

the people, or some activist or political leader needs to stand up before congress and say something to the effect of: "as a people we are controlled by what we see and hear. we can't really formulate any cohesive thoughts on our own thus we rely on music and television to do this for us. we have no fathers and family structure so we rely mostly on the music and television to guide us. with that being said, we would like more music and television programs that can aide us in curbing violence in our communities and can help raise our kids."

you may think im being facetious but i'm not. we need to convince the powers that be that these things are true. if we can do that, then they will have no choice but to step in and regulate the airwaves...3 problems though: 1) that would be promoting censorship, 2) not many black people will co-sign legislations that clearly say blacks are holding blacks back 3) just like when cash money/no limit/hypnotized minds were broke and underground back in the 90's, the people will STILL find a way to support the bullshit.

  

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FireBrand
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Fri Apr-01-05 08:13 AM

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8. "Straw man."
In response to Reply # 7


  

          

Description of Straw Man
The Straw Man fallacy is committed when a person simply ignores a person's actual position and substitutes a distorted, exaggerated or misrepresented version of that position. This sort of "reasoning" has the following pattern:


Person A has position X.
Person B presents position Y (which is a distorted version of X).
Person B attacks position Y.
Therefore X is false/incorrect/flawed.
This sort of "reasoning" is fallacious because attacking a distorted version of a position simply does not constitute an attack on the position itself. One might as well expect an attack on a poor drawing of a person to hurt the person.

Examples of Straw Man

Prof. Jones: "The university just cut our yearly budget by $10,000."
Prof. Smith: "What are we going to do?"
Prof. Brown: "I think we should eliminate one of the teaching assistant positions. That would take care of it."
Prof. Jones: "We could reduce our scheduled raises instead."
Prof. Brown: " I can't understand why you want to bleed us dry like that, Jones."

"Senator Jones says that we should not fund the attack submarine program. I disagree entirely. I can't understand why he wants to leave us defenseless like that."

Bill and Jill are arguing about cleaning out their closets:
Jill: "We should clean out the closets. They are getting a bit messy."
Bill: "Why, we just went through those closets last year. Do we have to clean them out everyday?"
Jill: "I never said anything about cleaning them out every day. You just want too keep all your junk forever, which is just ridiculous."



******************************
www.okayplayer.com/guidelines
----------------------
http://www.myspace.com/egyptianknight
******************************
Inaug'ral Member of the OkaySports Hall of Fame.

<---- Our newest All-American Canidate @ saftey,

  

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suave_bro
Member since Nov 19th 2002
9433 posts
Fri Apr-01-05 10:53 AM

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13. "Denial"
In response to Reply # 8


          

de·ni·al (d-nl)
n.

An unconscious defense mechanism characterized by refusal to acknowledge painful realities, thoughts, or feelings

  

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blaXXX
Member since Dec 01st 2004
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Sun Apr-03-05 10:26 AM

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25. "I don't..."
In response to Reply # 7


          

think YOU are being facetious in the least. However, I do think you gravely discounted the veracity and POWER of what you assert:

Powers-at-BE are fully aware that Americans are controlled by what they see/hear on mediums (just ask R. Murdock!)-------ghetto and suburbs alike! Therefore White Racism, within the conceptuality of its ETERNAL evolution, must only allow for Rap/Hip-Hop Acts that yield a tumultuous and nefarious Image of Blackness-----as the most widely disseminated messages.

Its the veracity in how the Enron/WorldCom/MCI/Arthur Andersen Corporate Scandal-players get to REMAIN a TOTALLY Caucasoidal-fraternity------via that image of Ying-Yang/Lil' Jon/50/G-Unit as what the Powers-at-BE MUST allow America to be fed about Blackmen. Because one of us need not even partake of Hip-Hop in this Nation, yet still be viewed/prejudiced/processed like we are of that Fruit-----w/ honor-grad degree in hand!!

The stagnating power of their works, is phenom. Then again, they've been working on this strategii for scores of years so...don't be surprised if you go stand in front of Congress with that efficient scenario you present below-----and get blackballed off The Hill.

>this is what needs to happen
>
>the people, or some activist or political leader needs to
>stand up before congress and say something to the effect of:
>"as a people we are controlled by what we see and hear. we
>can't really formulate any cohesive thoughts on our own thus
>we rely on music and television to do this for us. we have no
>fathers and family structure so we rely mostly on the music
>and television to guide us. with that being said, we would
>like more music and television programs that can aide us in
>curbing violence in our communities and can help raise our
>kids."
>
>you may think im being facetious but i'm not. we need to
>convince the powers that be that these things are true. if we
>can do that, then they will have no choice but to step in and
>regulate the airwaves...3 problems though: 1) that would be
>promoting censorship, 2) not many black people will co-sign
>legislations that clearly say blacks are holding blacks back
>3) just like when cash money/no limit/hypnotized minds were
>broke and underground back in the 90's, the people will STILL
>find a way to support the bullshit.

____ _____ _____

*--> www.soundclick.com/blaXXX <--*

*~* Go ahead! EXPERIENCE the latest non-Profit joint!*~*

____ _____ _____

blaXXX' breviaries: 2005---And we coulda saved more...if they ONLY KNEW they were Slaves
____

  

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blaXXX
Member since Dec 01st 2004
1649 posts
Sun Apr-03-05 10:10 AM

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24. "great aspirations Firebrand, but..."
In response to Reply # 3


          

its Corporate now pal-----ain't no turning back...the "Conscious Rapper" is OFFICIALLY-------the BAD GUY!!

____ _____ _____

*--> www.soundclick.com/blaXXX <--*

*~* Go ahead! EXPERIENCE the latest non-Profit joint!*~*

____ _____ _____

blaXXX' breviaries: 2005---And we coulda saved more...if they ONLY KNEW they were Slaves
____

  

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W.Delyte
Member since Mar 14th 2005
7 posts
Sat Apr-09-05 07:46 PM

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55. "RE: How do we reclaim the music?"
In response to Reply # 3


          

why dont you start with changing BET???

  

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suave_bro
Member since Nov 19th 2002
9433 posts
Fri Apr-01-05 07:40 AM

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4. "blame the industry much?"
In response to Reply # 0


          

when does the audience/consumer take some blame for the death of conscious hip hop?

I made a post when i first joined okayplayer about will smith and dead prez (at the time neither of them were signed to record labels). both rappers are clearly alternatives to the pimp/gangsta/denigrating hip hop that has flooded the market, and both of them are dangling off both opposite ends of the spectrum of hip hop. but are black folks checking for them? nope. will smith is too soft, dead prez is too political/deep. in the middle of that you have your basic non-complicated lyrics rapping gangster (this mentallity and acceptance of the pimp trick gangster thug and rejection of both the black nationalist militant negro and the 'white' talking non-threatening soft negro, is a reflection of our mentallity but i will get in2 that some other time) which the community can relate to, he doesnt make them think too deep and he doesnt make them feel "white" when they listen to him.

i'm not mad @ the industry for capitalizing on this. if christian hip hop became the big thing, thug/gangster rap would be gone tomorrow.

  

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FireBrand
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Fri Apr-01-05 07:51 AM

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6. "At what point do you accuse an industry that"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

1) Cool hunts
2) Agenda Sets
3) Is responsible for market saturation
4) Controls distribution
5) Is the gatekeeper for expression

responsible in any way? sure it is the responsibilty of a family to guide, but in a system where it is common to have the tv baby sit how can you not look to the industry as being irresponsible?


******************************
www.okayplayer.com/guidelines
----------------------
http://www.myspace.com/egyptianknight
******************************
Inaug'ral Member of the OkaySports Hall of Fame.

<---- Our newest All-American Canidate @ saftey,

  

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suave_bro
Member since Nov 19th 2002
9433 posts
Fri Apr-01-05 08:15 AM

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9. "i still dont think u get it"
In response to Reply # 6


          

one of the biggest myths in hip hop is that these artists that are flooding the airwaves now were just walking down the street freestyling about rims, hoes, guns, selling dope and some white guy in a suit said "u want a record deal!?"

back in the mid to late 90's, the streets were buzzing about B.G.'s chopper city album, Master p and C-murder's TRU, triple six mafia's Tear da club up, ying yang twinz "whistle while u twurk"...i can remember when these cats were just nobodies but people loved their music, NOW they are millionaires! why? because the industry recognized "hey, all this bubbly shiny suit bullshit is not what the people want, they want this gangsta, grimy, street, down south hip hop" and they signed them!! EXCELLENT. BUSINESS. MOVE.

bottom line: the PEOPLE {{WANT}} this bullshit. yes it's frustrating and I dont like the music at all but I'm not about to walk around ignoring the obvious. and lets just be truthful here, the black community as a whole just isn't as intellectual/intelligent as it once was.

  

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chillsm00th
Member since Mar 25th 2005
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Fri Apr-01-05 12:18 PM

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14. "funny how your attempted refutation actually proved his point. lmao"
In response to Reply # 9


  

          

<--All-American couple


"people on here just be like " go for it man! its sex! god forbid you turn down SEX! *dances around the baal statue*" -- Stephbit

  

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suave_bro
Member since Nov 19th 2002
9433 posts
Fri Apr-01-05 12:21 PM

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15. "?"
In response to Reply # 14
Fri Apr-01-05 12:23 PM by FireBrand

          

he is blaming the system, I am blaming the consumer. how did i support his argument?

  

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chillsm00th
Member since Mar 25th 2005
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Fri Apr-01-05 12:30 PM

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17. "Here's how:"
In response to Reply # 15


  

          

1) Cool hunts
"back in the mid to late 90's, the streets were buzzing about B.G.'s chopper city album, Master p and C-murder's TRU, triple six mafia's Tear da club up, ying yang twinz "whistle while u twurk"...i can remember when these cats were just nobodies but people loved their music"
--The recording industry looked for the next big thing and found these local artists selling thousands of independent records.

2) Agenda Sets
"because the industry recognized 'hey, all this bubbly shiny suit bullshit is not what the people want, they want this gangsta, grimy, street, down south hip hop'"
--The recording industry decides that it will put its money behind Master P and not, say, Crooked Lettaz. And because the industry has a multi-billion dollar marketing machine, it can set what it thinks is "cool."

3) Is responsible for market saturation
"and they signed them!!"
--Signed them and dozens of other copycat acts in hopes of making the same big payday that they did with those first artists.

4) Controls distribution
This goes without saying.

5) Is the gatekeeper for expression
Through vertical integration that marries recording companies to the media outlets that distribute music and set what the norm is.

"EXCELLENT. BUSINESS. MOVE." -- What is good for business isn't necessarily what's good for an artform or a community.

<--All-American couple


"people on here just be like " go for it man! its sex! god forbid you turn down SEX! *dances around the baal statue*" -- Stephbit

  

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suave_bro
Member since Nov 19th 2002
9433 posts
Fri Apr-01-05 01:08 PM

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19. "then we both agree."
In response to Reply # 17
Fri Apr-01-05 01:16 PM by suave_bro

          

- that the industry really is not at fault for the downfall of the conscious MC...our moderator spoke on these things in broad general terms, i simply broke them down.

>1) Cool hunts

>--The recording industry looked for the next big thing and
>found these local artists selling thousands of independent
>records.

- uhmmm...exactly. and if gospel music was the hot shit in the streets selling thousands, gangster/thug rap would be gone 2morrow. which is what i stated.

>2) Agenda Sets

>--The recording industry decides that it will put its money
>behind Master P and not, say, Crooked Lettaz. And because the
>industry has a multi-billion dollar marketing machine, it can
>set what it thinks is "cool."

- that directly contradicts what was stated above (though u are puting YOUR words to somebody elses list i will leave that up 2 you two)...the industry capitalizes on what is ALREADY cool in the streets. which is what i described.

>3) Is responsible for market saturation
>"and they signed them!!"
>--Signed them and dozens of other copycat acts in hopes of
>making the same big payday that they did with those first
>artists.

- hopes? as a result of this the hip hop industry is a multi-billion dollar industry. the people have spoken, not the industry. the industry cant pay itself billions of dollars and sell out concerts across the country...



>"EXCELLENT. BUSINESS. MOVE." -- What is good for business
>isn't necessarily what's good for an artform or a community.

- which goes directly with what i stated earlier: if we can openly admit that the industry/media/white guys in suits are actually the ones raising our children and determines the direction in which the black community goes, then the industry will have no choice than to adhere to our demands, which is that we want more "conscious" emcees and positive songs on the airways and more positive images in our videos...anybody care to admit this to the world?

bottom line is that the industry is simply doing its job. its like getting mad @ best buy for carrying 50 cent's CD. if we are going to mad @ anybody it should be the artists and the consumers. i think deep rooted issue that is TRULY at work here is the mentallities and attitudes within our community that has created an environment where A) negroes feel 100% comfortable getting in a booth and glorifying black death and destruction, calling our women bitches and hoes and B) when the bulk of the black community craves it. we need to stop using the music industry as a scapegoat.

  

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chillsm00th
Member since Mar 25th 2005
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20. "oh, i don't think you two are very far apart at all."
In response to Reply # 19


  

          

cuz at the base what you're both talking about is the community demanding accountability from the recording industry for the images that are put out.

that's why it was funny that you posted that as a refutation.

<--All-American couple


"people on here just be like " go for it man! its sex! god forbid you turn down SEX! *dances around the baal statue*" -- Stephbit

  

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FireBrand
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21. "I found that odd as well."
In response to Reply # 20


  

          


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suave_bro
Member since Nov 19th 2002
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Tue Apr-05-05 09:51 AM

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34. "no (again)."
In response to Reply # 20


          

>cuz at the base what you're both talking about is the
>community demanding accountability from the recording industry
>for the images that are put out.

- what you are doing is reading what im saying and puting your own thoughts to it. the community isnt demanding accountability from the recording industry, where in the hell are you getting that? the community wants to get krunk. the community wants some music to ride/smoke too...the community also wants videos with tons of half naked women in it, the latest little gadgets and cars/rims, clubs etc...

show me where the community has demanded accountability from the music industry? or are u going to point to 1 or 2 small political active "groups" that dont even speak for the bulk of the black community regardless of their political affiliation...

  

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Kozmikblak
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40. "How about..."
In response to Reply # 34


  

          

The community has been indoctrinated to want sex, drugs, violence, and material riches.

The community has been feed this stuff before hip-hop in other forms of media such and movies and literature.

  

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suave_bro
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41. "so in other words black people are inferior"
In response to Reply # 40


          

the white man has our number and has had it since we first set foot on this land. he has bamboozled our minds so bad to the point where hundreds of years later, entire generations have came and went, that we are still under the white mans spell. he has and forever will have us in the palm of his hand and there is nothing we can do. oh yeah, we can talk about it...


amazingly if you have this mentallity you are considered "pro black", go figure.

  

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Kozmikblak
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42. "Urrrgghh........"
In response to Reply # 41


  

          

Hating the effing bugs on this board due to the new format. I just spent about 30min. typing a reply only click "post message" and be asked for my logon again and loose the entire reply.... ARRRRRRRGGGHH...

--------------------

"...you cats are undercover like GAY rappers dealing with MYSTERY." -Talib Kweli This means you, from Reflection Eternal

"I don't blame Tiger Woods, but I overstand the mental poison that's even worse than drugs" -nas poison

"For trees to grow in Br

  

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Kozmikblak
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43. "The short of it."
In response to Reply # 41


  

          

The music is made by the youth for the youth. The youth are very impressionable, curious, and drawn to the taboos of society. With state of our communities in the last two decades, with lack of leadership, broken families, and poverty the you have become easy pickings.

You push the revolutionary element to the side. You flash the cash, fronted cars, and fronted gear. Get cat to lie about their criminal and sexual exploits (I never seen five niggers on Elvis Presleys album- The Five Heartbeats). Life is fucked up you have to kill or be killed, get that dough my niggah, bitches ain't shit but hoes and tricks, and you soon have impressionable youth immitating art which in becomes art imitating life. A self fulfilling prophecy.

Why listen to these cats when you have PE, KRS-ONE. Simply the other cat are louder, get more air play. They are the hottest, latest, and the greatest. They also provide a peak into the spicier and sexier side of societies taboos. If you think this was not consciously done by industry capitalists you are sadly mistaken. You can build a lie up to where it will take a life of its own and become a living and breathing entity.

  

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FireBrand
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16. "noone esle has anything to say? wow."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          


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chrisdefendorf
Member since Dec 27th 2004
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18. "I talked to Chuck and PE about this same issue. (my sig refelcts it)"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

it's my belief that what really got in the way of the life of these groups in America is the sampling law controversy.

And I've had coffee with Linque (formerly ISIS) of X-Clan, and MC Lyte, and we taked about this when this was going down. (Back in 1991).

Public Enemy is HUGE around the world. In America, people are conditioned to believe that it's over for conscious hip hop.

But seriously, my sig (the we're not done/I KNOW we're not done (M/CHUCKD Interchange))
is allll about this issue.

Look at the Beatles. They were the Beatles and then they became THE BEATLES Beatles, in that Sensing.

REBIRTH HAPPENS.

Conscious hip hop? We haven't started yet. Go get a late pass (Griff).


myspace.com/raspberry

Chris Defendorf: "We're not done!" (sampling KRS-ONE & PUBLIC ENEMY "HIT THE ROAD JACKKK"

Chuck D: "I KNOW we're not done..."

PE PRODUCER Hank Shocklee on Chris & hisResonance: "inciteful" (C) HS

  

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Nettrice
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22. "Everthing is in cycles"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I interviewed Chuck D years ago for a school newspaper and he said

"Having regrets about hip-hop not doing what you want it to do is like Aunt Jemima having regrets about how she can't get any money off pancakes. We have to make sure that when we create, we can control or be able to control it from a business aspect."

I think it's important to remember what society we live in (capitalist) and who runs things, including the music we listen to. A combination of music industry strategy, payola, and MTV (media) has silenced what was once a strong representation of socio-political content in rap music. When I was a kid, I could hear Eric B. & Rakim on the radio even if only for a couple of hours on Friday night. College radio stations always played the alternative, "conscious" rap music. However, the story of what killed conscious rap is the similar to what killed jazz and r&b (nowadays r&b sounds more and more like pop). Companies only care about the bottom line and they have the eyes and ears of the masses. They push music that won't upset the status quo too much.

>Many ancient theologies and philosophies speak of something
>having to die in order to live again. One such myth is the
>story of the Phoenix that burns itself into ashes every 500
>years only to be reborn again.

I hope that in the rebirth it will not be retro. I want to hear something new.

<--- Blame this lady for Nutty.

  

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FireBrand
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23. "I wanna hear sumin new too."
In response to Reply # 22


  

          

and I agree. We have to at least have SOMEONE in the industry mindful of the art, and to be a keeper of the tradition; "to bring balance to the equation." (c) Talib Kweli
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keepemgessin
Member since Mar 28th 2005
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Sun Apr-03-05 11:00 AM

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27. "does anyone think this is bigger?"
In response to Reply # 23


  

          

Perhaps the same oppressive intent that was used w/ project housing?
It seems the music industry not only wants to make money (a given) but is willing to stop at nothing to project the image of the gangsta to ensure that a new generation of thug is not far behind. Considering that approx. 70% of hip-hop oriented cd's are purchased by non-african americans, I wouldn't say that black people are not as aware as they once were, I would say the industry is trying to make sure we have enough negativity to overshadow those who are aware, thus portraying the angry black man image to discredit anyone who may have an intelligent or positive message. They want white parents to fear it - they want little Billy to buy 50's cd, his mom to freak out, in turn prohibiting (or at least restricting) his access to BET, radio(however fowl), and hip-hop websites such as this. They want minority children to see these people as role models and follow suit. This way everybody eats - the bullshit artist, the record label, and eventually the system once little Billy and his friends catch weapons charges. Just as the FBI tried to censor Amiri Baraka and John Lennon for telling the truth, the industry is doing the same today to people who should be respected and appreciated.



"They are all potential revolutionaries..." - Mumia

  

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Chike
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28. "Really dope usage of the Nas song quotes"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

.

  

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ahmsofunky
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29. "i REALLY like this point:"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

"What has become painfully evident is that Hip Hop artists were not meant to be revolutionary leaders. They were merely supposed to supply the hook while Black revolutionaries kicked the powerful verses."

The LEADERS at hip-hop's birth fought so hard against it being birthed as an artform that they lost sight of the realities that were being expressed through it. Black leaders completely dropped the ball in the 1980's, caught up in running for office and not in addressing the issues in the community (notable exception, Mayor Harold Washington, who understood the power of the youth).

But where does it leave us now? Hip-hop is simultaneously corporatized and the vehicle through which a fair amount of wealth has come into a few hands in the community.

  

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brokenchains79
Member since Nov 22nd 2003
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Mon Apr-04-05 11:31 AM

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30. "Is it too early to mourn, is it too late to ride (c) Kweli"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

I think the hip-hop community and the academic community are closer together now than before, many of the younger academians have been influenced by hip hip. The issue now is, will academians speak to the community as well as academia, and can hip hop be an authentic voice of the community that will capture people through art. I dont think books will do it alone.

******************************
http://myspace.com/jahi
******************************
"me as a black man will not
stand here and allow you to
talk dumb shit about white
women that simply is not true"
SouthPhillyMan

  

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FireBrand
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31. "Will hop heads ACCEPT Hip Hop influenced academics?"
In response to Reply # 30


  

          

I just happen to have 'Gunshots in my Cook-up' in front of me RIGHT now, and I heard cats hate on folk like Hinds ALOT in the past.

As well as Dyson. These are people who love, and listen to hip hop that happen to be "academics" (hinds is more of a journalist, but still).

They don't get no love.


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<---- It'll cure what ails ya...

  

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brokenchains79
Member since Nov 22nd 2003
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Tue Apr-05-05 11:41 AM

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37. "I think so, if they are not seen as living a different reality...."
In response to Reply # 31


  

          

I mean, how many folks are really relating to dyson like that, what language is he speaking that folks will wanna hear. He'll appeal to the book readers and the lecture circuit... but I dont think the streets were hearing him, the streets dont want to hear any academic sterileness.

******************************
http://myspace.com/jahi
******************************
"me as a black man will not
stand here and allow you to
talk dumb shit about white
women that simply is not true"
SouthPhillyMan

  

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FireBrand
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39. "I'm hearing him. I know my brother, and cousins hear him."
In response to Reply # 37
Tue Apr-05-05 11:59 AM by FireBrand

  

          

Everybody aint street. I'm about as street as the Atlanta suburbs I grew up in. I aint trying to hear simple street jargon. It has it's appeal, but so does Dyson.

I'm not a thug, I'ma citizen.


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brokenchains79
Member since Nov 22nd 2003
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Wed Apr-06-05 10:08 AM

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44. "RE: I'm hearing him. I know my brother, and cousins hear him."
In response to Reply # 39


  

          

>Everybody aint street. I'm about as street as the Atlanta suburbs I
> grew up in.

But the streets, or the impoverished black community is where the most victimization occurs.

>I aint trying to hear simple street jargon.

Street jargon isn't necessarily simple, and people in the street respond to things that they see in their reality, in a language they understand and relate to. They gotta see you in the struggle, meaning they gotta see you where they are at, not a seperate entity.


>It has it's appeal, but so does Dyson.

Appeal is relative. Khalid Muhammad didn't appeal to alot of blacks, nor did MLK, or Malcolm. But the one they did appeal to are the ones they worked with and vice versa. I'm not a thug, I'ma citizen.

******************************
http://myspace.com/jahi
******************************
"me as a black man will not
stand here and allow you to
talk dumb shit about white
women that simply is not true"
SouthPhillyMan

  

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FireBrand
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45. "I think that people forget about educated Rural"
In response to Reply # 44


  

          

and suburban communities. In a lot of ways we are on the front lines of social interaction but we still have similar stigmas to our urban brethren.

We all black in the system's eyes, and while there are a set of advantages there are also a set of disadvantages. If you have a brother like a West, a Dyson that can speak to these communities, these Afrikans that have a very different experience than many Urban brothers and sisters...how can you discount them cus they aint speaking your language?

Is THAT much lost in semantic noise? When I read Wilson, or Clarke I see similar prevailing themes in Dyson and West's work.

Are they just lumped in because of West's relationship with Gates? Is that fair?


******************************
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<---- It'll cure what ails ya...

  

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brokenchains79
Member since Nov 22nd 2003
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Thu Apr-07-05 11:48 AM

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50. "I'm not being divisive at all..."
In response to Reply # 45


  

          

I was just speaking of hip hop academics being recognized by the streets because hip hop has been mostly associated with the streets throughout every stage of its existence. I'm not saying anything to the exclusion of suburban or rural black folks, just saying how Dyson may be looked at from a certain population in which he is using an artform that grew out of the population. The struggle is real no matter where you are, the dynamics are just different in some cases.


******************************
http://myspace.com/jahi
******************************
"me as a black man will not
stand here and allow you to
talk dumb shit about white
women that simply is not true"
SouthPhillyMan

  

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FireBrand
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51. "True, but it's rural and suburban hip hop heads too..."
In response to Reply # 50


  

          

And most teens, and young people in those areas need a voice that can speak to them as well. You can't approach Thomas fro Alpharetta, Georgia who is in a 80% white school with a Baruti book or a Clarke Book off the top. However, his minister just might hand him a Dyson book and that might be his introduction into looking at Hip hop, indeed his WORLD in a very different way.

"For me, hip -hop is not simply the oral articulation of a specific moment of black cultural expression among young people. It's also a profound lesson in how verbal creativity is joined to, perhaps revealed in, the lyrical imagination that UNDERWRITES rap music. I think that lyrical imagination is a powerful form of the narrativity that is crucial to the construction of black idendies in postmodernity. Writing, as an art and artifact--and as the process of critical assertion that French intellectuals call ecriture, and you see my debt to this concept in my term, Afreciture-- becomes a bridge of articulation among and between cultures. It's also a way, of course, of reinventing the very shape and texture of life experience in the crucible of textuality, that is, in the unavoidably semiotic character of what Socrates thought of as the examined life. ...writing is both writing INTO and writing FROM." (c) Dyson.


When you look at the above statement one thing that pops out are reference to European thought and scholars, but those are mere (and perhaps unecessary) book marks in a idea that speaks to validate hip-hop to the unconvinced of it's tie to community, tradition and values.

What is implied here, I belive is the value of Afrikan intellectualism and approach to literacy. This is something that would appeal very differently to the average educated brotha from the streets, and the average educated rural brotha especially when you consider regional differences and culural mores.

I see it as if u had that community of God church in Christ brother from Peach County that listens to hip hop on the low but sees it as a quiet vice. He's been approached by some learned brothers from a more aggressive sect of Pan-Afrikan nationalism and it turns him off. He's not ready to shun the cradle of what has been his conditioning...but a statement like the one above by Dyson? That can open a whole new world where other ideas now have a measure of perspective that were once off limits, and now seem benign.

namean?

or I'm I off topic?

That's what I get from the Theo Coker's, and the Hinds, and of the West's, and the Dyson's. They are seeking to use current intellectual structures used in this society to support what could be termed as more nebulous (although that is a misnomer) AFRIKAN thoughts and ideas. extending a hand to folk who normally wouldn't get there...I know that's how I got started.

Blacks and Jews by Michael Lerner and Cornell West was my introduction into race, class, and political discourse.



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<---- It'll cure what ails ya...

  

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brokenchains79
Member since Nov 22nd 2003
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Thu Apr-07-05 11:46 PM

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54. "I feel you..."
In response to Reply # 51


  

          

but even the rural and suburban hip hop heads struggle in trying to connect to the "streets". I mean even southern hip hop represented the streets just in a different sense. I believe hip hop needs alot more diversity than street macho (which i think is bs anyway).

******************************
http://myspace.com/jahi
******************************
"me as a black man will not
stand here and allow you to
talk dumb shit about white
women that simply is not true"
SouthPhillyMan

  

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urthanheaven
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Tue Apr-05-05 12:28 AM

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32. "i'm trying to be conscious..."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

sometimes i just don't know what to say, or what to believe in, or how best to use the audiences short attention span. my whole verse is like, read a book. look after your health. know your history. don't believe everything the tells you. love your fellow wo/man. look before you leap. think before you speak.... and somewhere in there they switch to commercial, or so goes the fear.

saying that i think i can defeat it, but it's very hard to be a 'conscious' mc. look at how many different views there are on acivist, and how quick dudes pull out imaginary digital cannons on someone with a different oppinion... it's getting better. i think we're getting more concise. i think it's coming soon.

i know i'm not alone. when i get these beats tight, get my rhymes right. grab the microphone and rip open heads like pop tops. hearts wide open until the beat stops.

i guess that other quote still applies, that hip hop and the concsious mc live inside of each and every one of us. right or wrong, i would listen to an album written by many of the heads on activist and walk away with food for thought, so ya'll go out there and do it your damn self ok?

overwhelm them. from the inside.

ok

  

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poetx
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33. "we need to mourn the death of the consciousness within us."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

loved the article, but two quick points.

1) i agree that the whole 'conscious' movement within hiphop was deaded, in part, by the corporate music industry. i think 'wake up' by brand nubian was really the tipping point for that. remember the spin article that pointed out that white folks were singing about the devil (heavy metal) and black folks were rapping about god (well, that we were gods, via nge influence). you think a cracka in his right mind is going to let that continue?

we see, with the roots/mca/geffen, as prime examples, what one's label can do (or not do) with respect to getting an artist out there. even a respected artist with an established fanbase. the structure of this music industry, which has only consolidated since the late eighties (thanks to reagan an thems degregulation orgy) serves to allow it to act in its general interest.

yes. there were certainly other significant cultural dynamics that led to the ascension of the west coast, and gangsta rap, but the premature death of 'conscious' hip hop was certainly NOT a phenomenon of market forces alone.

2) even if corporate america helped 'pull the plug' on conscious rap, bringing it back is not as simple as plugging it back in. we now have a generation shaped and molded to appreciate certain things and devalue others. when we, as a community, were in the middle, philosophically, it may have been possible for a persuasive artist to help tip us, either way. but now? change won't come unless we change the culture at the grass roots. ain't no rapper/can't no rapper come on the scene and flip things back to the way they were in '89, because the people are too far gone.

3) we need to realize the fact that 'consciousness' was a phase of hip hop, not it's identity. it's painful for those of us who love the music AND have as a goal the upliftment of black people, but it's true. there's nothing wrong with the music, as black music has historically done, reflecting some of our aims and aspirations, and communicating our best hopes and dreams. but that will not come at the expense of shaking asses, as that's simply ahistorical.

alternative media (*cough* internet *cough*) and other means of communication and connection will have to be used to foment this change in collective consciousness. it will simply not come about through the existing corporate media structure, because they have the power to veto that shit and can be trusted to operate in their own interest.

4) lessons learned need to be done. a lot of 'conscious' emcees weren't conscious. they were merely following the fad. as fads go, it was a nice fad to have, but a lot of them cats had no idea what they were talking about and no real depth or committment. the movement seemed larger than it was as a consequence. also, very few can pull off the artist/activist role with equal aplomb. chuck d is one of the few who was highly respected as someone with a valuable message and (for a time) was one of the best in his craft. for many others, they ended up with the sista souljah syndrome. she was a committed activist and organizer. but a rapper? nah. then you had numerous bandwagoners who dipped they shit in a little red, black & green to keep sellin, but weren't really saying much of anything.

a mass of artists who are educated politically, culturally, AND practice their craft at a high level, AND, are equipped to deal with the character assassination that will come from stepping up and being a threat to the status quo? i don't see that happening. this is kinda like the failure of the post-civil rights movement in microcosm (ie, the failure of charismatic leadership - prone to assassination, scandal, sabotage, etc).

next time around, we gonna need to bring the grassroots up to certain level. unfortunately, hip hop, at least as distributed through the major media channels, is NOT gonna be the tool to do that. if we can build networks and use underground distribution, it can certainly help. but them ninjas ain't gonna be charting on billboard.

as always brother, much respect to your committment to the struggle.

peace & blessings,

x.

"I'm on the Zoloft to keep from killing y'all." - Iron Mike

my philosophy on free time:
"and next time when he get it he'll waste it on somethin' useful" - MF Doom

  

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FireBrand
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35. "I think the key here is that there is a new gerneration of"
In response to Reply # 33


  

          

Activist, and that I don't know that there is music being developed for them. There are a few artists out there that make music that speaks to them, but are they being nurtured? Loved? where is their scene.

DOn't they just get washed up in the boho/intellectual movement with no real substance.


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brokenchains79
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Tue Apr-05-05 11:38 AM

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36. "Good reply..."
In response to Reply # 33


  

          

In a recent conversation someone was talking about how Queen Latifah used to be "conscious" and how she has "soldout". I pretty much maintained that she was just following the wave, you dont necessarily have to be profound to sing U-N-I-T-Y.

In a recent interview Farrakhan was commenting on when he was attacked in the media for being anti-semetic and he stated his reason for going "underground" and not talking to any media. He said he was working on building his roots so deep in the community that no matter how much the media will attack him in the future they wouldn't be able to phase him because he would not be a product of the media but of the community... what I got from that was, things done on the grassroots level, where you are affecting people where you live in progressive ways, outsides forces of manipulation will be less affective to the people in the community.

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FireBrand
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38. "Exactly. You can see that when people talk about"
In response to Reply # 36


  

          

"Frindge" folks like a OJ or Jacko. First thing out alot folks mouths is that "they aint really black". Well, what does that mean? It means they aren't involved.

So, you think hip hop has to be more grassroots? I think it would be dope to have more intimate setting shows, and to have artists to more than just benefits concerts to make a change.

Gettin in there and gettin they hands dirty. I'm sure it happens, but I don't know about it.

And that's the key. That's how you can begin to nurture the minds that leave hip hop behind becaues they feel it don't speak to 'em.

That might be the key to bringing balance.

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MALACHI
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46. "I'll tell you the DAY conscious Hip-Hop started to die:"
In response to Reply # 0
Wed Apr-06-05 06:34 PM by MALACHI

  

          

December 15th, 1992. The day Dr. Dre dropped "The Chronic" album. On that album is a song called "Let Me Ride"...we all have heard it. I am a FIRM believer that this song was a PIVOTAL catalyst of the downward spiral Hip-Hop has been in for YEARS.

The second verse begins:

"Just another motherf_ckin day for Dre, so I begin like this
No medallions, dreadlocks or Black fists
It's just that gangster glare, with gangster raps
That gangster sh_t, that makes a gang of snaps
Word to these motherf_ckin streets,
And word to these hype a__ lyrics and dope beats
That I hit ya with
That I get ya with..."

This song comes out and blantantly says I am not about Black consciousness...I'm about self destructive gangsterism...and hundreds of thousands of US bought into this idiotic paradigm shift. Death Row records preceded No Limit, which preceded Cash Money, which preceded all the rest of these hustler, gangster, player, thugster, pimp-cup carrying, sell-out idiots. All of them are the bastard children of The Chronic album.

Yep. December 15th, 1992...the day Hip-Hop LOST IT'S MIND.

PEACE

*waits on the Dre jock-riders*

"Is it not one father that all of us have? Is it not one God that has created us? Why is it that we deal treacherously with one another?" --Malachi 2:10

  

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FireBrand
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48. "But that same day there were a million other songs out"
In response to Reply # 46


  

          

saying something very different. There were songs with pro-black rhetoric. Why did the people embrace Dre's message and not Guru?

I'm sayin...it's gotta be deeper than that.

The pro-black shit I can agree was a fad just like the gangsta shit was a fad.

The thing is that fads in hip hop sitll managed to keep a strong voice in the throng. There were still champions of different "sounds" that got love universally.

U can look at a Biggie Video and see Luke (from bootyshake/bass music fame), Heavy D (from that mountvernon/new jack swing positive party ish fame), Hard core rappers, etc in there just cold lampin.

But where is the love for the conscious emcee? Why are they a pariah?

I mean certainly there were folk hating on west coast gangster shit, and on east coast smilie shit. In the south I heard folk hate on that shit for YEARS cus they couldn't relate to alot of that shit. The fuck 5% jargon mean to a Baptist Preacher's Kid?

so, in a longwinded way I'm sayin WHY is it that the POSITIVE voices are PURPOSELY silenced? Why did Eminem have to stop making positive music and come out like a angry lil white kid from the hood?

why did that have to happen?




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MALACHI
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53. "I have a theory..."
In response to Reply # 48
Thu Apr-07-05 04:54 PM by MALACHI

  

          

>There were songs with
>pro-black rhetoric. Why did the people embrace Dre's message
>and not Guru?
>
>I'm sayin...it's gotta be deeper than that.
You know what I think it is, Brother? I think it's a couple of things. It's EASIER to listen to that mindless trash...EASIER to listen to stuff that appeals to your carnal desires. You mentioned Guru...what is "easier" to listen to, Gangstarr asking the question "Who's Gonna Take The Weight?" where they are talking about "each one teaching one" and "becoming a strong nation", or the mindless stuff them "G-Funk" cats were talking about? Fast money, fast women, fancy lowrider cars, and all the weed you can smoke. The former is telling us we need to get to WORK...the latter is nothing but hustle up some money, get some gin and juice, smoke you some bud, and before the night is over, a big-booty b_tch is gonna screw you and suck you all night long. To brothers who have no knowledge of self, and don't have an interest in learning it, what is going to be most appealing?

>But where is the love for the conscious emcee? Why are they a
>pariah?
Like I just said man, if you are a lazy-minded person, you don't want to spent "leisure" time listening to somebody talking about books you need to read, people you should know about, togetherness in the community, getting an education...etc. I remember when my cousin (who is now in his early 30's, has been in and out of jail since he was 17, never graduated high school, and is STILL claiming "piru") moved to Dallas from Miami in like '89, he was all into 2 Live Crew. When he rode in the car with me, that trash wasn't getting played. I was a P.E. FANATIC back in those days, I used to listen to "Nation of Millions" AT LEAST once a day. My cousin used to say "Maaaaan, I don't see how you listen to this all the time...n_igga, if I wanna get preached to "I'll go TO CHURCH..." As sad as it is to admit, everybody isn't concerned about the same things you and I are.

>In the south I heard
>folk hate on that shit for YEARS cus they couldn't relate to
>alot of that shit. The fuck 5% jargon mean to a Baptist
>Preacher's Kid?
I went through similar experiences here in Texas...cats saying they can't "relate" to "East Coast" hip-hop...they didn't even know what the M.C.s were talking about...ESPECIALLY M.C.s whose lyrics reflected their 5%er "knowledge". I remember my brother and I used to catch GRIEF because we LOVED Brand Nubian's "Wake Up,(Reprise in the Sunshine"...and almost everybody here in town HATED IT. Especially when Maxwell ran down the Supreme Mathematics in the song. Cats would be like: "N_gga, what is dat nigga talkin' 'bout?!?!? Dat n_igga ain't talkin' bout sh_t!!!" I always would ask them why they could "relate" to "West Coast" gangbanger mentality...especially when cats I knew who grew up in middle class neighborhoods and went to the same suburban schools I did started claiming sets. How is it that you have never BEEN TO SOUTH-CENTRAL L.A., but you are claiming Rolling 60's Crips? I'm telling you, the "death" of hip-hop consciousness is a manifestation of the ignorance far too many of us a people embrace.


>Why did Eminem have to stop
>making positive music and come out like a angry lil white kid
>from the hood?
When was blondie making "positive" music? I must have missed that.

"Is it not one father that all of us have? Is it not one God that has created us? Why is it that we deal treacherously with one another?" --Malachi 2:10

  

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G_Smooth
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47. "Rawkus records never birthed any consciousness"
In response to Reply # 0


          

HipHop ain't nutting than another entity in capitalistic exploitation....

  

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FireBrand
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49. "they had jailbirds on they team. of course not."
In response to Reply # 47


  

          

that backpaker shit is wack, yo. who gonna relate to that shit? who?

I mean Mos, Kweli and Monch are FIYA, but they aint like them other back packer soundin, I made the beats in my basement ass folk.

namean?

I don't wanna hear nonsense, I want a story I can apply to my life, my struggle, and my experience.

Them kids gonna have to realize there aint no more glory days. U speaking to a GLOBE now, not just a block. I mean certainly it HAS to begin with who you are and the block can be a big part of that...but it don't gotta end there.

and that's why I can't stand niggas hatin on the roots. The messages in a great many of they songs is SO powerful, and the music is so forward thinking and niggas wanna hate cus it aint what they bought the last time.

get outta here with that.
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queenisisdivine
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Thu Apr-07-05 02:08 PM

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52. "RE: Rawkus records never birthed any consciousness"
In response to Reply # 47


  

          

So true.


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