Go back to previous topic
Forum namePass The Popcorn
Topic subject...A well-thought and logical post?
Topic URLhttp://board.okayplayer.com/okp.php?az=show_topic&forum=6&topic_id=290990&mesg_id=292582
292582, ...A well-thought and logical post?
Posted by ActWon, Tue Jun-19-07 02:17 PM
TO THE SARLAC PIT WITH HER!

>there's an element of fantasy-make-believe in the madea
>series. the audience has to make a leap into madea world in
>order for things to be plausible. certain rules (ex:
>attractive men) are in play when it comes to madea world and
>as a viewer, you either accept them or you don't. obviously,
>madea world isn't real life. you've pointed out a few reasons
>why it's not reality. i think everyone understands that it's
>not real life, even if only on a subconscious level. i don't
>think that the fantastic elements of the stories make the
>instructive value of them idealistic.
>
>>All three of his films were surrounding a love story, the
>man
>>involved is always perfect in any way.
>
>i wouldn't go that far. i'd say that the men in the romantic
>roles aren't perfect in every way, but in the ways that count.
>they apparently have an interest in treating women with
>respect.
>
>instructive: recognize the bad. recognize the good.
>instructive: bad "acts" this way. good "acts" this way.
>instructive: people can choose bad or good.
>instructive: are you choosing bad or good?
>instructive: choose good.
>
>the goodness of the male characters has nothing to do with
>their looks and everything to do with their actions. the bad
>male characters aren't exactly ugly, either. the attractive
>male phenomena is part of what happens in madea world. it's a
>device...but it's also another chance to instruct: appearances
>can be deceiving so it's important to be able to recognize
>good and bad.
>
>grant it, maybe there are some women who may come away from
>the films believing that there's a connection between a guy's
>ability to show goodness with their money and looks. maybe the
>stories encourage shallow mating preferences and unreasonable
>amounts of wish-fulfillment and lots of trouble for the guy
>who ends up dating a black woman with such silly ideas filling
>her head. maybe. but there doesn't seem to be anything in the
>films to suggest that women should focus their energies on
>finding a man who's hot or rich/hot and rich. in fact, some of
>the women in the stories who use the "sexy w/ a bank account"
>screening method end up being quite unhappy.
>
>at any rate, i don't think it's an idealistic viewpoint that
>women should protect themselves and learn how to choose mates
>who demonstrate good qualities. is the lesson presented in a
>hokey, corny, manner? yes.
>
>>Shemar Moore, Boris
>>Kudjoe and Idris Elba were all blue collar workers with a
>>heart of gold and near the end the woman gets a brain and
>>decides to deal with the dude who in real life wouldn't get
>>play from the women that support the film.
>
>then maybe people aren't getting the moral of the story!
>
>but then again, maybe it's the second rate presentation that
>makes the moral of the story un-seeable and easily
>misunderstood.
>
>>Its a Sesame Street
>>lesson for grown black women and Madea is Big Bird.
>
>the simplicity/transparency of the story lines don't bother
>me. children don't always get solid moral instruction and they
>grow up to become adults who make decisions without the
>benefit of it. simplicity is a very effective way to build up
>people's confidence with the basics. what bothers me is that
>the storylines are developed in a way that makes any kind of
>message seem trite.
>
>