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Forum nameThe Lesson
Topic subjecthits that were completely atypical of their era
Topic URLhttp://board.okayplayer.com/okp.php?az=show_topic&forum=5&topic_id=2532331
2532331, hits that were completely atypical of their era
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 09:33 AM
ideally if you come up with one, explain why it was atypical; compare/contrast it with other hits from the same year/period.

If we feel like running with it, we can then examine WHY it became a hit when it didn't sound like anything else popular at that time.

Or don't do any of that and just name a song in your reply line. Whatever.
2532350, Got anything in mind?
Posted by dalecooper, Thu Mar-31-11 09:53 AM
Seems like an interesting topic but off the top of my head, I got nothin'.
2532352, Aren't you supposed to kick it off?
Posted by AFKAP_of_Darkness, Thu Mar-31-11 09:58 AM
I'm not sure I completely understand the premise...

Do you mean stuff like "Come On Eileen"?
2532356, LOL
Posted by Dr Claw, Thu Mar-31-11 10:02 AM
such an AFKAPpy answer... but yeah. That was '82, wasn't it?
that year is kind of "different" in the 1980s. Perhaps my favorite year of music period.
2532447, 1982 is probably my fave music year too.
Posted by AFKAP_of_Darkness, Thu Mar-31-11 11:26 AM
Well... one of them, anyway. It's definitely WAY up on the list.
2532457, I can't tell u how funny it is to see u say that all these years later lol
Posted by OldPro, Thu Mar-31-11 11:32 AM

_________________________________
Reunion Radio Podcasts
Bringing Together Five Decades of R&B/Funk/Soul/Dance

http://reunionradio.blogspot.com/

Latest episode- Slave Tribute (RIP Mark L. Adams)
2532856, Oh trust: I am fully aware of the irony. BUT
Posted by AFKAP_of_Darkness, Thu Mar-31-11 08:53 PM
to be fair, even back then I said that that era had powerful emotional resonance for me on a personal level but I strongly disagreed with your assertion that it was "the golden age of Black music" lol
2532379, I *do* have a job
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 10:22 AM
as for Come on Eileen, let's see the argument.

I'd say it's not completely atypical, as other white groups devoted to interpretations of classic R&B sounds moved in a pop direction and scored big hits (J. Geils Band) around the same time.

The explicitly Irish too-rye-aye could be argued to be unique, but then I'd cite the similarity between Geils's chorus to Centerfold and the Irish sing-along 'The Rattlin' Bog.'
2532424, Fiddles and banjos though?
Posted by AFKAP_of_Darkness, Thu Mar-31-11 11:08 AM
Who was doing THAT?
2532438, I know you're capable of fleshing out an argument, my man
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 11:22 AM
2532472, okay, I just watched the video to refresh my memory
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 11:43 AM
1. Aside from the opening fiddle line, the fiddles occupy the role of the string section, which was not far outdated in 1982;

2. The banjo's generally inaudible; I have my doubts that a real banjo was actually used on the song, since the 'banjo solo' sounds more like a pre-Midi-fied banjo synth effect. I did find a live performance that wasn't lip-synched and uses a banjo though so I guess it was really used.

3. The video also shows accordion and tea-chest bass, neither of which are audible on the song as well and likely weren't rreally used.

In other words, the trappings that were atypical of the time were just that - trappings, visual aids rather than musical ones, at least in the final product.
2532568, All the instruments on that song are real, man!
Posted by AFKAP_of_Darkness, Thu Mar-31-11 01:19 PM
You need to listen to their full albums (lol) and watch some live footage. They were hardcore with their shit!

Actually, an even more atypical "hit" (I think it was a moderate one) came from a Dexy's spinoff group called Blue Ox Babes.

I think this is pretty oddball for 1988: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKUb7KorZfs

2532572, tea chest bass, though, man?
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 01:25 PM
even if it IS on there, my point is: listen to that song, and it at least sounds fairly standard, instrumentation-wise at least. You can barely hear the banjo, and I can't pick out any identifiable accordion.

>You need to listen to their full albums (lol) and watch some
>live footage. They were hardcore with their shit!

I actually have a CDR of Young Soul Rebels in my car that a friend burned a gave to me last fall. Haven't gotten around to listening to it, though.

>Actually, an even more atypical "hit" (I think it was a
>moderate one) came from a Dexy's spinoff group called Blue Ox
>Babes.
>
>I think this is pretty oddball for 1988:
>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKUb7KorZfs

Read about ;em. I'll try to check it out.

2532586, I hear you.
Posted by AFKAP_of_Darkness, Thu Mar-31-11 01:36 PM
2532357, completely?
Posted by SoWhat, Thu Mar-31-11 10:05 AM
i can think of hits that were atypical of their genre in their particular era (Herbie Hancock, 'Rockit'). but none that were atypical of anything else happening anywhere in music.
2532382, the songs that seemed to come out of nowhere
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 10:26 AM
I used Fast Car below because there had been no indication of acoustic music's hitmaking potential in the '80s. I've got a few others lined up.

Generally though I'm looking for songs that were successful despite the fact that there was no aesthetic equivalent in the pop charts at the time. When you think of '80s pop music, even if this song crosses your mind amidst the Safety Dances and Like a Virgins, it's likely to be the only song that sounds the way it does.

In soe cases those songs might be the ONLY pop hits to have had that aesthetic, and in other cases they might have opened the flood gates for a new pop music. ie you could argue for Smells Like Teen Spirit, though there could easily be arguments against it.

*shrug*
2532386, then: 'Rappers Delight'.
Posted by SoWhat, Thu Mar-31-11 10:29 AM
2532395, an obvious choice for sure
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 10:33 AM
the only argument I can conceive against it is that it sampled a song that was already (and recently) a well known hit so prominently and identifiably.
2532358, "I know I can" - Nas
Posted by kevb, Thu Mar-31-11 10:05 AM
2532371, Fast Car (Tracy Chapman, April 1988)
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 10:16 AM
While the charts were dominated by teen pop and hair metal, and rock fans mostly remember the '80s for labels like SST, the '80s singer/songwriter revival was mostly a non-mainstream affair, the domain of labels like Flying Fish and Rounder and eventually Windham Hill.

There had been some indication of its hit potential earlier as Suzanne Vega's 'Luka' made a bit of noise, but there's more sheen and 'pop/rock' production on that one song than there is on the entire Tracy Chapman debut.

Fast Car is at its heart a pop strong with impeccable structure and melody, but it's the sparse 'folk' production that makes it stand out as completely different from anything on the charts in those days.
2532390, absolutely agreed.
Posted by Dr Claw, Thu Mar-31-11 10:31 AM
>Fast Car is at its heart a pop strong with impeccable
>structure and melody, but it's the sparse 'folk' production
>that makes it stand out as completely different from anything
>on the charts in those days.

either my mother or my aunt (her youngest sister) had bought the album and we played that (and Bobby McFerrin's album) between Charlotte and Indiana that year on a ride home... totally left field of what was out there in that time, across genres.
2532400, don't worry, be happy is another choice
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 10:39 AM

>either my mother or my aunt (her youngest sister) had bought
>the album and we played that (and Bobby McFerrin's album)
>between Charlotte and Indiana that year on a ride home...
>totally left field of what was out there in that time, across
>genres.

I mean... an a capella reggae joint? I can't imagine that EVER not being a chart non-sequitur.

And neither can the fake bass (fish, not isntrument) someone gave my dad that sings it when you push the button. Thankfully it's stored in the basement.


Chapman (like Vega) actually came out of the vibrant Fast Folk-led singer-songwriter scene; there were lots of people doing what she was doing (though not nearly as many as there would be in a few years). but the fact that a major label would take a chance on her and score a major hit - several, even - was surprising as hell at the time, and the only other acoustic act* to reach anything close to that level of chart success since has been Indigo Girls.

*of course the Acoustic Joint has long been a staple of rock band repertoires, but it seems to me there was a noticeable uptick in quality following 'Fast Car' - GnR 'Patience' and Green Day 'Time of My Life' both being far superior to '80s dreck like 'Five Man Acoustical Jam.'
2532921, Funny thing that fish.....
Posted by denny, Fri Apr-01-11 01:03 AM
I just saw it in the documentary on Lemmy. He's got one in his bathroom. Watched his leathered snarl turn into a bright smile after hitting it.
2532919, Am I the only one
Posted by Wendell, Fri Apr-01-11 12:54 AM
who would get the beginning of this song mixed up with "Jack and Diane"?

But still a good choice...
2532984, never thought of that, but I could see it
Posted by lonesome_d, Fri Apr-01-11 09:02 AM
2532385, Sly & The Family Stone "Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin)"
Posted by BootyGreen, Thu Mar-31-11 10:28 AM
This song sounded nothing like any other soul or funk song that was on the air at the time of it's release in December of '69. Most of the funk/hard soul out at that time was working from the JB template of staccato horns and hollerin' on the lead vocal. The vocals on this song were chanted in unison. The accent on the rhythm provided by Mr. Grahams thumb made this jam a harbinger of things to come in the world of funk.


_______________________________________
"I whipped him with a switch and a belt. I never beat him. You beat someone with a stick." - Joe Jackson
2532389, I agree and often think that song sounds more like 1973
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 10:31 AM
good choice, good choice

I was going to questions whether it was a true HIT but yes, it reached #1 on both Soul charts and the Billboard Hot 100. Which surprises me b/c I never really heard it growing up on classic rock or oldies radio.
2532387, 'Cold Sweat', James Brown.
Posted by SoWhat, Thu Mar-31-11 10:29 AM
at least according to some musicians who were working at the time.
2532397, Jay-Z's 'Roc Boys' sounded like nothings else on popular radio..
Posted by The Analyst, Thu Mar-31-11 10:37 AM
I remember being in the car with some people who were listing to "JAMIN94.5" or "HOT106" (Boston/Providence stations) or some shit and like 15 songs in a row were autotune-hooks and minimalist keyboard beats with synth blips and fake 808 drum sounds. Then Jay-Z comes on with fairly lush and organic sounding instrumentation with (REAL!) horns blaring all over the place...and...he was actually rapping!

I'm not even sure this would classify for what you're looking for, because content-wise it wasn't outside the realm of what's typical for post-2000s hip-hop, but it didn't SOUND like anything else that was out at the time. The only reason it flew was that it was Jay-Z, and there are really only a handful of people who can put out whatever they want and the radios still have to play it and he's one of em.

(To be honest: Izzo, 99 Problems, and DOA are other Jay-Z songs that also didn't sound anything like anything else on the radio at the time either...and that's what this is about right? hits?)
2532401, it's all about the interpretation, and you make a good argument
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 10:41 AM
2532402, That's a really good one..
Posted by Brew, Thu Mar-31-11 10:44 AM
I like this topic but couldn't come up with anything. But Roc Boys is certainly a good argument. I'm gonna give this some more thought. But amongst all the auto-tune bullshit, you're right in that Jay took a fairly basic hiphop formula and made it a hit amongst all that other stuff.
2532404, Jay-Z had done the same w/the Blueprint singles as well
Posted by Dr Claw, Thu Mar-31-11 10:48 AM
"Girls, Girls, Girls" was not a representative of the "hot" sounds of 2001, yet...
2532410, That's true.
Posted by Brew, Thu Mar-31-11 10:55 AM
The Blueprint definitely changed the overall mainstream landscape. It was nothing that hadn't been done before but it took it back into the soul sampling direction for sure.
2532418, I don't have any examples but
Posted by loki2stunt, Thu Mar-31-11 11:03 AM
i think you going overboard with that one
2532407, The Girl from Ipanema (1964)
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 10:51 AM
We tend to think of the '60s, especially once the British Invasion had begun, firmly as the domain of Rock, Soul, and maybe girl groups and bubblegum.

So in the midst of Beatlemania, how bizarre was it for this tune sung partly in Portuguese to take over the world?

I'm having a hard time finding accurate chart positions for it but there's no denying its lasting impact and the short-lived bossa-nova craze it kicked off.

I attribute its success partly to its AOR appeal, appeal to the same crowd that was still rocking Nat King Cole and maybe Tennessee Ernie Ford records... the style is not at all the same but it fit neatly into an Easy Listening type of setting.

One thing I don't know is whether the same stations that were playing the pop songs of the day for teens were also playing this. Anyone have insight?
2533550, this is a great fuckin example
Posted by blackrussian, Sat Apr-02-11 03:59 PM
and apologies for not having any other concrete evidence to add on, but i at least agree!
2532412, Arrested Development - Tennesee
Posted by c71, Thu Mar-31-11 10:57 AM
Badu - on and on
2532414, I'd like to see your argument for Tennessee
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 10:59 AM
2532421, Speach's sing song style, Speach's lyrical spiritual angle
Posted by c71, Thu Mar-31-11 11:05 AM
Farris singing, that whole combo
2532454, Is Tennessee the first hop hop hit to contain basically no rapping?
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 11:29 AM
2532461, interesting question
Posted by c71, Thu Mar-31-11 11:39 AM
Art of noise - "beat box", perhaps?
2532432, the majority of Outkast's hits
Posted by Government Name, Thu Mar-31-11 11:17 AM
2533102, I would say Hey Ya in particular though n/m
Posted by speakeasy, Fri Apr-01-11 12:29 PM
The other hits were at least raps records.

--
Outta line like titties in the open. The system of industry is kitty-litter ocean. - CH

twitter dot com slash onejdunn
2532458, Would Taco's Puttin on the Ritz count?
Posted by OldPro, Thu Mar-31-11 11:33 AM

_________________________________
Reunion Radio Podcasts
Bringing Together Five Decades of R&B/Funk/Soul/Dance

http://reunionradio.blogspot.com/

Latest episode- Slave Tribute (RIP Mark L. Adams)
2532464, Prince When Doves Cry
Posted by OldPro, Thu Mar-31-11 11:39 AM
Who was dropping a song with no bass on black radio 84?
_________________________________
Reunion Radio Podcasts
Bringing Together Five Decades of R&B/Funk/Soul/Dance

http://reunionradio.blogspot.com/

Latest episode- Slave Tribute (RIP Mark L. Adams)
2532583, I'm trying to think of a suitable response
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 01:33 PM
>Who was dropping a song with no bass on black radio 84?

imho it's not the lack of bass that makes it so different, it's the utter... metallicness? Coldness? of it.

It's really the perfect atmosphere for the song/melody, and one I can't think of having heard elsewhere ever.
2532594, I remember the first time I heard it
Posted by OldPro, Thu Mar-31-11 01:43 PM
We got the promo single in a shipment and we're expecting some Let's Work type shit... the thing I remember most is how weird we all thought it sounded. The missing bass was what jumped out after about a minute in. The other strange thing about it was it sounded slower to me that it actually was. I heard it as a 115-118 bpm track when it fact it was 128. I usually have a good ear for that sort of thing but this cut totally threw me off.
_________________________________
Reunion Radio Podcasts
Bringing Together Five Decades of R&B/Funk/Soul/Dance

http://reunionradio.blogspot.com/

Latest episode- Slave Tribute (RIP Mark L. Adams)
2532566, Billy Joel - For The Longest Time
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Thu Mar-31-11 01:14 PM
2532575, Nice! Yeah, doo-wop wasn't exactly in style then
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 01:27 PM
it's funny b/c (unlike a lot of you guys) I remember "'80s music" as being pretty homogeneous.

But most of what we're coming up with is from that timeline and reveals a pretty eclectic palette.
2532630, right, a lot of Billy Joel's songs in that vein in that era
Posted by Dr Claw, Thu Mar-31-11 02:18 PM
were pretty much to the left of typical '80s music...
yet that's one of the first things I remember about that age
2532567, Bobby McFerrin - Don't Worry, Be Happy
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Thu Mar-31-11 01:15 PM
2532573, #16
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 01:26 PM
2532579, yeah, i posted after only reading your original post.
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Thu Mar-31-11 01:30 PM
2532582, jeeze, who made you a mod?
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 01:31 PM
all in good fun, my friend!
2532576, The Clipse - Grindin'
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Thu Mar-31-11 01:29 PM
2532730, I'm just now seeing you said this...yep
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Thu Mar-31-11 04:21 PM
2532581, You Can Call Me Al
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 01:30 PM
even if you didn't know anything about the pan-African infleunces P. Simon was mining and the musicians he was employing at the time, there's something identifiably unique about that song within the pop landscape, and it's clearly in the arrangement/instrumentation realm rather than the 'songwriting' realm.

While the bass and the pennywhistle stand out, imho the ebullient horn section and rhythm guitar that really bring the song out of the novelty territory implied by the solos and the video and into the realm of hte truly unique.

*shrug*
2532631, Yeah!
Posted by Dr Claw, Thu Mar-31-11 02:19 PM
>even if you didn't know anything about the pan-African
>infleunces P. Simon was mining and the musicians he was
>employing at the time, there's something identifiably unique
>about that song within the pop landscape, and it's clearly in
>the arrangement/instrumentation realm rather than the
>'songwriting' realm.
>
>While the bass and the pennywhistle stand out, imho the
>ebullient horn section and rhythm guitar that really bring the
>song out of the novelty territory implied by the solos and the
>video and into the realm of hte truly unique.
>
>*shrug*

and LOL.
The thing that I remember most about that song... was the video.
Chevy Chase.
2532652, successful, but in retrovision... awful.
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 02:46 PM
the video, that is.
2532673, it served its purpose though.
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Thu Mar-31-11 03:08 PM
2532699, Masking the Africanisms? :/
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 03:45 PM
2532702, that too. :(
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Thu Mar-31-11 03:50 PM
2532994, lol...i don't know why but that cracked me up
Posted by dafriquan, Fri Apr-01-11 09:37 AM
something about african masks... like an unintentional play on words
2532923, hmm
Posted by peebo, Fri Apr-01-11 01:08 AM
i'm not sure i think there was a precedent in the singles from remain in light, at least for the african influence at the time.
2532587, DMX - Get At Me Dog
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Thu Mar-31-11 01:37 PM
2532590, The Beatles & Ray Charles
Posted by Harlepolis, Thu Mar-31-11 01:40 PM
"Strawberry Fields Forever" - Yeah I know this was from their Pet Sounds obsession days, but correct me if I'm wrong, wasn't that song the first by a mainstream band that used a mellotron?

"What I'd Say?" - I think he was the first, white or black, mainstream artist who used the electric piano. Again, correct me If I'm wrong.
2532592, 'Family Affair', Sly & the Fam.
Posted by SoWhat, Thu Mar-31-11 01:42 PM
apparently it was the 1st Pop hit w/prominent use of a drum machine.
2532605, 'Pump Up the Volume', MARRS
Posted by SoWhat, Thu Mar-31-11 01:51 PM
well, sorta.

i remember that 1 lept out of my radio speakers back then. Coldcut's remix of 'Paid In Full' came out around the same time, but according to Wikipedia this 1 was 1st.
2532629, LOL
Posted by Dr Claw, Thu Mar-31-11 02:16 PM
>i remember that 1 lept out of my radio speakers back then.
>Coldcut's remix of 'Paid In Full' came out around the same
>time, but according to Wikipedia this 1 was 1st.

PUMP UP THE VOLUME
PUMP UP THE VOLUME

I just had the flashback when you said "leapt out of the radio speakers"... I faintly remember Nickelodeon having some music video show and they would play that one a lot
2532672, Agreed
Posted by Jakob Hellberg, Thu Mar-31-11 03:08 PM
Also "19" by Paul Hardcastle and that annoying song by Yello.

Basically, electronic dance-music songs that lacked conventional verses and choruses. There was a time that felt like really new and unusual.

BTW, I always preferd Bomb the Bass "Beat dis" to both "Pump up the volume" and the Coldcut "Paid in full"...
2532609, Run DMC - It's Like That/Sucker MCs
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Thu Mar-31-11 01:54 PM
2532623, Tiny Tim - Tiptoe Through the Tulips
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 02:11 PM
no matter the year, anytime a ukelele-toting, falsetto-crooning hippy hits the charts with a cover of a 1926 showtune, it's going to be atypical.

Unlike a lot of the others being mentioned, he was not a harbinger of things to come, but a straightup anomaly. If you've ever sat through his Green Room performances from Monterey Pop, they're pretty painful. Hell, even the hit version is pretty painful: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=90JCY0Eh1s4&feature=related
2532662, "Through the Wire" was certainly the opposite of "Candy Shop"
Posted by Tiger Woods, Thu Mar-31-11 03:00 PM
2532688, Yeah but soul samples were everywhere in the wake of BP1
Posted by The Analyst, Thu Mar-31-11 03:34 PM
So were beats by Kanye West and Just Blaze.

Through the Wire was a bit unique in its approach content-wise, but the "chipmunk soul" sound that was popularized by The Bluerpint an Dipset was already in full effect by the time Kanye got around to releasing College Dropout.
2532670, Drake's "Successful" didn't really sound like anything out
Posted by micMajestic, Thu Mar-31-11 03:07 PM
It might not be quite as left field as some of the other songs being mentioned but I find it baffling that it got significant club play.
2532722, Yup, even "Best I ever had at the time" was different
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Thu Mar-31-11 04:09 PM
2532671, "One in a Million"
Posted by come on people, Thu Mar-31-11 03:08 PM
Yea, there were hints of that sound on the *album cuts* of The Show, The Afterparty, The Hotel. Really vague hints. But that song sounded like NOTHING on the radio in 1996. Yea, it was kind of rooted in the singing of R&B songs over hip-hop beats, but at the same time the syncopated beat and sparse soundscape were a complete and utter departure for R&B and pop radio. We kind of forget it now because EVERYTHING on the radio sounded like that 2 years later.
2532740, Yea, and with that, maybe Notorious Thugs as well
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Thu Mar-31-11 04:38 PM
First fwe songs with that triple cadence bounce before EVERY album had that sound
2532677, Blue Cheer-Summertime Blues
Posted by Jakob Hellberg, Thu Mar-31-11 03:11 PM
Such a totally rocking and brutal song being a hit during the hippie-era. You could argue that it's similar to Hendrix but while he (and Cream) was the obvious influences, I find Blue Cheer quite different in that the psychedelic flower-power vibe is *totally* missing...
2532703, That was 1968, right?
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 03:53 PM
something of a darker year for many of the flower power bands, even the bigger ones.

I mean, compare 'After Bathing At Baxter's' to 'Surrealistic Pillow.'

As for Summertime Blues, I still find a sense of fun in the verse/chorusm, but when they go off the road map - I agree that it wasn't much like anything else around.

The Who was already bashing Summertime Blues out pre-1968, but it'd be interesting to compare their versions pre- and post-BC's.
2532694, RE: Edwyn Collins 'A Girl Like You' (1994)
Posted by Austin, Thu Mar-31-11 03:40 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LB3OlxNkt9E

~Austin
2532829, oh, man... if I had heard this, I wouldn't have guessed '94
Posted by Dr Claw, Thu Mar-31-11 07:57 PM
2533045, RE: Case in point.
Posted by Austin, Fri Apr-01-11 11:12 AM
~Austin
2536020, I remember this!
Posted by MME, Fri Apr-08-11 04:52 PM
>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LB3OlxNkt9E
>
>~Austin
2532714, I'm gonna make an argument for Shania Twain
Posted by lonesome_d, Thu Mar-31-11 04:04 PM
though I don';t know her songs well enough to pick one.

It's not that her stuff was unique, but it was unique in that it *crossed over into the pop market* in a way that no other country star had done in at least 15, maybe 20 years... no matter how big Garth got, his popularity remained firmly stuck in the country market. Shania and her abs busted right on out and into EVERYONE's living room (and dentist's office).

If I think of 1999-2000, the pop music that springs to mind:
Britney
pre-Xtina
Kid Rock
Eminem
NKO... I mean, Backstreet & n*Sync
Rickie Martin
J. Lo
Mambo # whatever (which ain't a mambo but could still be considered as a separate entry for purposes of this post)
maybe Janet

The last time I can recall that a country song/artist had gone mainstream was Islands In the Stream (1983), and Elvira (giddyup bawoombop bawoombop, #5 pop hit in 1981).
2532725, At the time? I'd even say "Grindin" in 2002
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Thu Mar-31-11 04:10 PM
All drums, no melody at all? No "real" hook besides him saying "Grindin?" That shit was left field as hell
2532729, Nas - Made you look
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Thu Mar-31-11 04:16 PM
There were a FEW Boom Bap hits in the last ten years, but most of them were really just drums with modernized synths and instruments on it. This shit sounded straight from the 90's, at a time where even the East Coasters were on the South's dick (or Scott Storch, Neptunes, etc etc)
2532791, definitely.
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Thu Mar-31-11 06:08 PM
that shit was raw as FUCK.

and they played it on the radio! amazing.
2532731, Eminem - My name is
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Thu Mar-31-11 04:22 PM
2532787, RE: Eminem - My name is
Posted by LucidDreamer85, Thu Mar-31-11 06:01 PM
Busta Rhymes - Put your hands where my eyes can see.
I as younger at the time...maybe 6th grade or so..but I remember being like " WTF is this ?!! this is awesome !!! "

Think I saw it on the Box for the first time..

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xg_f2r8gAzU
2532804, Snoop "Sexual eruption/seduction"
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Thu Mar-31-11 06:46 PM
Even outside of Rap, it didn't sound ANYTHING like modern Pop. But for him to be that bold and to have it played on Rap/R&B stations??? Wild as hell.

I didn't really like it til I saw the video...then I liked it for a good two weeks LOL.
2532824, Cee-Lo - Crazy, Kast - Elevators, Rosa Parks, Hey Ya,
Posted by DonWonJusuton, Thu Mar-31-11 07:42 PM
B.O.B., So Fresh, So Clean, Roses, Ms. Jackson... you get the idea lol...
Kanye - All of the Lights, Runaway, Jesus Walks
Weezy - A Milli
White Stripes - Seven Nation Army, We're Going to be Friends
R.Kelly - Step in the Name of Love

2532837, Jay-Z - Death of Autotune.
Posted by SP1200, Thu Mar-31-11 08:14 PM
2532839, Eh...it sounded just like PSA though
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Thu Mar-31-11 08:20 PM
2532850, What does that have to do with this post homie? lol.
Posted by SP1200, Thu Mar-31-11 08:45 PM
DOA sounded like nothing out in 2009.
2532938, I guess it just didn't seem that left field to me, you hear PSA more than
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Fri Apr-01-11 03:40 AM
a lot of new songs at the club..maybe not radio though.
2533582, PSA is not even the same era as DOA
Posted by SP1200, Sat Apr-02-11 05:50 PM
DOA is 5 years later.
2532841, Queen- Bohemian Rhapsody
Posted by Lil Rabies, Thu Mar-31-11 08:25 PM
George Michael - Faith (rockabilly?)
2532857, Any post- Southernplayalistic Outkast hit.
Posted by Shade, Thu Mar-31-11 09:03 PM
.
2533302, what did playa's ball sound like compared to everything else out
Posted by mwasi kitoko, Fri Apr-01-11 07:54 PM
in 94?
i was actually going to post this song.
2533563, parcyde and some others were on that vibe
Posted by lexx3001, Sat Apr-02-11 05:09 PM
in 94? kast def fit in with the sound.
2533593, It was a breath of fresh air (for those who liked it)
Posted by k_orr, Sat Apr-02-11 06:24 PM
I remember HATING that song. In fact, I didn't like the OG until I played out the rmx. I didn't like Outkast until I heard claimin' true.

one
k. orr
2532867, Dee-lite "Groove is in the Heart"
Posted by Madvillain 626, Thu Mar-31-11 09:26 PM
2532902, tom cochrane - life is a highway
Posted by ajiav, Thu Mar-31-11 11:04 PM
From 1992, in between videos from pearl jam, en vogue, arrested development, red hot chili peppers, nirvana, tlc, etc., sounding like a car commercial right out the gate, old-person pop-rock at best. Recall hearing a country cover more recently in a store or restaurant and thinking it sounded more appropriate in that context, even two decades later. I have nothing against him, but out-of-place to me at the time.
2532983, for some reason I was thinking the version from Cars was Sheryl Crow
Posted by lonesome_d, Fri Apr-01-11 08:59 AM
>From 1992, in between videos from pearl jam, en vogue,
>arrested development, red hot chili peppers, nirvana, tlc,
>etc., sounding like a car commercial right out the gate,
>old-person pop-rock at best.

I couldn't have told you it was 1992... the song just sort of seeped into my consciousness over hte years, I guess. I would have guessed it was more like... 1986 or so.

>Recall hearing a country cover
>more recently in a store or restaurant and thinking it sounded
>more appropriate in that context, even two decades later. I
>have nothing against him, but out-of-place to me at the time.

but it turns out it's Rascal Flatts.
2533300, RE: for some reason I was thinking the version from Cars was Sheryl Crow
Posted by ajiav, Fri Apr-01-11 07:48 PM
haha perhaps confusing it w/ "everyday is a winding road"?
2532912, Nas - One Mic
Posted by selppataei, Fri Apr-01-11 12:25 AM
other rap songs on the 5/6/02 billboard hot 100 r&b/hip-hop:

oh boy
pass the courvoisier
what's luv?
i need a girl
down a** chick
lights, camera, action
awnaw
welcome to atlanta
say i yi yi
always on time
hot in herre
2532941, Damn, hell yea. Shit sounded waaaaaaaaaay diff
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Fri Apr-01-11 03:43 AM
2532922, Spread Love - Take 6
Posted by Wendell, Fri Apr-01-11 01:05 AM
Wasn't too many a cappella groups sing Gospel songs on the Pop charts back then (88).
2532925, how about right now: Adele's Rolling in the deep
Posted by Goose, Fri Apr-01-11 01:30 AM
live instrumentation, great singing. compare taht to the lady gagas, katy perrys and rihannnas out there now.
2532926, mambo #5
Posted by Madvillain 626, Fri Apr-01-11 01:34 AM
2532988, that was really mischaracterized more than anything else, imho
Posted by lonesome_d, Fri Apr-01-11 09:14 AM

and that mischaracterization of course contributed very much to its success; even though this was considered a part of the supposed Latin pop boom:
-Lou Vega wasn't Latin
-it samples the Perez Prado tune of the same name, it's clearly not a mambo or even Latin in feeling at all

It also, of course, sucks, but so did a lot of what was on the pop charts at that time.

Ironically perhaps, but the song that stands up best for me out of the supposed Latin Pop Boom is probably La Vida Loca, which is basically a fiery 3d wave ska tune. Parts of it are annoying, but it still makes me wanna do the old man skank.

2532928, Great post....
Posted by denny, Fri Apr-01-11 01:47 AM
I had a good laugh too. Here....I'll prove it to you.....hohoho.

I think you (or someone else) mentioned 'Smells like Teen Spirit'. If you look at what accompanied it in the top 10 of that time....it's undeniable.

What about Average White Band's 'Pick up the Pieces'? An instrumental funk song that hit #1? I suppose you could suggest that the disco era had paved the way for such a thing to happen....but I'll still say it's a lone wolf.

Here's one that always annoyed me....but how bout 'My Sharona' by the Knack? I think it came out around 78/79 or so. Power pop was not exactly the in thing at that time.

Someone else mentioned Queen and i think they got a few to their name. 'Crazy little thing called love' was an elvis throwback in a time that elvis was not cool.

The dreaded 'Macarena' needs a mention.



2532939, Doin da butt?
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Fri Apr-01-11 03:42 AM
I don't know...I wasn't there, and I know that the Go-Go sound had a few hits and inspired some, but I can't think of many hits from that time period that sounded like this
2532985, Norah Jones - First Album
Posted by Buddy_Gilapagos, Fri Apr-01-11 09:11 AM
Good Album but I don't think anyone would have guess it was going to be the smash hit it was.

**********
a licky boom boom down
2532987, Edie Brickell & New Bohemians - What I Am
Posted by soulive, Fri Apr-01-11 09:14 AM
2532990, hmmm
Posted by lonesome_d, Fri Apr-01-11 09:23 AM
yeah, that was probably the first inkling the charts got of the eclectic neo-hippie/jam-band vibe that REALLY got going in the mid-90s (though without much chart success, I think, at least in terms of singles).

Similar to Fast Car and later Closer to Fine, those songs really stood out amidst the butt-rock and the teen pop.
2533034, I was going to post "What's Up" by 4 Non Blondes
Posted by soulive, Fri Apr-01-11 10:52 AM
but methinks What I Am was bigger.
2533052, Cee-Lo - Fuck You. Amy Winehouse stuff.
Posted by Mgmt, Fri Apr-01-11 11:17 AM
2533315, Outkast - Bombs Over Baghdad
Posted by Admbmb, Fri Apr-01-11 10:10 PM
Shit still sounds futuristic. I'd also say that Hey Ya and Rosa Parks were way ahead of their time. Props to Outkast.
2533319, D4L - Laffy Taffy
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Fri Apr-01-11 10:20 PM
2533355, Eh...it came out after Dem Franchize Boyz songs tho right?
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Sat Apr-02-11 12:35 AM
Now if Scotty/Geeked up had become a single or hit, I'd DEF say that...as a club track, it still gets played more than ANYTHING else from 05.
2533483, i wasn't sure. i hated it more than Dem Francise Boyz tho.
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Sat Apr-02-11 12:46 PM
2534153, Yeah I hated it...but Franchize Boyz "White tee" killed tees 2 me
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Mon Apr-04-11 02:14 PM
I really stopped wearing them when that shit came out....and do you remember all the stupid ass remixes?? In my black/pink/half cut tee???
2533356, Thuggish Ruggish Bone
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Sat Apr-02-11 12:37 AM
That style was COMPLETELY foreign in 94 when I first heard it
2533380, Me'Shell Ndegeocello - "If That's Your Boyfriend He Wasn't Last Night"
Posted by SankofaII, Sat Apr-02-11 04:16 AM
1993 I believe....

I can't even remember any RnB singer who had anything that stood ouf that year...

Me'shell came out of nowhere...damn near bald, short, dark skinned, mannish looking woman rapping about stealing someone's man, playing THE FUCK out of bass black and white video with just different and HOT ass looking women talking about the men they stole, who left them, etc.

then we find out Madge-boops (aka faux brit madonna) signed her to Maverick right after Alanis (or were they at the same time and Me'shell came out later?), and Me'Shell comes out as bisexual...

some controversy THEN we find out her (Me'shell's) history in DC gogo, etc.

SHE was atypical in 1993 onward...
2533484, Yung Joc - It's Goin' Down
Posted by MISTA MONOTONE, Sat Apr-02-11 12:46 PM
how 'bout that one, R-Tistic?
2533534, LOL I think it still followed that Snap format, just added a dance
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Sat Apr-02-11 03:07 PM
And damn....have I played that song at all since 06? I don't think I have!
2533503, Amy Winehouse-Rehab
Posted by SC1221, Sat Apr-02-11 01:40 PM
2533533, Buster Poindexter - Hot, Hot, Hot
Posted by ErnestLee, Sat Apr-02-11 02:54 PM
Also, "Zoot Suit Riot" by Cherry Poppin Daddies, and "The Way" by Fastball.
2533590, Still Tippin
Posted by Stadium Status, Sat Apr-02-11 06:10 PM
One of my favorite types of songs are mixtape songs that blow an artist up i.e. this, Wanksta, Best I Ever Had.... The singles post-success never have that homebred integrity and are usually just throwaway and/or generic singles with landmark producers trying to capitalize off of mixtape success..
2534118, Lovers and Friends
Posted by Freshadenu, Mon Apr-04-11 01:27 PM
I think "we had to do it again" in the first 10 seconds already explains itself.
2535318, Club hit? D4L "Scotty" (Geeked up)
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Thu Apr-07-11 04:52 AM
This shit came outta nowhere...after that Laffy taffy shit that was mentioned earlier, this track here just had a completely different sound that still hasn't been imitated. Mafuckas took a damnn En Vogue melody and made it hood as hell on a boomin ass track that was basically them singing in that drunk rapper tone, but no Rap verses at all.
2535440, Every Kanye single since Flashing Lights.....
Posted by rorschach, Thu Apr-07-11 12:35 PM
Flashing Lights
Homecoming
Love Lockdown
Heartless
Amazing
Paranoid
Power
Monster
Runaway
All of the Lights

You have to admit....probably 80-90% of Kanye's singles sounded nothing like whatever was on black radio.


---------------------------------------


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2535442, Day and Night
Posted by rorschach, Thu Apr-07-11 12:38 PM
This one could be argued against other minimal hits........but not really. Not even Lollipop was that minimal.

---------------------------------------


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2535459, RE: Day and Night
Posted by Goose, Thu Apr-07-11 01:10 PM
if youre talking about the kid cudi song, that's straight 808s and heartbreaks inspired. emo ass lyrics, minimal production, sing-song delivery.
2535629, If that's the case, then ALL of 808's counts
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Thu Apr-07-11 10:04 PM
2535677, Nope. Day and Night came out before 808s
Posted by rorschach, Fri Apr-08-11 06:58 AM
Ye premiered Love Lockdown in August at the VMAs. Day and Night had been out for some months at that point. If anything, I should take back saying that the 808s singles sounded like nothing on the radio (it's still true technically) since they all came after Day and Night.

---------------------------------------


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2536043, Bubba Sparxxx-Ugly n/m
Posted by phemom, Fri Apr-08-11 06:07 PM
2539670, I just realized nobody mentioned Cher Chez La Ghost
Posted by -DJ R-Tistic-, Tue Apr-19-11 09:09 PM
2539968, RE: hits that were completely atypical of their era
Posted by teyegir, Wed Apr-20-11 02:44 PM
Like most topics on here this is relative, that said here are some nominations:

Salt-n-Pepa - "Push It"
The Fat Boys - "Wipeout"
As a 7 year old living in rural New York these songs were some of the first hip hop played on the radio there, it sounded so different from anything else being played at the time. These songs planted the seed for my love of hip hop.


Dr. Dre - "Nuthin But A G Thang"
This was the first time I heard Snoop, his flow and voice stood out. The way Dre re-recorded the Parliament samples used on The Chronic gave him a lot more flexibility in flipping those samples in new ways. This production method would go on to be widely used by many producers.


Wu-Tang - "Protect Ya Neck"
Just like Dre, RZA had a unique production style which proved influential and at the time sounded different from everyone else. The whole squad was grimey and gutter in comparison to everyone else on the radio: Native Tongues, LL, Kris Kross. Plus, after Wu came out how many assembled squads tried to get in the music industry using their template: put out a group album and then solos for everyone.