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Forum nameGeneral Discussion
Topic subjectPixar's Soul
Topic URLhttp://board.okayplayer.com/okp.php?az=show_topic&forum=4&topic_id=13354967
13354967, Pixar's Soul
Posted by bwood, Thu Nov-07-19 09:05 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4TojlZYqPUo

Next summer, Joe Gardner will discover his brilliant, passionate self. Watch the new trailer for Disney & Pixar’s Soul now.

About Soul:
Directed by two-time Academy Award®-winner Pete Docter, co-directed by Kemp Powers and produced by Academy Award®-nominee Dana Murray, Disney and Pixar’s “Soul” opens in theaters on June 19, 2020. According to Docter, the idea for the story is 23 years in the making. “It started with my son—he’s 23 now—but the instant he was born, he already had a personality,” says Docter. “Where did that come from? I thought your personality developed through your interaction with the world. And yet, it was pretty clear that we’re all born with a very unique, specific sense of who we are.”

“Soul” introduces Joe Gardner, a middle-school band teacher whose true passion is playing jazz. “I think Joe is having that crisis that all artists have,” says Powers. “He’s increasingly feeling like his lifelong dream of being a jazz musician is not going to pan out and he’s asking himself ‘Why am I here? What am I meant to be doing?’ Joe personifies those questions.”

In the film, just when Joe thinks his dream might be in reach, a single unexpected step sends him to a fantastical place where he’s is forced to think again about what it truly means to have soul. That’s where he meets and ultimately teams up with 22, a soul who doesn’t think life on Earth is all it’s cracked up to be. Jamie Foxx lends his voice to Joe, while Tina Fey voices 22. “The comedy comes naturally,” says Murray. “But the subtle emotion that reveals the truth to the characters is really something special.”
13354991, I am curious to see how this is received.
Posted by Buddy_Gilapagos, Thu Nov-07-19 10:57 AM
Looks good but it seems hard out there for big studios to make black films for wide release because of the political climate. I guess I am mainly thinking of Harriet which I have no doubt would have been well received 5 years ago but is getting beat up on social media mostly by people who haven't seen it and probably never planned to see it.

I could be wrong.


**********
"Everyone has a plan until you punch them in the face. Then they don't have a plan anymore." (c) Mike Tyson

"what's a leader if he isn't reluctant"
13355038, yeah
Posted by infin8, Thu Nov-07-19 01:59 PM
I'm skeptical off the rip.

Tread lightly, Walt.
13355150, if Coco is any indication
Posted by hardware, Thu Nov-07-19 08:59 PM
this will be fine
13355165, There's a lot of context around the Harriet backlash u're ignoring willfully
Posted by kevlar skully, Thu Nov-07-19 09:47 PM

Movies like Us, Get Out, Black Panther, BlackKKKlansman etc do really well

in general, black audiences have been over movies focused on chattel slavery, especially when the star hates black Americans and the movie has anything that can be considered a white savior. From what I've read about the film, they have seemingly gone out of their way to earn the opposite of a positive "Get Out" like buzz.

So I don't know why you're acting like 'it's hard for big studios to make black films for wide audiences' because one slave movie with a star that is anti-black American has poor social media buzz? The fuck do you expect: for black Americans to just eat up anything uncritically just because? That's insulting, but do you.


Harriet wouldn't have done any better 5 years ago, seriously. I don't know why any black person would cape for that movie besides generally being a contradictory smart dummy.
13355178, there it is
Posted by navajo joe, Fri Nov-08-19 08:58 AM
i was about to write pretty much the same thing but decided it wasn't worth the time. thanks for taking the bullet.
13355277, Bruh can you chill the fcuk out?
Posted by Buddy_Gilapagos, Fri Nov-08-19 12:49 PM
You guns blazing about two movies neither of which you have seen. You've decided that Cynthia Erivo hates black people based on some tweets. ADOS wasn't even a term a few years ago and there has never been a movement against casting a black person for a role because they weren't African-American (Where was the movement against Chiwetel Ejiofor for his role in Twelve Years A Slave?)

Whether Harriet has a white savior has been heavily disputed by people who have actually seen the film but a little over 5 years ago there was a Slave Movie which 100% had a White Savior written and directed by a person who has a well known and documented issues with race and yet do you remember any effort to boycott Django (I actually just googled #boycottDjango and it was white conservatives who were mad at the movie). You think Django would receive the same reception today?

Greenbook did a tried and true Oscar formula and that movie was roasted by black people (despite critical and box office success).

Hell Spike caught hell from black people for BlackKlansman for glorifying someone who was spying on the Black Panthers. When has Spike ever been given shit for not being Pro-Black enough?

Even if you don't include the issue of whitewash casting, you see there are sensitivies around racial issues in film you didn't see years ago.

Not saying all black movies get trashed. Black Panther and Get Out are good examples of how to avoid the pitfalls because the important thing to note about those movies is that they both have Black Directors and Writers.

Giving all that though, now you really want to double down and say for certainity that Soul, a film about a black Jazz Musician written and directed by a White Guy from the midwest, may run into issues like Greenbook and will be received by Get Out and Black Panther? Again, for a movie you haven't seen yet?

Having not seen the film, I at least had the sense to say I could be wrong and left room for doubt but if you are so certain...well let's just check back in a few months.

>
>Movies like Us, Get Out, Black Panther, BlackKKKlansman etc do
>really well
>
>in general, black audiences have been over movies focused on
>chattel slavery, especially when the star hates black
>Americans and the movie has anything that can be considered a
>white savior. From what I've read about the film, they have
>seemingly gone out of their way to earn the opposite of a
>positive "Get Out" like buzz.
>
>So I don't know why you're acting like 'it's hard for big
>studios to make black films for wide audiences' because one
>slave movie with a star that is anti-black American has poor
>social media buzz? The fuck do you expect: for black Americans
>to just eat up anything uncritically just because? That's
>insulting, but do you.
>
>
>Harriet wouldn't have done any better 5 years ago, seriously.
>I don't know why any black person would cape for that movie
>besides generally being a contradictory smart dummy.


**********
"Everyone has a plan until you punch them in the face. Then they don't have a plan anymore." (c) Mike Tyson

"what's a leader if he isn't reluctant"
13355373, So what that Green Book was rightfully roasted?
Posted by kevlar skully, Fri Nov-08-19 05:11 PM
nothing about Green Book was a "black movie" or for black audiences, btw.


Even actors like Sam Jackson were publicly upset that a non american stared in Get Out so the sentiment that it'd be great to cast an American to play an actual historical American hero isn't solely lead by ADOS. From Chiwetel in 12 Years to Oyelowo playing King; it's something people have noticed and of course the latest instance will be called out as a undesirable pattern.

Django wasn't an actual historical figure and was made specifically to be a action pulp movie. There's significant reasons why people respond to a Harriett Tubman movie was much more reverence.


I think if you make movies for black people to actually like; we'll generally like them.

Green Book wasn't made for black people, at all. It was made for white boomers to feel better about racism; of course it was roasted by most black folks; the shit was insulting tripe.

Girls Trip is tripe too but it's just for fun and was made specifically for black women to have stupid fun with and it was very successfully. Both Green Book and Girls Trip knew their audiences but only one movie thinks it's something it's not.

If black people aren't pumped about this particular Pixar movie, that doesn't mean making black movies is oh so much harder. It means that you should know your audience you claim to cater to.

There's a good chance I'll never watch Harriet or Soul and that's fine. It shouldn't be used as an excuse for any production company to not use black talent in front of and behind the camera.
13355081, Apparently 15 is doing voice work on this?
Posted by sectachrome86, Thu Nov-07-19 04:22 PM