Go back to previous topic
Forum namePass The Popcorn Archives
Topic subject10 greatest active novelists today
Topic URLhttp://board.okayplayer.com/okp.php?az=show_topic&forum=23&topic_id=54835
54835, 10 greatest active novelists today
Posted by UncleClimax, Mon Oct-10-05 11:17 PM
dont ask me to define "active"..lets say have to have published a novel since 2000...good? i ask because i really sleep hard on contemporary shit...knowledge me, por favor.
54836, my fav is sue monk kidd
Posted by 2nd2Nun, Mon Oct-10-05 11:38 PM
based on her current books and her old magazine articles
54837, Rowling >>>>sue monk kidd
Posted by Invisiblist, Tue Oct-11-05 03:24 PM
54838, they're different
Posted by 2nd2Nun, Wed Oct-12-05 07:38 AM
i like rowling too but how you can you compare?

edit: nevermind, i just noticed you posted this to everyone's response! i do like the potter books though, you excited for the movie?
54839, I'm re-reading The Corrections right now
Posted by johnny_domino, Mon Oct-10-05 11:43 PM
so I would definitely put Jonathan Franzen on the list

Also, David Mitchell, for Cloud Atlas alone.

And Edward P. Jones, for The Known World.

And Jeffrey Eugenides, for Middlesex.

And Haruki Murakami, for Sputnik Sweetheart and Norwegian Wood (dunno if those are post-2000, but they're the best I've read from him so far, and Kafka on the Shore, his latest, was kind of disappointing).

Zadie Smith for White Teeth.

Paul Beatty for The White Boy Shuffle and Tuff.

That's all I can really think of at the moment, but there's 7 at least.
54840, Have you read Franzen's essays?
Posted by celery77, Tue Oct-11-05 12:21 PM
I forget what it's called right now, but he has a collection published that I really liked. In particular the piece he wrote about The Corrections and the Oprah fallout, called "Mr. Difficult." It was a useful discussion of high-art vs. low-art, the relationship between reader and author, idea and art, etc. Whether you agree with him or not it's worth reading. Not every essay really interested me, but most of them were good and solid. If you like the Corrections, though, you should definitely read "Mr. Difficult."

I also got one of his earlier books, Second City, I think to read over the summer but now it's just sitting w/ a bunch of other books I got to read over the summer but never did.
54841, yeah, that collection was called How To Be Alone
Posted by johnny_domino, Tue Oct-11-05 12:47 PM
I like his other novels fairly well too, though The Corrections is head and shoulders above either of them. I like some of his short pieces, I think that Oprah piece was pretty good though I have a tough time remembering it specifically, but overall I much prefer his novels to his short non-fiction stuff.
54842, The Twenty-Seventh City
Posted by janey, Tue Oct-11-05 03:05 PM
I didn't love it.

I like him better as a social critic than as a novelist, although I did really like The Corrections.
54843, Strong Motion is better than the 27th City
Posted by johnny_domino, Tue Oct-11-05 03:43 PM
Though neither is nearly as good as The Corrections
54844, Harry Potter >>>The Corrections right now
Posted by Invisiblist, Tue Oct-11-05 03:24 PM
54845, if you've gotta be a douche
Posted by johnny_domino, Tue Oct-11-05 03:45 PM
can you just stick to GD? They seem to like that sort of thing there.
54846, a good friend of mine
Posted by janey, Tue Oct-11-05 04:15 PM
emailed me a link to England's favorite books of the century. Well, as you might imagine, "favorite" = "popular" and all the Harry Potter books were on it. Along with a few other choice pieces of crap. I told my friend I never wanted to speak to him again.
54847, have you read the potter books?
Posted by 2nd2Nun, Wed Oct-12-05 07:40 AM
before you trash them
54848, Yes, I read one, because they were recommended so highly by so many people
Posted by janey, Wed Oct-12-05 11:41 AM
Let's get this straight: They're *children's* books. I did not like the book, and when I gave it further thought, I realized that I really had very little in common with the people who had so strongly urged me to read them. Generally speaking, those who pushed them on me did not care for the books or films that I like. Makes sense, doesn't it?
54849, yeah, IMDB's greatest movies of all time list is like that too
Posted by johnny_domino, Wed Oct-12-05 01:04 PM
I like the Harry Potter books a lot, but the writing just isn't on the same level as real top novelists. I enjoy reading them, I wouldn't disrespect someone's intelligence for recommending them, but at the same time if someone really thinks she's one of the 10 best novelists working today, our tastes aren't likely to coincide.
54850, middlesex is fantastic
Posted by 49parallel, Wed Oct-12-05 09:13 AM
thanks for recommending it. eugenides reminds me a little of rushdie with his playful writing style.
54851, you're very welcome
Posted by johnny_domino, Wed Oct-12-05 11:53 AM
Yeah, I can definitely see the comparison, and I enjoy that attitude a lot more than magic realism, though that may just be me. Speaking of which, I need to read some more Rushdie. Just a word of warning, I dunno if you've read The Virgin Suicides or not, but Middlesex is much, much better, in my opinion. But hopefully it'll just be one of many great books to come.

Eugenides had a good short story in the New Yorker a week or two ago. I dunno if he has enough for a collection yet, but I'm definitely intrigued to check that out if it happens.
54852, good info
Posted by 49parallel, Wed Oct-12-05 05:01 PM
i'll scratch the virgin suicides off my list.
54853, I don't think the two are comparable
Posted by janey, Wed Oct-12-05 05:39 PM
and I really loved The Virgin Suicides.
54854, okay, i'll put it back on the list...
Posted by 49parallel, Tue Oct-18-05 09:17 AM
but put it at the very bottom.
54855, i loved The Virgin Suicides and Middlesex
Posted by jasonprague, Tue Jul-24-07 03:02 PM
but as i think janey said they're not even really comparable. two entirely different novels but it's definitely worth reading. now i just wish dude would release another book...


PEACE
54856, Clive Cussler
Posted by childprodigy, Tue Oct-11-05 05:43 AM
54857, Rowling >>>> Clive Cussler
Posted by Invisiblist, Tue Oct-11-05 03:25 PM
54858, Michel Houellebecq
Posted by Br, Tue Oct-11-05 06:41 AM
54859, Rowling >>>> Michel Houellebecq
Posted by Invisiblist, Tue Oct-11-05 03:25 PM
54860, I like your style.
Posted by Br, Thu Oct-13-05 06:35 AM
I can tell you must have read a lot of books.
54861, Toni Morrison, playa
Posted by kayru99, Tue Oct-11-05 07:01 AM
charles johnson
paul beatty
the dude who wrote soul mountain (asian cat, don't wanna disrespect by misspelling his name)
54862, Rowling >>>> Toni Morrison, playa
Posted by Invisiblist, Tue Oct-11-05 03:26 PM
54863, Rowling >>>> Toni Morrison, playa
Posted by kayru99, Tue Oct-11-05 07:16 PM
That sentence should be enoughto get you ass locked up for a few years in any civilized court of law.

In other words, you on that good crack
54864, Crichton
Posted by Samurai_Shampoo, Tue Oct-11-05 08:12 AM
54865, Rowling >>> My DICK >>> Crichton
Posted by Invisiblist, Tue Oct-11-05 03:27 PM
54866, richard price.
Posted by praverbs, Tue Oct-11-05 08:34 AM

ę trifling ass nigga Ľ
54867, yes- Samaritan best one so far, though Clockers is real good too
Posted by johnny_domino, Tue Oct-11-05 09:24 AM
54868, Rowling >>> Who?
Posted by Invisiblist, Tue Oct-11-05 03:27 PM
54869, Walter Moseley
Posted by WarriorPoet415, Tue Oct-11-05 08:52 AM

************************************************

<<<<<<<<Don't Drool On The Avy>>>>>>>>

"There's a fine line between persistence and foolishness..."
-unknown

"To Each His Reach"
-George Clinton

**************** OKP Free Agent****************
54870, and yes
Posted by johnny_domino, Tue Oct-11-05 09:24 AM
Dunno just which one is best, they're all pretty good so far, though I like the Easy Rawlins ones better than the Fearless Jones ones. Walkin' The Dog is pretty good too.
54871, Rowling >>> Walter Moseley
Posted by Invisiblist, Tue Oct-11-05 03:28 PM
54872, ^^^^^He's Crazy Folks!!!^^^^^^
Posted by WarriorPoet415, Tue Oct-11-05 04:17 PM

************************************************

<<<<<<<<Don't Drool On The Avy>>>>>>>>

"There's a fine line between persistence and foolishness..."
-unknown

"To Each His Reach"
-George Clinton

**************** OKP Free Agent****************
54873, lol.
Posted by dunk, Tue Jul-24-07 03:02 PM
but yeah, Walter Mosley is in my top as well. I've read all his books and he never fails to amaze me. His output of so many novels is amazing as well.
54874, i never read modern books
Posted by The Damaja, Tue Oct-11-05 08:54 AM
except for a few children's books, i don't think i've read any novels published during my lifetime

oh... except some tom clancys and a ken follet, The Third Twin or something. maybe a couple of other random thriller's i've forgotten. Some of the latter Dune novels I suppose

there's like 5 centuries of writing to catch up on first!

anyone else like this?

might read an Inspector Morse one of these days
54875, RE: i never read modern books
Posted by UncleClimax, Tue Oct-11-05 09:41 AM
like i said, im the same way...lol but i dont read childrens books. i have to say, now that i think about it, ive done a bit...i used to read some elmore leonard, some moseley...and i guess morrison's cool..but u know..i dunnno..i like don delillo *sp*...im talkin some real lyrical type cats on some real stylish prose thing...thats just the sort of thing im a fan of and cant imagine too many cats doing these days.

>except for a few children's books, i don't think i've read
>any novels published during my lifetime
>
u bullshittin.


>there's like 5 centuries of writing to catch up on first!
>
agreed. i got madd stuff i need to read..madame bovary and some other stuff i cant think of right now. but yeah im sure something like that is more urgently necessary to read than say the latest grisham novel...

54876, RE: i never read modern books
Posted by The Damaja, Tue Oct-11-05 12:02 PM
>like i said, im the same way...lol but i dont read childrens
>books. i have to say, now that i think about it, ive done a
>bit...i used to read some elmore leonard, some moseley...and i
>guess morrison's cool..but u know..i dunnno..i like don
>delillo *sp*...im talkin some real lyrical type cats on some
>real stylish prose thing...thats just the sort of thing im a
>fan of and cant imagine too many cats doing these days.
>

i'm about to read Libra. sounds good

see my problem is... i've got no idea WHAT cats are doing these days. if i read all the new stuff, i wouldn't have time to read the old stuff

>>except for a few children's books, i don't think i've read
>>any novels published during my lifetime
>>
>u bullshittin.
>

no seriously... a few more maybe. Batman Forever: The Book (lol)... maybe some that I did when I was at school though they also would tend to be old

>
>>there's like 5 centuries of writing to catch up on first!
>>
>agreed. i got madd stuff i need to read..madame bovary and
>some other stuff i cant think of right now. but yeah im sure
>something like that is more urgently necessary to read than
>say the latest grisham novel...

yep... it sort of boggles my mind that we even have these threads. i couldn't begin to put together a "top ten current novelists"... i'm surprised that from the thousands of new books to choose from, anyone's EVER read the same one as someone else
54877, Rowling >>>> you in Halo 2
Posted by Invisiblist, Tue Oct-11-05 03:29 PM
54878, your mum >>>>>>> j.k. rowling
Posted by The Damaja, Tue Oct-11-05 03:47 PM
54879, Kazuo Ishiguro
Posted by benny, Tue Oct-11-05 09:50 AM
Zadie Smith (haven't read her last cos I always wait for paperback)
prolly more that i can't think of right now
54880, Harry Potter-san >>>> Kazuo Ishiguro
Posted by Invisiblist, Tue Oct-11-05 03:29 PM
54881, William Kennedy
Posted by TurkeylegJenkins, Tue Oct-11-05 09:53 AM

_______________________________________________________________________________

"I now respect the Giants." -- OKP bshelly, 10/3/05

Hot to Trotsky: http://www.regeneratedheadpiece.com
54882, what do you think of Frederick Busch?
Posted by janey, Tue Oct-11-05 03:13 PM
I don't know whether he ranks as among the ten best novelists working today, but I do think he ranks as among the most underrated current novelists.
54883, I must admit I'm not familiar with his work
Posted by TurkeylegJenkins, Tue Oct-11-05 04:52 PM
I'm so wrapped up in my little nonfiction cocoon that I'm completely out of the loop when it comes to contemporary fiction.

_______________________________________________________________________________

"I now respect the Giants." -- OKP bshelly, 10/3/05

Hot to Trotsky: http://www.regeneratedheadpiece.com
54884, he writes some non-fiction, mostly about writing,
Posted by janey, Tue Oct-11-05 04:58 PM
but if you have any yen toward Vietnam war lit, his book Closing Arguments is among the best. You might not realize at first that it's a Vietnam war book.

Girls is also quite beautiful and relatively quick. And The Night Inspector is remarkable. Just to name a few.
54885, anything Tim O'Brien's written>>>>>>>Closing Arguments
Posted by johnny_domino, Tue Oct-11-05 05:00 PM
and that's not to say Closing Arguments isn't good, but still
54886, Not *anything*
Posted by janey, Tue Oct-11-05 05:02 PM
I thought Tomcat In Love was so-so at best. And I couldn't really get behind The Nuclear Age. That said, I have always made it clear that my two favorite Vietnam related books are The Things They Carried and Dispatches, so don't think I'm sleeping on the genre or O'Brien.
54887, gotcha
Posted by johnny_domino, Tue Oct-11-05 05:11 PM
yeah actually so far I've read The Things They Carried, In The Lake Of The Woods, and Going After Cacciato. I didn't like Cacciato quite as much as the other two, but I still liked it better than Closing Arguments.

For Busch, I've only read that and Girls, and I liked Girls much better.
54888, I think Closing Arguments is better than Girls, actually
Posted by janey, Tue Oct-11-05 05:15 PM
but that's just me.

Yeah, I don't really get Cacciato. Everyone but thee and me says it's his best, but that whole whaddayacallit reality thing doesn't work for me.
54889, Rowling >>> anyone with the last name Kennedy EVER
Posted by Invisiblist, Tue Oct-11-05 03:30 PM
54890, Whatever you say, partner
Posted by TurkeylegJenkins, Tue Oct-11-05 04:52 PM
The Pulitzer Prize Commitee respectfully disagrees.

_______________________________________________________________________________

"I now respect the Giants." -- OKP bshelly, 10/3/05

Hot to Trotsky: http://www.regeneratedheadpiece.com
54891, don't feed the animals, Mr. Jenkins
Posted by janey, Tue Oct-11-05 05:00 PM
lol
54892, RE: hmmm
Posted by Toothpick, Tue Oct-11-05 09:53 AM
my (highly subjective) list, in no order:

john irving
haruki murakami
don delillo
zadie smith
michael chabon
banana yoshimoto
neil gaiman
orson scott card
jeffrey eugenides
j.m. coetzee
54893, thanx
Posted by UncleClimax, Tue Oct-11-05 08:09 PM
i'll look into those cats.

could u recommend a novel or two from each por favor?
54894, RE: no prob
Posted by Toothpick, Wed Oct-12-05 12:53 PM
john irving - my gf is more versed in irving than I am. she's read damn near everything and has yet to be disappointed. For me, A Prayer for Owen Meany and (don't let the movie phase you) A Cider House Rules.

haruki murakami - The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle....and..oh...Hard Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World

don delillo - White Noise, Underworld

zadie smith - she's only got three books out. White Teeth, The Autograph Man, and the just released On Beauty.

michael chabon - The Adventures of Kavalier and Klay, Wonderboys

banana yoshimoto - Kitchen...can't think of a second recommendation. Not that her other books aren't good, but you should read kitchen first to see if you like her style. If not, it's not even worth checking her others.

neil gaiman - American Gods. His new one is Anansi Boys.

orson scott card - Ender's Game (it was written more for teens/pre-teens, but it's a great book. And it's written in that style with good reason.) Speaker for the Dead.

jeffrey eugenides - Middlesex, Virgin Suicides

j.m. coetzee - Disgrace, Youth
54895, if you're gonna read Delillo you have to check out
Posted by jasonprague, Tue Jul-24-07 03:07 PM
MAO II


probably my favorite of his. i dont know how true this is buti heard after the September 11 attacks the FBI went for advice on how terrorists' minds work or something like that...


PEACE
54896, Stephen King is and has always been my favorite
Posted by McDeezNuts, Tue Oct-11-05 10:34 AM
But I know he's too popular to be considered "great" nowadays.

I do think some of his books tend to be too long, and his endings are not always great, but I've never read a book of his that I didn't enjoy. And most of them I love, and have read multiple times.
54897, RE: he doesn't get enough respect
Posted by Toothpick, Tue Oct-11-05 10:37 AM
he's the definition of prolific. i can't read as fast as he writes.

peace.
54898, king isnt active anymore
Posted by Iltigo, Tue Oct-11-05 11:32 AM
i thought he was just finishing up his last series and putting it down for good.

and just writing articles for entertainment weekly


return to your home citizens

madagascar titties- (c) phontiggalo the rap jiggalo

I would never, ever hit a woman....but i'll beat a bitch (c) wifey
54899, Not sure I believe him. But regardless, he's published since 2000.
Posted by McDeezNuts, Tue Oct-11-05 12:41 PM
That was the poster's criteria for "active."

I knopw he says he's retiring, but a writer like him will continue to keep writing. He may not keep publishing, or he may only publish once every few years, he may get more into writing teleplays and screenplays (he seems to like it, though most would agree that he's far better at novels), or he may stick to writing articles like you said.

I hope he gives us more novels. I love them all.
54900, rushdie
Posted by Kungset, Tue Oct-11-05 10:35 AM
54901, RE: 10 greatest active novelists today
Posted by keithdawg, Tue Oct-11-05 10:47 AM
Tom Robbins (the most colorful writer alive, his plots are always quirky and amazingly imaginative)

John Irving (this guy consistently writes great, sincere and spiritual novels)

Tom Wolfe (Charlotte Simmons, though flawed, was still one hell of an epic in my opinion)

TC Boyle (He is the most underrated writer alive ... check out books like the Tortilla Curtain, Road to Wellville, or anything he's written, they're all wildly captivating, original and entertaining)

Toni Morrison (duh)

Kurt Vonnegut (though he hasn't released a novel since 2000, he still puts stuff out, and is the greatest living writer imo)

Chuck Palahniuk (great writer ... hard to top when it comes to dark humor)

Alice Munroe (If you dig tortured and authentic stories about love and pain, she's hard to top)

Mark Z Danielewski (House of Leaves is the best novel of the last two decades imo, and though it's the only thing he's put out, I'm sure whatever he's working on now will be incredible)

Ray Bradbury (This guy is too often slept on. Everything I've read of his is mind-blowing).
54902, RE: oh shit i forgot vonnegut!
Posted by Toothpick, Tue Oct-11-05 11:06 AM
peace.
54903, Vonnegut has a new book out
Posted by TurkeylegJenkins, Tue Oct-11-05 11:12 AM

_______________________________________________________________________________

"I now respect the Giants." -- OKP bshelly, 10/3/05

Hot to Trotsky: http://www.regeneratedheadpiece.com
54904, the stories he put out a couple of years ago were great
Posted by The Damaja, Tue Oct-11-05 12:05 PM
"One More for the Road" i think the collection was called
54905, Richard Powers
Posted by janey, Tue Oct-11-05 03:03 PM
Don DeLillo

David Mitchell. Cloud Atlas and Ghostwritten (and that short story in the McSweeney's thing) were incredible.

Based on one novel only, Helen DeWitt. Query whether she can follow it up with anything as good.

uhhhhhhm There was a time when I would have said Stewart O'Nan and I can still make a principled argument for including him, but his work is a little less consistent in quality than it used to be.

hmmmmm

Let me think some more on this.
54906, ghostwritten was great
Posted by roamr1, Thu Oct-13-05 04:45 PM
i didn't know he had a second one already.

what do you recommend from delillo? someone gave me a copy of underworld and i haven't gotten into it yet.
54907, oh babe, how I envy you!
Posted by janey, Thu Oct-13-05 05:09 PM
Reading Cloud Atlas for the first time was an unparalleled experience!

As to DeLillo, my favorite is Libra. And as much as I loved Underworld, I can't say for certain that it's the best one of his to start with. The Names, maybe. Libra is a good choice, though. Or White Noise.
54908, well alrighty then
Posted by roamr1, Fri Oct-14-05 04:26 PM
guess i gotta go cop cloud atlas.
54909, *especially* since you liked Ghostwritten.
Posted by janey, Fri Oct-14-05 05:16 PM
I wasn't so crazy for Number9Dream, although I thought it was fine. But Cloud Atlas, yeah. Perfection.

There are those who quibble with the form and say it's a gimmick. So that's why it's especially recommended for those who liked Ghostwritten. That form was gimmicky too, but it worked.
54910, Tom Robbins & Haruki Murakami
Posted by smutsboy, Tue Oct-11-05 03:06 PM
.
54911, let's see...
Posted by 49parallel, Tue Oct-11-05 04:43 PM
my list would have to include:

richard powers
don delillo
salman rushdie (tho his last one wasn't stellar)
marilynne robinson

maybe toni morrison too?

there was a time when i'd have put umberto eco's name on the list.
54912, Gilead was insanely wonderful
Posted by janey, Tue Oct-11-05 04:45 PM
and I'm lukewarm about Housekeeping.

And Eco, you know, Eco is only a half-hearted novelist. His best novels are really just expositions or illustrations of literary theory. His essays are great, though. Great!
54913, yeah, it's mostly on the strength of gilead
Posted by 49parallel, Tue Oct-11-05 06:09 PM
that i include robinson.

maybe by this standard i should also include edward p. jones.

and yes, i know eco's half-novelist, half-theorist. i've read lots of his theory. it just so happens that his first two novels are fantastic novels AND fantastic theory at the same time, while his last two ('specially island of the day before) aren't so hot at the "novel" end of things. agreed?
54914, Queen Loana is even worse
Posted by janey, Tue Oct-11-05 06:11 PM
and yeah, he'll never get better than the first two.

On nominating someone on the strength of one novel, why not? I did. Jones is definitely up there, too, and his short stories hold up to close scrutiny.
54915, queen loana is another robinson novel?
Posted by 49parallel, Wed Oct-12-05 09:14 AM
i didn't know she had another one.


"I maintain with clemency and munificence" -- J-Live
54916, scratch that question...
Posted by 49parallel, Wed Oct-12-05 09:17 AM
i just remembered that queen loana is eco's latest, which i haven't gotten around to reading. sounds like you're saying not to bother.

"I maintain with clemency and munificence" -- J-Live
54917, RE: 10 greatest active novelists today
Posted by Friscos Finest, Tue Oct-11-05 05:25 PM
Rowling>>>>>>>any active author
54918, most writers i read are long dead
Posted by DrNO, Wed Oct-12-05 12:30 AM
or non-fiction. I think I could safely put Chabon, Elmore Leonard and I suppose Edward P. Jones in such a list if I felt I was really able to.
54919, possibly in the next couple of years...
Posted by kevineras, Wed Oct-12-05 03:12 AM
jhumpa lahiri
dave eggers

i love them both, but we'll have to see where they go as novelists
54920, Dennis Cooper
Posted by kobe085, Wed Oct-12-05 09:17 AM
god jr. was really good
_____________________________
quantumb8
UW
54921, RE: 10 greatest active novelists today
Posted by KarlHungus, Wed Oct-12-05 03:00 PM
Lethem - Motherless Brooklyn is great and Fortress of Solitude was pretty alright too.

Martel - Life of Pi. Yan's only book that i've read... not sure if it qualifies as one the 10 greatest... but still a damn good read, tough to put down

Vonnegut - anything of course

Easton Ellis - haven't read the newest one... but all of his other stuff is great

not exactly "up on things"... could only come up with four, but i like 'em





54922, I thought Fortress of Solitude petered out pretty quick
Posted by janey, Wed Oct-12-05 05:43 PM
but yeah, Motherless Brooklyn is great.

And I liked Life of Pi a lot, but not nearly enough to put him in the top ten.

uhm, now I forget what else you said.

Oh, yeah, Ellis. I think he has flashes of absolute genius, and long stretches of genius-free work.
54923, agreed on Fortress of Solitude and Motherless Brooklyn
Posted by johnny_domino, Wed Oct-12-05 08:29 PM
I didn't like Life of Pi much though, right about the time "the Island" came up I seriously tuned out.
>And I liked Life of Pi a lot, but not nearly enough to put him
>in the top ten.
54924, Harper Lee
Posted by cantball, Wed Oct-12-05 05:45 PM

____________________
www.myspace.com/chamilton

Michael: George Michael, Iím sure that Egg is a very nice person. I just donít want you spending all your money...

George Michael: Ann.

Michael: ... getting her all glittered up for Easter, you know?
54925, funny
Posted by janey, Wed Oct-12-05 06:13 PM

~~~~~

Everyone down like brothers
Even white muthafuckas
-- Witchdoctor "Heaven Comin'"
54926, nick hornby.
Posted by WhiteNotion, Wed Oct-12-05 07:58 PM

http://www.audioscrobbler.com/user/whitenotion/
http://facebook.com/p.php?id=7810836&l=0ec8935346
http://www.myspace.com/flowtron
54927, I think many of us thought of him and then shook our heads
Posted by janey, Wed Oct-12-05 08:11 PM
How To Be Good and A Long Way Down are serious disappointments to those of us who thought that his first two were so wonderful.
54928, This is a hard question
Posted by blue23, Thu Oct-13-05 01:59 PM

B/c there are people with a great novel and then some average to pretty bad ones = Franzen, Denis Johnson, Colson Whitehead, Jeanette Winterson. There is Junot Diaz with his one great book. There are also people that I think have a good book in them like David Means. But the only two writers that I can say I think are consistently good are DeLillo and James Salter.

BTW
54929, Kurt Vonnegut
Posted by Friscos Finest, Fri Oct-14-05 04:49 AM
i think he's still writing
54930, Can't think of 10
Posted by crow, Fri Oct-14-05 04:41 PM
George R.R. Martin is incredible
Chuck Pahlunik(most likely spelt wrong)
Neil Gaiman
China Mieville- Incredible writer
Hunter S Thompson will always be my favorite
54931, Hemingway (lol) - last novel "Under Kilimanjaro" came out last month
Posted by The Damaja, Fri Oct-14-05 04:54 PM
although to be fair it was the same manuscript that True At First Light came from. just with nothing much cut, so twice as long. but True At First Light was only 1999

anyone read either?
54932, for those that like to geek out
Posted by roamr1, Fri Oct-14-05 07:19 PM
neil gaiman is great. he's got 3 novels (he's famous for the sandman graphic novels), haven't read the anasi boys (sp?) which is his latest, it's a spinoff off american gods and neverwhere...both of which i enjoyed a bunch.

i'd def start out with american gods.
54933, no one mentioned ha jin? for shame
Posted by kinetic20, Sat Oct-15-05 12:08 AM
so yeah

ha jin
toni
edwidge
anita shreve
julia alvarez
roddy doyle!!!
joyce carol oates
coetzee

two more...

um

i'll be back i think
54934, victor lavalle
Posted by jvictoria, Mon Oct-17-05 09:11 PM
slapboxing with jesus - great short stories
the ecstatic - wonderful novel

i would vouch for zadie smith, but i'm not sure what I think about her...i read white teeth but i don't remember it.

francine prose is also pretty prolific as is jonathan lethem. i like what i've read of their stuff, too.

54935, Tom Robbins
Posted by DonVito, Tue Oct-18-05 10:49 AM
I dont read leisurly as much as I should, but if you haven't read Still Life With Woodpecker or Fierce Invalids Home From Hot Climates, bump both of them to the top of your list for your own sake

i can't believe hes only been mentioned twice so far
54936, up
Posted by janey, Tue Jul-24-07 02:15 PM

~~~~~

It is painful in the extreme to live with questions rather than with answers, but that is the only honorable intellectual course. (c) Norman Mailer
54937, ..jesus?
Posted by shockzilla, Tue Jul-24-07 02:20 PM
that you, buddy?
54938, i guess mine would be...
Posted by jasonprague, Tue Jul-24-07 03:13 PM
Murakami, Edward P. Jones, Phillip Roth, Toni Morrsion, Eugenides, Rushdie, DeLillo, Coetzee


all i could think of for the time being


PEACE
54939, shalimar the clown was fucking great
Posted by shockzilla, Tue Jul-24-07 03:38 PM
*he said eloquently*
54940, got it on my shelf and will get to it soon man
Posted by jasonprague, Tue Jul-24-07 03:47 PM
heard wonderful things about it. good to hear you co-sign it...


PEACE
54941, i gave it away when i was staying in the hostel
Posted by shockzilla, Tue Jul-24-07 03:52 PM
and really regret doing so

it's good.

54942, RE: 10 greatest active novelists today
Posted by UncleClimax, Tue Jul-24-07 03:40 PM
cant believe this thread still exists
54943, Not one Martin Amis mention?
Posted by blue23, Tue Jul-24-07 04:29 PM
I mean I haven't read him in awhile but he's still putting out novels and his earlier work is classic = The Information, Money, London Fields.

DeLillo is in the same boat. New stuff = not so much. Older stuff = essential. Underworld (if you can take the weight) but Mao II, The Names, Libra and the overrated White Noise.

James Salter is my personal favorite but his best work is almost 40 years old now.

I have to give Franzen the benefit of the doubt but I'm not sold. While The Corrections is an A+, his other two are C's.

Michael Cunningham is also worth mentioning.

BTW
54944, his newest House of Meetings was pretty good
Posted by jasonprague, Wed Jul-25-07 02:59 AM
and i'm suprised nobody mentioned him as well as McEwan or McCarthy (as mentioned in the post below).


PEACE
54945, Cormac McCarthy
Posted by blue23, Tue Jul-24-07 04:31 PM
Is another the definitely belongs in this conversation.

And I'm not a fan but I'm surprised no one mentioned Ian McEwan.

BTW
54946, Eggers n/m
Posted by Morehouse, Wed Jul-25-07 08:54 AM