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Subject: "NFL Draft 2019" Previous topic | Next topic
will_5198
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"NFL Draft 2019"


  

          

Like I said, I'll try to get to everyone this year. But I probably won't.

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Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
First Round
Sep 27th 2018
1
DE Nick Bosa, Ohio State
Sep 27th 2018
8
ILB Devin White, LSU
Sep 27th 2018
9
S Deionte Thompson, Alabama
Sep 27th 2018
10
DE Clelin Ferrell, Clemson
Sep 27th 2018
11
WR D.K. Metcalf, Ole Miss
Sep 27th 2018
12
DT Christian Wilkins, Clemson
Sep 27th 2018
13
DT Ed Oliver, Houston
Oct 05th 2018
22
He may have cost himself some $$ tonight
Nov 16th 2018
47
      he should just pull a Bosa and leave Houston now
Nov 16th 2018
48
CB Greedy Williams, LSU
Oct 07th 2018
23
OLB Brian Burns, Florida State
Oct 07th 2018
24
DT Quinnen Williams, Alabama
Oct 15th 2018
30
QB Justin Herbert, Oregon
Oct 18th 2018
31
DT Jeffrey Simmons, Mississippi State
Oct 31st 2018
37
WR Kelvin Harmon, NC State
Nov 05th 2018
40
CB Bryce Hall, Virginia
Nov 14th 2018
43
WR Marquise Brown, Oklahoma
Nov 25th 2018
61
ILB Mack Wilson, Alabama
Dec 02nd 2018
69
OLB Jachai Polite, Florida
Dec 02nd 2018
70
OT Kaleb McGary, Washington
Dec 05th 2018
75
Second Round
Sep 27th 2018
2
OLB Trevon Hill, Virginia Tech
Sep 27th 2018
7
WR N'Keal Harry, Arizona State
Sep 30th 2018
16
DE Austin Bryant, Clemson
Oct 02nd 2018
17
QB Drew Lock, Missouri
Oct 09th 2018
26
DE Rashan Gary, Michigan
Oct 22nd 2018
32
DL Isaiah Buggs, Alabama
Oct 22nd 2018
33
DT Raekwon Davis, Alabama
Oct 28th 2018
35
QB Will Grier, West Virginia
Nov 16th 2018
46
QB Daniel Jones, Duke
Nov 17th 2018
50
QB Dwayne Haskins, Ohio State
Nov 25th 2018
59
DT Dexter Lawrence, Clemson
Nov 25th 2018
62
S Taylor Rapp, Washington
Dec 04th 2018
74
S Juan Thornhill, Virginia
Dec 06th 2018
78
CB Byron Murphy, Washington
Dec 09th 2018
81
Third Round
Sep 27th 2018
3
RB David Montgomery, Iowa State
Oct 03rd 2018
20
RB Damien Harris, Alabama
Oct 03rd 2018
21
WR A.J. Brown, Ole Miss
Oct 08th 2018
25
QB Tyree Jackson, Buffalo
Oct 28th 2018
34
DE Joe Jackson, Miami-FL
Nov 18th 2018
52
OLB Oshane Ximines, Old Dominion
Nov 18th 2018
53
DL Dre'Mont Jones, Ohio State
Nov 21st 2018
55
TE Drew Sample, Washington
Dec 05th 2018
76
WR K.J. Hill, Ohio State
Dec 05th 2018
77
OT Greg Little, Ole Miss
Dec 12th 2018
83
Mid-Rounds
Sep 27th 2018
4
QB Jarrett Stidham, Auburn
Sep 28th 2018
15
I might have been generous
Oct 13th 2018
29
CB Levonta Taylor, Florida State
Oct 02nd 2018
18
QB Easton Stick, North Dakota State
Nov 05th 2018
41
QB Ryan Finley, NC State
Nov 13th 2018
42
S Lukas Denis, Boston College
Nov 17th 2018
51
RB Parris Campbell, Ohio State
Nov 21st 2018
54
missed his calling as a cornerback/return specialist
Nov 21st 2018
56
watching Hill and McLaurin this year
Nov 21st 2018
58
      they figured out how to use campbell a little bit too late
Dec 07th 2018
80
LOOOOL
Nov 21st 2018
57
WR Collin Johnson, Texas
Nov 25th 2018
63
WR Terry McLaurin, Ohio State
Nov 25th 2018
64
huge improvement in his senior year
Dec 02nd 2018
71
      I'll be curious to see if Victor can make that leap in 2019*
Dec 02nd 2018
72
           I'm not holding my breath on Victor
Dec 03rd 2018
73
WR DaMarkus Lodge, Ole Miss
Dec 11th 2018
82
LB Germaine Pratt, NC State
Dec 13th 2018
84
Late Rounds
Sep 27th 2018
5
S Chauncey Gardner-Johnson, Florida
Sep 27th 2018
14
he had much better games against LSU and Georgia
Oct 28th 2018
36
WR Ahmmon Richards, Miami-FL
Oct 02nd 2018
19
RE: WR Ahmmon Richards, Miami-FL
Oct 10th 2018
27
      yeah.
Oct 10th 2018
28
WR David Sills, West Virginia
Nov 16th 2018
49
RB Myles Gaskin, Washington
Nov 25th 2018
60
WR Olamide Zaccheaus, Virginia
Dec 06th 2018
79
UDFA
Sep 27th 2018
6
Just hoping this draft is not as thin at OL and QB as this post suggests
Oct 31st 2018
38
I'm still diving into OL but there are guys I like
Oct 31st 2018
39
Kiper just put Duke QB Daniel Jones in his 1st round mock.
Nov 14th 2018
44
yeah, more to come on this
Nov 14th 2018
45
Seen 2 fully Kyler Murray games. Haven't seen 5 better QBs in my life.
Dec 01st 2018
65
he's fun.
Dec 01st 2018
66
Kiper/one of them said "wouldn't last past the 2nd round."
Dec 01st 2018
68
Great college FB player.
Dec 01st 2018
67

will_5198
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Thu Sep-27-18 11:14 PM

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1. "First Round"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

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will_5198
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Thu Sep-27-18 11:16 PM

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8. "DE Nick Bosa, Ohio State"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

There's not much to evaluate, because he does everything well. He checks all the boxes you want from an edge rusher: perfect size, uses his hands like a NFL veteran, rushes with a variety of moves, has the athleticism to bend the corner, and of course he plays the run. Obviously he's talented, but there's an uncommon maturity to his technique that you rarely see. Like his brother, as long as he stays healthy he's going to start for the next 10 years.

+ Incredible punch with his hands, extends and moves linemen where he wants them to be
+ Can flatten and turn the corner as well as anybody, even at 270 pounds
+ Half of his career sacks (8.5 of 17.5) have come against ranked opponents, so he shows up when it matters

- Doesn't have a superhuman jump off the snap, like a few of the freakiest blue-chip NFL rushers

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will_5198
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Thu Sep-27-18 11:16 PM

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9. "ILB Devin White, LSU"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Navarro Bowman kind of linebacker. A lead dog, an alpha, whatever you want to call it, he's that guy. His athletic profile is unreal (it also helps him cover up his mistakes quickly) and compliments his vicious tackling. When he hits someone they know it -- he drops bodies but with perfect wrap technique. Coverage? He can do that too, and uses those old running back skills to track throws in the air.

He could get a little faster between the earholes as far as processing, but it hasn't stopped him from being a damn monster to this point. I like him better than any linebacker that was drafted in 2018.

+ Insane burst and balance; he stops-starts with no loss of speed or power
+ Gets in the scrum and uses his thick base and explosive stride to run through blockers
+ Has range all over the field and can play three downs

- Takes false steps due to aggression and can be manipulated in the underneath passing game

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will_5198
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Thu Sep-27-18 11:17 PM

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10. "S Deionte Thompson, Alabama"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

This is what I'm talking about. I haven't seen a centerfielder with this much natural range since Earl. He is *that* good in single-high. Spiderman over the middle, all arms and legs, and closes on throws with so much pace even the quarterbacks can't believe he got there in time.

Lots of safeties are fast and twitchy, but what separates him is his anticipation. Even as an inexperienced guy -- he didn't start until the CFB Playoffs last year -- he reads routes like a fifth-year senior. That's an extra sense only the great ones have, and I think he could the next one.

+ Fluidity and acceleration in deep coverage that you cannot teach
+ High-level ball skills, a finisher who could lead the NFL in interceptions one day

- Underweight tackler who can be average if he keeps his form

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will_5198
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Thu Sep-27-18 11:18 PM

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11. "DE Clelin Ferrell, Clemson"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

I fell in love last year and nothing has changed. Elite get-off (better than Bosa's) with a mean streak to everything he does. You combine his first step with those long arms and all of a sudden you're an offensive tackle with two hammers in your chest and getting walked into your quarterback.

And when it's time for the real pass rushers to step up -- a coverage sack in a blow-out is not the same as a third down sack in a tight game -- he's relentless. When the game was on the line against Texas A&M this year, on the road, he was unblockable during the final drive. That's special.

+ Works his hands and should be the definition of what converting speed-to-power means
+ Move list is getting longer, and he sets up linemen with feints and counters over four quarters
+ Enjoys de-cleating blockers on running plays; seems as if he is punishing linemen for not letting him rush the passer

- Top-heavy and doesn't have the best bend around the corner, so he lets a few plays slip through his grasp

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will_5198
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12. "WR D.K. Metcalf, Ole Miss"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

This guy is the real WR1 prospect on his team, not A.J. Brown. He's built like Terrell Owens (6'4, 230) and eats up coverages downfield -- there's a couple of guys with his size in this class, but the difference is he can put his foot in the ground and run past you. Once the ball is in the air, he makes highlight catches that are as good as or better than any N'Keal Harry has made.

Only a redshirt sophomore so he's raw on a lot of things, namely his shorter route-running and how to attack off-coverage, but he does something NFL in every game. They don't make too many like this.

+ Deep threat with natural separation skills, and knows how to attack press coverage with multiple release moves and hand technique
+ Hands-catcher who wins balls through contact and can box out any back seven defender
+ Slashing, physical YAC threat with a burst in his long stride

- Learning full route tree and will get caught making too many moves instead of stemming and clearing the corner

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will_5198
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Thu Sep-27-18 11:19 PM

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13. "DT Christian Wilkins, Clemson"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

I was blind to him last year but he's the most consistent player on the Tigers front. People assume big Dexter Lawrence is soaking up all those blockers, but Wilkins is the one who actually gets doubled when Clemson rushes four. With good reason -- offenses have to respect his all-around game, and how quickly he can recognize your playbook in real-time.

Physically, he's the perfect size for a modern defensive tackle. He has the wingspan to extend and shed blockers (stands 6'4), but with a compact, squatty build (300 pounds) that makes him a leverage king and keeps him light on his feet. His hand usage is excellent -- better than Ed Oliver -- and he's effective lined up over nearly any gap.

You might sleep on him because he doesn't fill the stat sheet, but he's actually the guy who makes the play before play: the pressure that leads to an interception, the split of a double-team that flushes the quarterback into a teammate's arms, or the crumple of the guard in short yardage that the linebacker cleans ups behind him.

+ Smart as hell; diagnoses plays before they happen and ruins blocking schemes
+ Anchors against double teams better than his teammate Lawrence
+ Great tackler and is a weapon on zone blitzes as a drop defender (he has a safety's backpedal)

- Doesn't have the freaky burst of a 10-sack interior lineman

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will_5198
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Fri Oct-05-18 12:13 AM

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22. "DT Ed Oliver, Houston"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

I'm not seeing the Aaron Donald comparison -- Donald was already a more skilled rusher in college, and had counter moves to his counters. As far as undersized tackles go, Oliver (6'2, 290) is much closer to Geno Atkins. Both are fists of energy that have the strength to pummel linemen, but with the quickness to beat them without raising a hand.

Being "undersized" is actually an advantage now anyway. The NFL is a quick-passing league, and short guys who play with leverage and can beat you off the snap are way more harassing than a bigger, anchoring tackle.

I will say there are a few serious things he can improve, even with all the top-pick hype that's surrounded him since he was 18. Foremost, his attack plan when rushing the quarterback isn't very advanced. He gets away with it against Tulane and Memphis, but professionals will neutralize him if he doesn't learn more rush techniques.

Still an uncommon talent, however. And he plays a position where every team in the league wants a difference-maker.

+ Outlier physical build at a trim and sculpted 290 pounds
+ The power he generates on first contact is outrageous; grown men are tossed to the ground as if it was their first snap of playing football
+ Moves like a shark, with elite burst and pursuit effort that is unquestionable
+ Can sit against double teams and accustomed to playing through extra blockers

- Hand usage is not always violent, so he can get washed if he doesn't win with leverage off the snap
- Has a nice club-rip as a mainstay, but lacks a deep arsenal of rush moves once opponents adjust

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Warren Coolidge
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Fri Nov-16-18 12:51 AM

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47. "He may have cost himself some $$ tonight"
In response to Reply # 22


  

          

  

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will_5198
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48. "he should just pull a Bosa and leave Houston now"
In response to Reply # 47


  

          

Houston HC Major Applewhite stands for everything college football (he even quit NFL training camp after he was signed as a UDFA so he could start his coaching career) and seems peeved that Oliver is sitting out games. so he tried a power move over jackets or something. Applewhite's post-game comments were that "Houston is ready for him to come back when he wants to" and "we're all young and make mistakes."

Oliver already banged up his knee though, and has nothing left to prove against Tulsa and East Carolina. if the HC is going to agitate the situation, the best course would be to leave school entirely.

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will_5198
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23. "CB Greedy Williams, LSU"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

The main draw to him is his size and movement. We're talking about a lean, 6'1 corner who's as agile as a 5'10 guy. With that kind of height and length, you can put him up against an A.J. Green or Julio Jones and tell him to get after it -- he won't be overmatched physically.

Last year he was getting by on a lot of natural talent, but so far he's expanded his game and mostly washed out the bad habits. I thought he was awful in off-coverage last season; now he looks much more disciplined and hovers over the slot as needed. Same for his press technique, which has gone from over-aggressive to controlled intimidation. His biggest flaw -- losing the ball in the air -- remains a work in progress, but the improved technique has put him in less compromising positions downfield.

Overall, I like him. I always say to be good in the NFL you need to have rare abilities, and his physical traits fit that bill.

+ Enviable height and movement skills; a match-up answer to receivers big or small
+ Can be suffocating in press
+ When he is focused and completely on top of his game, he can erase your WR1

- Still grabby at times and will need to further adjust to NFL officiating
- Despite the high interception totals, he does not always track the ball and will negate his own perfect coverage with interference

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will_5198
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24. "OLB Brian Burns, Florida State"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Remember when everyone was enamored with Arden Key last year, before he took a summer-long sabbatical from football? Watch Burns and you'll see the same player Key was at LSU, just in a different uniform and minus the known baggage. Lanky, slippery and with a predatory closing burst.

Like Key, he's not the biggest guy (may have played under 220 pounds last season) and his frame is all arms and legs. He still lines up with his hand in the dirt most of the time, because his wingspan and flexibility is hell on offensive tackles. He's got depth to his pass rush as well, including a great inside counter and good-enough spin move.

I wasn't the biggest advocate for Key -- he looked too linear -- but he still had special qualities and would've gone first-round if not for his injury and off-field questions. Burns is an improved version of him.

+ Flattens and bends naturally to turn the corner
+ Hands as quick as a boxer; jabs and clubs his way past much larger linemen
+ Comfortable in shallow coverage and has awareness in his drops (avoids pick routes)

- Can overrun the pocket
- Not very effective in run defense

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will_5198
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Mon Oct-15-18 11:46 PM

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30. "DT Quinnen Williams, Alabama"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Holy hell, this kid is better than Ed Oliver. You want to talk about devastation? Watch his swim move. It's art in motion, and unstoppable. He can ruin a play as well as anybody in the country.

And not just as a pass rusher. You can't move him in the run game, either -- he's athletic enough to stone his blocker and still swerve around him for a tackle. Try to run to the edges and he'll probably get to the sideline before your back can find daylight.

Whether he declares this draft (redshirt sophomore) or the next, he'll be in discussion for the first interior lineman taken. Future game-wrecker at a premium position.

+ His swim-rip-club moves are sex
+ Natural-born quarterback killer who already has feints, counter moves and set-ups
+ First step is elite and flies off the line better than most edge rushers
+ Quick hands and uses them to smack around linemen with violence
+ Smooth movements with a closing burst and ability to get skinny through gaps

- Needs more experience against double teams, and offenses game-planning against him

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will_5198
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31. "QB Justin Herbert, Oregon"
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He's way ahead of the pack right now (position-wise). Haskins has a back-loaded schedule and could keep rising, but Herbert has shown everything he's needed to this season. Ideal size (6'5, 230), the arm is there, the accuracy is good-to-outstanding, and he's made plays in a disrupted pocket. He already has the Oregon offense dialed in, so another year in a college system isn't going to improve him much.

There's some ticky-tack stuff to note -- he's a bit indecisive when his pre-snap coverage read is wrong, and his long bucket throws down the sideline can be surprisingly awful -- but this is a franchise prospect otherwise. No need to be overthink it, or turn him into something he isn't (generational talent? he's good, but I don't get that feeling at all).

+ Spins a beautiful fastball and can attack all levels of the field
+ Throws really, really well off-schedule and from bad platforms (ie scrambling)
+ Repeatedly fits the ball into small coverage gaps with accuracy and anticipation
+ Keeps his eyes up when defenders collapse and not too prideful to check down
+ Dangerous mobility; if everyone turns their backs to him in man coverage he will hurt you

- Still getting experience reps, and you can see him thinking in the pocket when there's a trap coverage or the safeties rotate late
- Has a staid, quiet persona...different teams will interpret that differently, for good and bad

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will_5198
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37. "DT Jeffrey Simmons, Mississippi State"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

This d-line class is so ridiculous. Most years he'd be the first interior lineman off the board, but in this draft he's just part of the *second* group of defensive tackles (after Quinnen Williams and Ed Oliver).

Talent-wise, he's still top ten material. There's just a different sound when he pops someone's pads. It looks like he is hurting people every snap -- his hands are heavy, and he keeps coming until you get run over or are tossed aside. Seemingly the more blockers he can clobber on his way to the ball, the better.

Unfortunately for society he spreads his violence everywhere. He pummeled a woman as a high school senior (in front of a crowd) and Mississippi State suspended him a timeout or something as a freshman. Nothing reported since, and as long it stays that way nobody will care. This is a league where Tyreek Hill gets glowing adulation weekly.

+ Model physique for his position, a pure bull without any bad weight and scary athleticism
+ Can play any tackle technique from the three to nose, as well as five-tech, and at a high level
+ Ruins the running game and a stalemate is often the best you can hope for
+ Accustomed to beating two, and even three blockers

- Lacks a dominant get-off to be truly unblockable in pass game (his suddenness is very good though)
- Leverage is much improved but relapses still get him in trouble at times
- Might be rehabilitated, might be a humongous piece of shit still

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will_5198
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Mon Nov-05-18 12:34 AM

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40. "WR Kelvin Harmon, NC State"
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Here we go. In a quieter year for offensive players, I really like his game. He's got WR1 size (6'3, 213) with smooth movements, yet still retains that downfield explosiveness. This comparison is thrown around too much and usually without basis, but his lankiness and stealthy burst is a shadow of A.J. Green (he ain't that good, though).

Best part about him is how surprisingly tough he is. There are bigger receivers in this class -- a lot of them, actually -- but he goes up for the ball like the meanest kid in recess. He shrugs off contact through the catch-point, and once he has a clearing in the open field, he punishes defenders. I've seen cornerbacks actually bounce off and hurt themselves trying to kill-shot him in the air.

There's not a jaw-dropping awe when you watch him, but there's hardly any flaws to point out either. He can get open against any coverage, he's fast enough, he's tall enough, he's strong enough, and he's really good at making your quarterback's job easier. Sounds like a reliable lead option to me.

+ Innate ability to adjust to throws; reacts quickly while ball is in flight and gets in best position possible, even when off-target
+ Same high-level awareness on the sidelines, with NFL footwork (toe taps) and body control (corpse-falls)
+ Huge wingspan and snags passes like he has eagle talons
+ Line him up anywhere across the field; he can attack short-intermediate-deep levels
+ Long-striding YAC bully who is routinely underestimated

- As good as he is winning contested catches, there are a few games where he has odd drops
- Above-average at everything, but might lack that "takeover" trait that elite NFL receivers have

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will_5198
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43. "CB Bryce Hall, Virginia"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

This kid is a stud, and he's not being talked about enough. You want to see a cornerback play the ball in the air? And I mean correctly, not the Greedy Williams way (grabbing the front of someone's shoulder pads and ripping your other arm upwards). Watch Hall -- he breaks up passes better than any other corner I've seen this year.

He fits all coverage schemes, but good God is he nasty in catch-man. He'll sit back, read the route without making illegal contact, and smother it. Want to get down the sideline against him? Yeah, that's probably not happening. He will be in-phase the entire time, leaning the receiver into the boundary, then using his wingspan to armbar and disrupt any prayer thrown that way. Even without safety help, it takes a perfect pass to beat him. He just eats up outside deep routes.

He's a converted wide receiver so he should only get better, although he already plays with plenty of intuition. I'm a huge fan -- he has CB1 potential in the NFL.

+ Pro-ready size (6'1, 200) with long arms and a sturdy build
+ PBUs are artworks and most importantly, legal...he just finds the ball naturally
+ Patient and sure of himself in coverage; doesn't overreact and often runs the route for his opponent (good indicator of a film study nerd)

- Could be more sudden when changing of direction; his burst is solid but not elite
- Tackles like a former wide receiver (ducks his head a lot)

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will_5198
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61. "WR Marquise Brown, Oklahoma"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Yes sir. Receivers under 6-feet are now featured in offenses, not just regulated to part-time slot duty (and three-wide is base personnel now anyway). Especially if they are fast -- this kid has pure take-off speed that's rare even for the NFL.

There are other receivers who are fast in straight lines, but what makes him special is he is fast all the time. He's at top speed out of his breaks, which is just impossible to handle. He can split bracket coverage downfield and will get easy separation against off-man, like they're distance markers in his own personal track meet. Nothing scarier than a receiver who can take a drag route to the house (OK, let's redirect him at the line) and leave DeLorean burning skid marks down the sideline on a go route (OK, he slipped past press and the safety just shit his pants trying to stay over top of him).

I'm a big fan because he changes how defenses attack -- or don't attack -- your entire offense. His speed causes fear, and that leads to hesitancy, and a defense without aggression is the worst kind of all.

+ Since 2017 he has 13 catches of 50-plus yards (7 of those were 60-plus yards; 4 were 70-plus yards)
+ If he's not redirected, he's too quick for anybody to run with at the top of his route
+ Not just slotted open; he lines up outside half the time and shows ability to beat soft-press and stem his routes against off-coverage
+ Slips out of tackles after the catch and a nightmare to corral due to stop-start acceleration

- Flat out small for any position and will get knocked around a bit in certain facets of the game (he's 15 pounds lighter than Tyreek Hill)
- Shorter catch radius than most and won't win a bunch of contested throws
- Cousin to Antonio Brown, which will annoyingly come up in every broadcast

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will_5198
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69. "ILB Mack Wilson, Alabama"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Remember when Mack Wilson killed a man? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TOCDD8LgPeg

Absolutely one of the most violent kick-off collisions I've ever seen. Wasn't even called for targeting (although you know how that goes). Since that play as a freshman, he's sat behind a procession of NFL draft picks, then finally got his chance to start in last year's playoffs. But the delay was more about his program than his talent -- he's a perfect fit for modern defensive philosophies.

The best part about him is his coverage skills. He's a natural in zone or man, and tracks the ball as well as any linebacker in this class. The clincher is his reactions, though -- he has elite breaks on the ball and better hands than most tight ends. I've seen him cleanly scoop up throws that were inches from hitting the turf.

The other linebacker stuff he does well enough. Not a big intimidator between the tackles, although he forces the issue and slides off blocks OK. He might have a couple of ugly series when teams go heavy at him, but that flaw is less relevant these days...offenses are built around passing.

Special when the ball is in the air. Adequate when it's not.

+ Top-end coverage awareness and a dangerous player to throw around underneath
+ Screen-killer, which is extremely valuable
+ Has receiver's hands and finishes plays (6 interceptions in last two seasons)
+ Sideline-to-sideline closing speed and a madman on coverage teams

- Can be cut or get stuck on blocks a bit too easily; light in the run game overall
- Misses enough tackles for you to notice
- Always played with a wall of first-round d-linemen in front of him

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will_5198
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70. "OLB Jachai Polite, Florida"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Sushi-grade raw. Using my outsider jackass opinion, I'm guessing he's running on 90 percent talent. Which is scary (in multiple ways), since he rang up 11 sacks this season just being an unrefined, part-time player.

Can't teach a pass-rusher though; you can only find and refine them. And he's as fluid and natural around the edge as anybody I've seen this year. If we're talking pure bend, he turns the corner as well or better than Bosa, Ferrell or Burns. His first step is outstanding. His balance is elite. When he wants to, he can even strike an opposing lineman and knock him on his ass. All the tools.

A little risky because he hasn't shown the level three stuff yet -- it's a projection -- but talent-wise, he's special. In three years, it wouldn't surprise me either way if he has the most sacks in this class, or is still trying to develop a full-time role.

+ Innate, effortless ability to slip around the corner, flatten and explode
+ Super twitchy and blows past tackles untouched, like a receiver beating press coverage
+ Can run through or spin around you if he remembers to
+ If he gets coached up and starts applying more technique, he could be a 10-sack edge guy every season

- Hands are often late or forgotten about
- Counter game is lacking/non-existent
- Not always here for it against the run

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will_5198
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75. "OT Kaleb McGary, Washington"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

Although he's played in the shadow of teammate Trey Adams (preseason All-American in 2017 who has only started 8 games since then due to ACL and back injuries), I've thought McGary has been the better player for a while now.

He is a massively nimble man, with a huge frame (6'8, 324) but well-defined. I love him in the run game -- he dominates at the line and on the move. You see linebackers try to challenge him and just get engulfed into this moving black hole.

In the passing game he's more inconsistent, but promising. He's not good enough to guess wrong -- his ugliest snaps originate from bad starting technique -- but he shows the foundation of a solid pass protector. Feet are controlled, and he can mirror/punch a variety of rush points. If he cuts down on the self-inflicted mistakes, he's going to fairly reliable when you drop back.

Offensive line play is so down across the league, it seems like every prospect gets a round bump these days. But I like his traits, and even in his worst moments he'll come back the next snap and impress you. A nice potential upgrade at right tackle.

+ Effortless sealing the edge and pinning defenders; he's the guy that jump-starts a big outside zone run
+ Gets to smaller second-level defenders with target-and-destroy ability
+ Impressive moments in pass protection when his fundamentals are on point

- Tall guy who can get pulled off-balance in his pass sets, either overreaching against speed or getting fooled on a counter
- Lacks that elite kick-slide of the best offensive tackles

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will_5198
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2. "Second Round"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

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will_5198
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7. "OLB Trevon Hill, Virginia Tech"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

Man, what a first step. He is instant pressure off the edge, with a get-off that's as good as anybody playing for free right now. If you can be in the backfield before most linemen can even lift their hands, I'm interested. After I saw him use a perfect rip-and-dip to bend the corner, I got really interested. And when I watched him throw in a spin move, I was sold -- first rounder for sure.

But the more you watch him, the shine comes off him a bit. He can get very predictable as a rusher, overrunning the pocket and stalling when he can't beat the initial block. His balance ranges from fantastic to awful, as he's on the ground more than you want to see. He doesn't have a go-to inside counter either, so once linemen start adjusting to his speed he can disappear for long stretches.

That first step though. A precious enough a commodity to overlook a lot of sins.

+ Hands can be very good, and has a rip move that is first-class
+ Plays hard, and outruns backs and other linebackers in open field pursuit
+ Best football may be ahead of him; only 12 career sacks, but half of those have come in his last six games

- Kicked off the team this season after three games, which is a big flag considering his talent and how bad a shape the defense is in
- Tries to slide around too many blocks in the run game and will look like he fell into a sinkhole when he has to hold the edge
- NFL tackles will wall him off if he doesn't learn more techniques as a pass rusher

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will_5198
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16. "WR N'Keal Harry, Arizona State"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

I get a Michael Floyd feeling about him. In college he can muscle his way past defensive backs, has enough straight-line speed to be respected, and wins nearly all the jump-balls thrown his way.

I don't think he can be the lead option in a passing game, however. He has a real problem getting separation (also a Michael Floyd trait), and his main advantage -- his size -- is going to be less overwhelming against the NFL technicians at corner.

Spectacular ball skills, though. If he's your best receiver your offense is going to be limited, but as a complementary piece? I know I wouldn't want my defense to see him lined up in the slot, or across from an average number two corner.

+ Highlight reel on downfield catches; has strong hands and fantastic balance for a taller receiver
+ Big bodied and cut like a NFLer (6'4, 216)

- Lacks the snap of a true WR1 and isn't twitchy enough to shake corners out of his breaks
- Gets schemed open with a lot of screens and free releases; as a pure route-runner he's far from great
- Despite elite ball skills, he has several concentration drops and will let you down on the easiest throws

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will_5198
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17. "DE Austin Bryant, Clemson"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

When you look at Clemson's big four up front, he's the one that benefits the most. Which is not a total sleight -- those other three are just that good. But if you have to single block one of them, you take your chances with him.

That said, I still like what he can do. He's an 18-wheeler if he gets any kind of runway; I've seen him just annihilate right tackles who aren't sure how to handle his rush. He brings the same meanness when defending the run, and seems to enjoy blowing up pulling guards and stretch plays to his side. In fact, never send a tight end at him to seal the edge, because he will literally run through the poor guy.

Biggest weakness is his inability to break down in space, though. As violent as he is, he doesn't have natural change of direction skills and misses out on big plays because of it. That keeps him from being a better prospect, but he'll still add some nastiness and splash plays to your defense.

+ Hulk-sized (6'6, 280) with a wingspan that overwhelms linemen
+ Crashes and crumples anything that moves, which makes it really annoying to run outside zone or pull blockers to his side of the field
+ Likes to hit people

- Moves with a lot of inertia and has trouble re-directing
- Can get high in his stance and pushed off his spot if he guesses wrong
- Pass rushes with speed-power-extension, but doesn't have an array of counter moves or great bend to be elite

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will_5198
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26. "QB Drew Lock, Missouri"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

If you're not accurate in college, how are you supposed to be accurate in the NFL? Lock has attempted 1,300 passes over the last four years. He's completed 55% of them. That is alarming, especially with college rules that make a screen pass an offense's most effective play.

Those aren't just numbers -- his inconsistency aiming a football shows up when you watch him, too. A good percentage of his bad throws are due to laziness, fading away in the pocket or side-arming for no reason. That is fixable. What's scarier is when he is late on his timing -- he needs to see a receiver open before he can pull the trigger, which lets defenses catch up to his throws and force incompletions.

It's a shame, because he's a natural talent for the position otherwise. Perfect build (6'4, 225) and is never labored in his movements. Gorgeous, tight release when he's dialed in. Highlights and highlights of frozen ropes down the seams.

But if you're not accurate -- really accurate, into tight windows -- your NFL potential will always be capped. It's a trait that never seems to drastically improve with coaching or experience; you either have it or you don't.

+ Looks the part; a very good arm and impressive mobility
+ Adapted to three offensive systems in three years, so a quick-study who could have unseen potential with an advanced coaching staff
+ Attacks all levels of the field and can be clinical when everything is going his way

- Sloppy with the basics (release point, footwork) even after four years starting
- Doesn't face as much pressure as you think, and has some awful ideas when you give him too much time (scramble drills are prayer drills for his coaches)
- Racks up his counting stats when stakes are lowest; threw 44 touchdowns as a junior but 18 were against Missouri State (7), Idaho (6) and UConn (5)

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will_5198
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32. "DE Rashan Gary, Michigan"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

Anybody remember Bud Dupree's NFL Combine? It was one of the freakier workouts in recent years. He ran a 4.56. He had a 42" vertical (higher than Marcus Peters). He broad-jumped 11'6" (further than Julio Jones). And he did all this at 270 pounds!

Gary feels like Dupree. He's a 6'5, 283-pound sculpture with the movement skills of a 220-pounder. The first time I really started paying attention to him last year, I was slack-jawed at some of the plays he made. He could easily have similar testing numbers across the board.

Like Dupree though, the dominance is intermittent. Where is the game-to-game, snap-to-snap impact? When am I going to see more than one-and-a-half pass rushing moves? How come offenses rarely send extra help to block him?

In the NFL, you usually bet on special traits that can't be taught -- Gary has those, but as an overall football player he has a ways to go. Dupree is 25 years-old and still hasn't figured it out.

+ Insane pursuit speed and agility for a man his size
+ Sets a hard edge in the run game and annihilates tight ends
+ Can line up at any position in the front seven; creates favorable match-ups for himself and teammates

- Doesn't use his hands very well or have many pass rushing tools, so he can be neutralized for long stretches with basic pass-pro technique
- Not quick to diagnose plays as they happen
- Wingspan seems average and he takes long routes to the quarterback
- May not have a "best" position (the dreaded "tweener")

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will_5198
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33. "DL Isaiah Buggs, Alabama"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

He's a grunt, in a good way. He won't look impressive running through cones and shit during a workout, but when the pads are on, he knows how to play actual football.

Above all, I love his punch. He has mallets tied to the end of his arms -- when he smacks a guy in the chest, they get rocked back. It's such a simple thing, but violent hands are the difference between getting penetration and getting stuck on a block.

Although he plays at the end of the line and has a bunch of sacks this year, he's not really an outside rusher. He's an edge-setter, a ball-carrier vacuum, and the pressures he gets from his nice little club move or bull rushes are a bonus. What he lacks is NFL explosiveness -- his first-step, his burst, and his twitchiness are all average. That's OK though. There is a place for him in any d-line with the way he holds his ground and beats up on people.

+ Knockout power with his hands; punches and disengages blocks like a man
+ Has more nuance to his pass-rush than you think
+ A one-man fence when you try to beat him to the corner; eats blockers alive on edge plays

- Can be heavy-footed and sluggish in space
- At his best as a run-defender, which is a devalued skill in the NFL

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will_5198
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35. "DT Raekwon Davis, Alabama"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

He should be a guaranteed top five pick, but he isn't.

While most elite players see their talent as just a starting point, he actually puts more effort into playing below his potential. Why learn any hand technique or rush moves, when you can just try to out-athlete everyone? Helps that he's played with dominant linemates (i.e. better than him) who can pick up the slack when he's getting washed away by an undersized guard.

He *looks* like a great pro, and every few series he *plays* like one, so I'm sure he'll go in round one based off potential. But he seems like one of those teases who gets drafted as a difference-maker and never quite lives up to it.

+ Massive, athletic and long...all enviable traits that the NFL will see as premium clay
+ Hard to handle in the stunt game
+ When he plays through his hands, he has spurts of dominance

- Inconsistent at everything
- Hand usage is an afterthought; relies on his body to beat blocks
- Habitually gets tall instead of anchoring in run defense
- Not the thinking man's pass rusher; a large number of his rushes are him leaning on a lineman while he figures out what to do

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will_5198
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46. "QB Will Grier, West Virginia"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

Sure, why not. He's not anyone's blue-chip but he can get hot enough to carry a team for a while, which is something. One flaw he's really improved upon is playing less reckless -- "hero ball" has bookmarked his entire career and made him generally unreliable from game to game. Throwaways and check-downs are much more common this season.

At his best he lights up the pressure points on a defense, hitting the downfield cracks between the seams and sidelines. He makes a handful of those indefensible passes per game, and his bucket throws are better than Herbert or Lock. His anticipation is also better than before, as he's unafraid to throw into NFL-tight coverage (which is not always common in these college spread, RPO offenses...quarterbacks want and are accustomed to huge throwing windows).

We still aren't talking about a master of quarterbacking, however. Despite showing second-read ability at times, he still gets into prolonged ruts of lock-on fever -- he decides who he'll throw to pre-snap no matter what. That's where most of his issues and interceptions come from. He threw picks in 10-of-12 games last season (hurt the final three), and this year he's had a clean sheet in less than half his games (interceptions in 5-of-9 contests). That is not a pace for success in the NFL.

So yeah, an uneven prospect who will give you spurts of unstoppable offense, then follow it up with a "get him out of the league" performance. Maybe even from quarter to quarter. But at least he has the ability to be better than average…for a time.

+ Attacks every level of the field, and outstretches defenses when he's clicking deep
+ Good mobility to escape and drift in pocket while throwing off a bad base
+ Has a go-for-it attitude and takes what he wants, not what the defense gives him

- Still shoots from the hip and will chase big plays that keep the offense behind the sticks
- Can hold the ball too long and be generally careless on money downs (3rd or red-zone)
- Does a lot of underneath coverage reading based on his run-pass option, Iowa State played a double-robber against him this season and he looked like he was seeing 15 defenders on the field
- Less than ideal height (6'1)
- Fuck Will Grier

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will_5198
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50. "QB Daniel Jones, Duke"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

Ideally, he would stay another year and finish out his eligibility. His arm talent and mobility (he's run for over 1,300 yards in his career) are an interesting combo, but there are rough edges to his game that need full-on sandblasting.

If you squint a little bit, you can definitely see the outline of a franchise NFL quarterback. He shows the arm strength (all the time) and accuracy (some of the time) to make defenses wrong, while working with receivers who don't leave much margin for error. He's not just a thrower, either -- there is plenty examples of him reading the entire field, and going down his progressions or manipulating the defense to come back to his first option. That's exciting.

His lack of consistency is the reason he should stay. In 2017 his bad stretches lasted entire games; there weren't mediocre, they were abominations (ie barely completing 40 percent of his passes). This season it's more of a series to series thing, where he'll be late on his throws, or get cloudy field vision, or just pull a WTF move. Nobody plays perfect, but that kind of variance is not what organizations build their teams around.

His position class is wide-open this year, however, so who knows what will happen. I'd be modest with expectations if he declares -- the inconsistency is scary.

+ Good-sized (6'5, 220) and moves well within the pocket or scrambling out of it
+ Noticeable jolt to his passes; arm holds up when he takes a direct hit (no follow through) or gets his legs cut from under him
+ His coach is one of the best quarterback whisperers in football -- he has 4 Super Bowl wins on his students' resumes -- so his play-design knowledge and position detail is ahead of most
+ Long-strider and dangerous enough to earn respect in zone-read game

- Accuracy can be spotty; he will look fantastic for a quarter then start putting balls in different zip codes
- Can "over-process" his progressions, and flat out miss the best option the first time
- Roller coaster performer who plays the position that needs the most consistency

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will_5198
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59. "QB Dwayne Haskins, Ohio State"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

After the first half of the season, I really wanted to put him in the franchise category. He has near-faultless accuracy when targeting the stiches in a defense: those seams between safety and corner, or the little pockets of air between pattern-match coverage. He puts the ball on the numbers, in-stride, brushing past defenders' fingertips. The precision and timing in some of his games this season would make the most jaded quarterback critic shed a Knowshon Moreno tear.

That pocket presence though. He has trouble stemming the tide once pressure starts leaking through -- even when he does well to side-step or climb up in the pocket, he rushes his throws and his mechanics say goodbye. A few bad passes or sacks and then he's seeing ghosts for the rest of the game.

He needs a ton more game reps but the good news is, he might've played himself into a redshirt NFL year. I wouldn't fault him for leaving, either, since Urban Meyer's offense is only going to refine a pocket passer to a limited point. He's not worth risking a draft for, but his arm talent within 30 yards of the LOS is special. You're just praying his composure against a NFL pass rush will come with experience.

+ Hits timing throws and keyholes in coverage that even some NFL starters can't
+ Has enough velocity on the most difficult routes and as importantly, twirls a model spiral that is easy to catch
+ Only started one season and plenty of room to grow

- Despite capable arm strength, his deep passes often suck (under or overthrown by yards)
- Ability to handle pressure on a snap-to-snap basis is in question and the most variable part to his game (he could have easily had 6 interceptions against Purdue alone)
- Heavy-footed inside the pocket and doesn't move with a ton of flexibility
- Lack of experience manifests when he is slow to get through his reads

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will_5198
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62. "DT Dexter Lawrence, Clemson"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

Back in 2016, he and Ed Oliver were penciled in as future NFL draft picks one and two: both were 18-year-olds dominating grown men in the trenches with shocking ease. Lawrence has been somewhat forgotten about since then -- an injured foot sapped his burst last year, while his teammates were busy becoming the best trio of d-linemen in the nation.

In retrospect, he should have never been considered number one material because he can't affect the game like the best pass-rushing linemen. I go back and forth on his value as a defender -- he would definitely make any rotation better, but is he going to change a game for you?

As mentioned he was injured last season, but now that he's healthy, his teammates up front have had the same production with or without him. There are times he individually looks awesome: eating up a double-team, tackling a receiver crossing him on a zone blitz, or power-rushing with a swim move finish to scare the hell out of whoever is playing quarterback. And there are times he just relies on being big: not sitting against a double and getting rocked back a few yards, playing tall in a losing leverage fight, or pass rushing on a treadmill due to a lack of counters. So I think he's an asset, but you draft players in round one to either protect your quarterback or make splash plays.

"For every guy that’s 330, there’s 20 that are 290. There’s not an unlimited supply of those 330 pound guys, so if they have that kind of size and are athletic and have the skills then chances are they’re going to be playing for somebody. If they don't have the skills, then they pump gas." © Bill Belichick

+ He's 6'4, 340 and can really move
+ Strong tackler with a big radius, not always the case for linemen
+ His bull-rush is frightening when he gets his hands inside; nobody wants to block that
+ The rare nose tackle who can wreck outside zone

- Stands up all the time and has never mastered leverage in three years starting
- Get-off is really ordinary; he's a train downhill but you know where the tracks are laid
- Not always a vacuum against double teams, and you'd be surprised at how often he's the one left single-blocked
- A straight bull-rush is overwhelming for the 290-pound centers in college, but NFL interiors are going to adapt until he gets more weapons in his arsenal

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will_5198
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74. "S Taylor Rapp, Washington"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

I wasn't crazy about how Washington aligned him this year. I'm guessing DC Jimmy Lake wanted to showcase more of his coverage ability, so he put Rapp in a lot of single-high or split deep looks.

But that's not really his game. He's a box safety with range -- when he can play near the line of scrimmage he's elite, cutting off big plays before they begin and generally blowing shit up. He fears no lineman, locks onto ball-carriers like a tarantula, and will knock somebody into the benches before he gives up the sideline. Ten yards off the ball he plays nasty and fast.

Despite the extra practice this season, his limitations remain in deep coverage. He's not going to break on a ton of passes, since he's slow to diagnose route combinations and is antsy when backpedaling. Liability, no, but not a difference-maker if you leave him in the deep third.

Even with his averageness in coverage, overall I'm a fan. He's special when he's moving forward, and gives the defense a toughness up front that not a lot of safeties play with.

+ Great tackler who wraps up with a pop
+ Throws his body at pulling guards and cuts them down in the hole
+ Closes quickly and under control; he bails out the front seven and prides himself on being the stopper
+ Asian-American...the next generation's Dat Nguyen

- Unsure at times in coverage, lacks that sixth sense to get places before the ball does
- Assignment-sound but vulnerable to being picked on in coverage match-ups

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will_5198
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78. "S Juan Thornhill, Virginia"
In response to Reply # 2
Thu Dec-06-18 10:36 PM by will_5198

  

          

He surprised me quite a bit this season. I wasn't a huge fan of him as a cornerback, and didn't think his move to safety this year would lead to anything. Incorrect.

He's a much more confident defender now -- playing to his strengths and making a bigger impact on the back-end than he ever did on the outside. With his coverage background, he can man up the slot receiver and break on throws that not many other safeties are able to, and his tackling has been adequate. Apparently he was originally a safety, blocked by upperclassmen at the position, so the quick acclimation makes sense.

If you look at the success that Eddie Jackson is having in Chicago, that's a good model for him to follow. Both switched from cornerback to safety during college, and make up for their lack of size with a bunch of splash plays in coverage.

+ Superb pass defense skills, with finishing ability (12 interceptions in three years)
+ Calm feet and reads routes instead of just reacting to them
+ Great versatility
+ Does well weeding through bodies and finding the ball-carrier; solid-enough wrap tackler

- Even after adding muscle this past year, he has a lanky frame that won't carry a lot more good weight (can get overpowered)

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will_5198
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81. "CB Byron Murphy, Washington "
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

He's probably the springiest corner in this class. When it comes to chase-and-recover he's as good as anybody -- even in a bad position, he can almost always close the distance.

Smart, too. He plays a variety of coverages and knows how to leverage correctly for each of them, so you can line him up anywhere. Most corners in college will blindly drop to their assigned zone; he actually reads route combos and intersects them. And when he gets there? Phenomenal ball skills (17 passes defended this season). He's a fly-swatter with a fearless radius.

What gives me pause, however, is how much he relies on interference. Washington is a grabby bunch, and I wonder if the lax college rules hide the fact he is not the biggest defender. He'll have to match up with some intimidating dudes at the next level, and the NFL won't let him lasso them downfield like he's used to now.

He'll make or lose a lot of money at the Combine -- if he can't hit his listed height (5'11) and keep his burst with more weight (listed at 182, needs to be closer to 190) he's going to slide. I like him with caveats: he's a hawk when the ball is in the air and has unique body control, but is in for a major style adjustment and his size might expose him.

+ Already an advanced player for his age (redshirt sophomore who has only started 19 games) who sees plays before they develop
+ Ultra-competitive and treats every passing attempt like a personal affront
+ Gluey in man coverage and has the burst to erase his mistakes

- NFL wants 6'0 corners who can body up and block out daylight with their wingspans, he's not it
- For as twitchy as he is, grabs constantly to stay in-phase
- Based on how he adapts to NFL rules, he's in the Tre'Davius White-Jourdan Lewis spectrum (both very similar to him coming out of college)

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will_5198
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3. "Third Round"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

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will_5198
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20. "RB David Montgomery, Iowa State"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

I was a huge Derrius Guice fan and this guy is the Midwest version. Lives for contact, and has the best combination of power and balance you'll see in college football this season. Not just a brute force runner, either -- he can make you miss in a phone booth with his vicious, Achilles-shredding jump cut. His best runs are as beautifully violent as football can be.

So why not higher? He looks like a one-gear player to me. I don't see the explosiveness to beat angles and get chunk plays, which limits his potential as a lead back. And for all his craftiness creating space, he can dance too much and make more cuts than needed. Sometimes you have to get what you can.

Fun as hell to watch though and I'm rooting for him at the next level. If only he had a little more burst and long speed...

+ Literally makes something out of nothing, every drive
+ Low center of gravity with tremendous leg drive and lateral quickness = broken tackle machine
+ Team captain with natural leadership traits
+ Does well for himself in the passing game; very smooth hands and I think he'll be a reliable quarterback protector

- Play speed is average and he doesn't win the corner consistently
- Freelancing style will be reined in by NFL speed on defense

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will_5198
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21. "RB Damien Harris, Alabama"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

He's fine. There is a consistent boringness to watching him, as he does nothing spectacular and nothing awful. He runs plays the way they're designed, he can leg-drive through tackle attempts, has a little giddy-up to get into the secondary, and does enough on passing downs.

What he lacks is a special trait that NFL defenses have to account for. His feet are good but not great. He breaks tackles but won't make a lot of safeties miss. He's an outlet receiver that you don't have to worry about getting downfield on you. Also, Alabama backs always get a side-eye because they play behind the most consistent unit in college football...when's the last time Saban didn't have a dominating offensive line? Exactly.

He could be an above-average workhorse if he goes to a great fit. He's just not worth reaching too high for.

+ Doesn't dance around and always falls forward for hidden yardage
+ Squatty and balanced so hard to get a clean shot on him
+ Has an extra gear since he lost weight last season

- Needs an alleyway to be at his best and rarely has to create his own space
- Master of "good" who doesn't flash elite qualities

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will_5198
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25. "WR A.J. Brown, Ole Miss"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

For someone who was talked up as the best receiver in this class, I find his game to be pretty disappointing. He's a big slot receiver. With smooth movements. And catches most of the six-yard passes his way. That's it, that's the list of stuff he can do.

Where's the game-changing ability? Not down the seam or outside, because he doesn't have a getaway gear. So...he's an unstoppable chain-mover between the hashes? Not exactly. His breaks aren't sharp, and he gets little separation against top athletes. Well, he's got impeccable hands then, right? Nope. At least one questionable drop a game.

Nothing wrong with being a physical slot receiver. You just don't draft those guys in the first two rounds.

+ Can box out most defenders and muscles through tackles after the catch
+ Strong hands when concentrating
+ He should drop 20 pounds (listed at 230) and try to emulate Jarvis Landry; he has some similar traits

- 12 of his 17 career touchdowns have come against South Alabama, Tennessee-Martin, Louisiana Lafayette, Southern Illinois, Wofford, Louisiana Monroe and Vanderbilt
- 3 career touchdowns against SEC West opponents
- Never lines up outside and can be nullified when pressed; may not be much of an athlete
- Drops too many easy passes for someone without vertical ability

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will_5198
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34. "QB Tyree Jackson, Buffalo"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

Perfect project. He has exciting traits -- you just can't take him too high because you'd be pushing in a lot of chips on volatile potential. I guess all quarterbacks come with hazard labels, but there are enough red flags here to drop him out of the top 50 (for me).

First, the good. He has a real live arm, and several of his best throws are him flinging it without using his lower body at all. Him firing 50-yard darts onto guys' chests, while scrambling to his non-throwing side, is a talent that can erase perfect coverage. He looks like a NFL starter on passes between the hashes -- his fastball can get through zones and hits his teammates in stride. Plus he's huge (6'7, 250) and can move. Adds that read-option threat if you want to mess with teams.

Now for the stuff that gives you pause. He is heavy on first-read, which is a common college complaint. But he misses plenty of wide-open chunk plays when option one is not there. While big quarterbacks with his frame are coveted, he's at the height were a lot of his movements are elongated. Big wind-up. Unset feet that aren't in symphony with his throwing motion. A lack of smoothness in his drops. All of which mess with his accuracy (career 56% completion percentage). Lastly, he makes some miserable gambles when he doesn't need to. Red-zone interceptions. "Up for grabs" throws on first down. Decisions that lose games.

I've heard this comp and agree -- his skillset overlaps with Josh Allen (Wyoming) quite a bit. Big guys, big arms, bad mechanics, great throws, bad risks, inconsistent accuracy, group of five competition. Difference is, Allen was being hyped as a number one overall pick and eventually was taken as a savior. If Jackson slides into a more reasonable range, he could be a much safer bet for the future.

+ Can make fantastic throws without any platform, putting a ton of stress on defenses
+ Arm strength lets him be late on decisions and still beat coverages
+ Imposing size with soft feet to navigate pocket

- Loses passing rhythm too often and turns into a spray gun on downfield passes
- Has to see it open before he can throw it; even with his big arm he has plenty of contested passes on comebacks due to his late trigger
- First-read > scramble drill quarterback, which is not a reliable way to attack defenses

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will_5198
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52. "DE Joe Jackson, Miami-FL"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

I was more excited about him last year. He hasn't improved any since then, which is a concerning developmental timeline for a 22-year-old.

He's strictly a hand-down, 4-3 end -- when he's being disruptive, he runs the arc well and converts speed to power. Nothing jaw-dropping, just solid edge rusher stuff with a good dose of length. I was hoping the rest of his technique would be more advanced this season (hand use, leverage, attack plan), but he's still relying on the same two moves he had as a freshman. And opponents are adjusting: his production has plateaued since his 8.5 sacks as a part-timer in 2016 (he's yet to reach that number in a full season since).

Since he's not a super-athlete, I don't see how he's going to maintain his same impact at a higher difficulty level. I'm not going to close the book on him yet, but my enthusiasm for his potential has turned into a boredom for what he is.

+ Looks like a NFL pass-rusher at weigh-ins (6'5, 260 with a big wingspan)
+ When he wins first punch or outside rip, he's a handful coming around that corner
+ Fighter who gives high effort against run or pass

- Leverage is routinely bad, and gets him walked to a safe spot away from the quarterback
- Can flatten a bit, but otherwise as flexible as a board
- Hand technique is lacking and goes long stretches without any counters or different rush ideas

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will_5198
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53. "OLB Oshane Ximines, Old Dominion"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

Solid prospect. He's not going to satiate those looking for the next uber-rusher from outside the Power 5, because he lacks overwhelming size-speed-movement traits. He does use his hands well, and flashes some speed and counter ability, which makes me think he'd be better served standing up all the time.

I actually wish he'd speed rush more, because he gets attached to his inside moves and can get lost in a crowd. He's also a bit tight in the waist, and his movements have a segmented look to them -- the best rushers get off the line, make their move, then close on the quarterback in one fluid series of motions. Not as much with him.

So like I said, a defender worthy of attention but not a game-wrecking talent.

+ Productive year after year (12 sacks in 2018, 8.5 sacks in 2017, 7.5 sacks in 2016)
+ Has moments of twitch and burst; his tip-into-one-handed interception against Marshall this season was special
+ Attacks through his hands and uses variety to beat offensive tackles, not just speed

- Athletic testing will be huge for him; his wingspan does not look elite
- Plays with a hand down but due to his poor lower body strength, he won't last as a run-defending lineman

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will_5198
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55. "DL Dre'Mont Jones, Ohio State"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

Might have another tweener on our hands. In college he has dominant snaps against single-blocking, because his quickness is overwhelming for guards. In the NFL he'll have less of a pre-snap advantage, because those dudes inside will be bigger, stronger and fast enough to mirror his athleticism.

I do love his hands and move-set, though. He consistently flashes advanced rusher stuff, from push-pull, to a Michael Phelps-freestyle swim over, as well as a death-knell spin move that is scary quick and compact. Plus he can string all of those together in an unbroken flow.

Thing is, he's listed at 295 but I have a hard time believing he plays at that number. He looks at least 15 pounds less than that (not much of difference when he stands next to Bosa, who reports at 270). Now he does have a unique frame and carries his weight impressively, but he's supposed to be Gerald McCoy's size -- not a just big defensive end.

Even if he is that weight, his playstyle is a problem regardless. He has no anchor. He stands up at the snap and plays tall through the whistle. He is more offense than defense against the run -- I'm talking about a complete horror show when he has to hold any sort of gap. A double team by Youngstown State would put him on his ass; he gets carried 3-5 yards backwards whenever the guard and center both put hands on him. He can't even be on the field on short downs.

I know stopping the run is no longer a NFL priority these days, but you can't just be a free gap on defense every snap. A boom-bust defender who will make splash plays with his twitch and rush technique, or get totally washed.

+ Knows how to attack pass-blocking with a variety of moves
+ Has impressive wingspan and burst, packed in a ripped physique
+ Athletic enough to jump cut blocks and even intercept screen passes

- Leverage has not improved over his career and remains his biggest weakness (too often he is on the ground)
- There are inside linebackers who take on run-blocks better than him
- Could move to defensive end, or be a hybrid lineman, but is most disruptive in a phone booth and doesn't show ability to bend around the edge

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will_5198
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76. "TE Drew Sample, Washington"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

Bit of a sleeper in my opinion. A coach like Belichick or Frank Reich would probably love to have him, because he has no pronounced weaknesses and does two things extremely well: make contested catches and block his ass off.

Hands-down one of the most impressive blockers -- at any position -- I've watched this year. While he's not even that big (251 pounds), his inside latch and extension are just so good. He also sustains his blocks, which is a big difference from most guys who make that initial punch then slide off.

As a receiver he doesn't have a ton of experience with the advanced stuff, and he lacks the juice to really separate from coverage down the seam. But his catch radius is phenomenal, and he ripped down the typically off-target, improvised Jake Browning passes with ease. He's in the circle of trust on third downs.

Top 100 may be a little aggressive but I'm enamored with what he can bring to an offense. He's a true all-everything tight end: he can lead block from the backfield, seal a defensive end, or split out and wipe out a safety 10 yards away. That multiplicity lets him line up anywhere, making your formations dynamic and homogeneous at the same time. Future unsung hero for offensive coordinators.

+ Impressive move blocker who can handle himself in-line or out in space
+ Hard for defenders to get off his blocks, and he does it without illegal holding
+ Accuracy-adjuster who makes receptions through contact

- Not a run-away-from-you athlete and doesn't show great separation skills
- Long-strider who runs a lot of drag routes and underneath stuff
- Complimentary player who doesn't demand defensive attention on his own

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will_5198
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77. "WR K.J. Hill, Ohio State"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

One of my guys. He's average-sized and not a burner, but so damn crafty he just finds a way to shred underneath coverage.

Outside receivers getting bottled up? He'll get open for you, and runs in/out of his breaks without changing speed. Under pressure, and have to get off a quick, inaccurate pass? That's okay, he makes one-handed catches every game. Need a flash of offense or third-and-five conversion? He has fantastic body control and runs through contact to get that last yard.

If he's misused he'll be wasted snaps, and he can't break a 10-yarder into a 50-yarder, but he's a pure football player who knows how to attack defenses. Put him in the slot and watch him make play after play.

+ Quicker than straight-line fast, and his cuts can shake some of the best defenders
+ Adjusts to the ball with ease and secures catches no matter who's draped over him
+ "Game day" player who does better in bigger moments
+ Punt-return value

- Strictly a slot/motion receiver who won't be very successful lined up wide
- Not a crazy speed guy, so you lose some of that vertical presence other slot receivers have
- Separation can be lacking against elite athletes

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will_5198
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83. "OT Greg Little, Ole Miss"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

He's one that looks great at first glance, but as you watch more and more games the enthusiasm for him just dies off. I definitely wanted to be a fan -- there's not many guys built like him (6'6, 325), with the wingspan and movement skills of a man born to play NFL left tackle.

Sadly, the talent often doesn't match the result. He punches at defenders like a baby slapping water, and any rusher with decent hand usage is going to give him problems. The balance is not consistently there -- he's a leaner who slides off linemen when they make a second move -- and he has a tough time recovering from false steps. Oh, and for as quickly as he can pull and reach the second level, many times you'll see him just bumble past a linebacker and put his arm out like a crossing guard (to show he meant to block him).

His up-and-down play isn't the scariest part about him though. What's really frightening is that he's talented enough to be overdrafted regardless, if your team thinks they can coach him up. And maybe so; when it's all said and done people will wonder how Ole Miss went 4-11 in the SEC these last two years despite having 5-to-8 NFL players on offense.

The league needs tackles and there are plenty of bad ones still starting. But I think his poor skills outweigh his talented traits, making him too volatile to draft early.

+ Has the natural agility and size to wall off pass rushers; blindside starting potential
+ Smooth mover at his size and can glide to any spot on the field
+ When it all falls right for him, he dominates with ease

- Plays patty cake with his hands and is often uppercut in his chest as a response
- Doesn't have an edge to him; when he gets beat he concedes early and loses battles against far inferior defenders who play tougher
- His flaws remain the same year after year (not a good developmental sign)
- If it doesn't work out on an island, his style of play does not favor a move inside

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will_5198
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4. "Mid-Rounds"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

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will_5198
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15. "QB Jarrett Stidham, Auburn"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

I don't know why everyone keeps trying to make Jarrett Stidham happen. If he has a special trait worth waiting on, I've yet to see it in a game.

Physically he's got an average build with above-average mobility. He does spin a pretty ball, and it's very catchable…for both sides. Which is my main problem with him -- he doesn't show much natural quarterbacking ability. You know, like reading progressions (two is a struggle), or stepping up in the pocket to buy time for a deep throw. He's played in two systems (Baylor transfer) where the quarterback makes one read, and has the defense manipulated for him by the coaching and alignment. Left to his own devices he's a headless chicken.

What I do see is a young Blake Bortles, but smaller and with a worse arm. Exciting.

+ Pretty passer when he's unbothered
+ Moves well and adds a running option from the quarterback spot

- Prolongs plays in a bad way due to his non-existent pocket presence; a sack magnet that takes a bunch of unnecessary hits (9 fumbles in 2017)
- Accuracy comes and goes, even on the easiest passes
- Coverages process slowly for him and he gets into a panic mode when first read is not well defined
- Benefits greatly from every defense focusing on the multi-read Auburn running game; gets vanilla coverages and mush rushes on most throws

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will_5198
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29. "I might have been generous"
In response to Reply # 15


  

          

he looked undraftable against Mississippi State and Tennessee these past two weeks.

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will_5198
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18. "CB Levonta Taylor, Florida State"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

It's hard being a defensive back these days. Going over the middle is now considered a "no rough hitting zone" for opposing receivers, and pretty much every rule is designed to limit your effectiveness.

So it's *really* hard to be an undersized defensive back. That's what Taylor is, and you could almost look past his shortcoming if he had better awareness playing the ball. Every game I've seen of him, he goes into panic mode when receivers put their hands up, and resorts to blatant interference or doing blind 360s trying to find the football.

He does have his moments due to his pure athleticism -- he tested in a pretty freaky SPARQ percentile as a recruit -- but to have a chance in today's NFL, you've got to be damn good at disrupting receivers at the catch point. He's not.

+ Has a lot of good reps in press coverage
+ Naturally springy for the position and has make-up burst

- Listed at 5'10 but probably 5'9 at best, undersized either way and lacks length to contest throws
- Despite his good stretches, when he's beat it's ugly
- Footwork and route recognition can both be shaky, as if he's still learning the position fundamentally

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will_5198
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41. "QB Easton Stick, North Dakota State"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

He plays quarterback like the coach's son. You know he's been practicing five-step drops since elementary school, and probably had to throw his quota of footballs through swinging tires every night. Which is a good thing -- he runs the offense with autonomy, crisply executing play designs and even calling audibles (unlike so many sideline-coached, robo-QBs these days).

Sadly, his field vision is not as sharp. Yes he gets his team in the right play most of the time, and he'll start scrambling before he makes a careless throw, but he doesn't see tight openings in coverage as well as he should. When his pre-snap read is there he's golden...when he has to fit it in a crowded space (ie the NFL), he can be erratic. Again, this is happening against Illinois State and Delaware; NFL defensive speed will be like the first time you watched 720p at Best Buy.

He does have the physical minimums to play the position (his mobility is actually above-average, and enough to be game-planned against), so I think he'll catch on as a low-ceiling project. A guy who can make the safe throws and run the offense on schedule for a little while.

+ Good athlete who throws easily on the move
+ Has some head fakes and can look safeties off, while coming back to his second or third read
+ Runs pro-style concepts from under center and the gun
+ Multi-year starter, national champion, sophomore team captain…he marks the "resume" checkbox

- Makes solid throws but his arm doesn't seem to have much pop
- His timing isn't great on late-breaking routes, letting defenders close in, and since he is rarely pressured, his hot reads are not the greatest
- Can get stuck on first read and will double-clutch a lot
- Faced a low level of competition while lacking the spectacular traits that are projectable to the NFL

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will_5198
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42. "QB Ryan Finley, NC State"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

Back-up type with placeholder upside. There's not much juice in his arm, and he's not good enough at quarterbacking to pick apart elite defenses. The fact he has plenty of game experience (redshirt senior, Boise State transfer...he started college in 2013!) tells me his upside is pretty much tapped out.

Has his moments when he gets in a rhythm, but you can find a version of him in every draft.

+ "Classic" size for position (6'4, 210) and does good work in the quick passing game
+ Can slide around in the pocket and keeps his head up against pressure

- Has had sneakily excellent targets while at NC State; over the last two years, I'll estimate that five of his receivers and backs will make NFL rosters (two were drafted in 2018 already)
- Arm strength is borderline for the NFL and he doesn't threaten safeties over the top
- Robotic decisions at times, especially on play-action where he just forces the ball into a thicket of defenders (he just assumes the linebacker will bite and chucks it)
- Lanky body with disjointed movements; weird arm angles and awkward scrambles

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will_5198
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51. "S Lukas Denis, Boston College"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

He can do a lot of things you need out of a modern-day safety, so I want to like him. His tackling, however...sheesh. He gets flat-out smoked at least once a game, which is hard for me to reconcile.

Coverage-wise he draws your attention, with clean movements and the ability to mirror tight ends or slot receivers. Boston College even got a little brazen (a lot, rather) and had him shadow Kelvin Harmon this year. Harmon eventually went off but at least Denis had a few good reps (former HS corner), which is more than most safeties could say in that situation.

I wish I could put as good a spin on his tackling. I mean, he's been playing defense for a long time now and started a bunch of games in college -- he has the *ability* to be an average stopper, he just doesn't do it. Everybody misses tackles but his are the back-breaking, to-the-house variety.

If you focus on his ability to play over slot and single-high, along with his length to contest and close on passes, there is talent to work with here. I just can't give the full endorsement, because he's always one whiff on a slant or alley-fill from giving up a 70-yarder. By definition that is the opposite of a safety.

+ Lanky frame with smooth body control and a burst
+ Lines up all over the field and does a good job of assignment football

- A dice roll when tackling in the open field
- Failed geometry and takes some backwards-ass pursuit angles

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will_5198
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54. "RB Parris Campbell, Ohio State"
In response to Reply # 4
Wed Nov-21-18 12:06 AM by will_5198

  

          

I know, he's listed as a wide receiver, but he should really consider a move to the backfield. I haven't seen much evidence he can function outside the hashes in an NFL offense; he looks unnatural.

His "routes" are as if someone from a different sport was running them, with no direction at all. I've watched him jog through zone coverages like a kid lost in the mall. Hands are just as spotty, while he contorts his body to passes in the most awkward ways possible. And he's a senior!

On the positive side, he can break one at any time with his speed. If he gets into the right offense, with a proper screen game (Andy Reid), he could do damage. It'd be more productive to give him a few outside zone runs and get him linebacker-matched in coverage, rather than trying to turn him into a guy that can beat NFL corners. Because I don't think he can do the latter.

+ Easy acceleration and can score six off one wrong angle
+ Thick lower body, runs with strength and leverage (6'1, 208)
+ Faster Ty Montgomery

- Mud-walks in and out of breaks, I counted three-Mississippi watching him turning his body on a pivot route
- Has to hide his way into being open: quick screens, flat passes off motion and clear-out drags
- Doesn't show average receiving ability in any aspect of the position

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3xKrazy
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56. "missed his calling as a cornerback/return specialist"
In response to Reply # 54


          

  

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will_5198
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58. "watching Hill and McLaurin this year"
In response to Reply # 56


  

          

kind of proves how little Campbell has improved. they kept getting better and he's the same player as 2015.

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3xKrazy
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80. "they figured out how to use campbell a little bit too late"
In response to Reply # 58


          

his games against mich and NW were outstanding.

  

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BrooklynWHAT
Member since Jun 15th 2007
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57. "LOOOOL"
In response to Reply # 54


  

          


>
>- Mud-walks in and out of breaks, I counted three-Mississippi
>watching him turning his body on a pivot route

<--- Big Baller World Order

  

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will_5198
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63. "WR Collin Johnson, Texas"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

A linear player who can only run linear routes. When he's on the field he's probably running a go; maybe a slant or comeback. What works for him is his size -- he's a fluid 6'6 and has extremely long arms, letting him elevate for passes that most defenders can't reach. Throw it up there and see what happens.

What works against him, is also his size. Although he's smooth in straight lines, he doesn't have much lateral quickness and separation is nonexistent on short routes. Cornerbacks press him a lot, and his win rate isn't dominating -- he gets jabbed in the chest too much and his releases aren't sudden enough to break ankles.

His height and ball skills are worth a spot, but he's a lot more limited than he appears.

+ Great adjustments to off-target balls and finishes with strong hands
+ Nice build-up speed and knows how to press vertically
+ Box-out ability and elite extension

- Tall but thin (215 pounds), so he can get pushed around by tougher defenders
- Super limited route tree without the twitch to expand it much
- Blocking is pathetic for his frame
- Sort of a finesse player, who either catches a long touchdown or does a lot of nothing

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will_5198
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64. "WR Terry McLaurin, Ohio State"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

He could be a surprise 10-year pro. There's nothing flashy about his play, he just does his job and is where he's supposed to be on offense. Adequate size (6'1, 204) with plus overall athleticism, works the sideline well, has good releases, can take a hard step and get free over the middle…you know, receiver stuff.

Plus I love that he was under-recruited before hitting the camp trail, is a favorite of the coaching staff, and was named a two-time captain. The best part about him though? He is a demon on special teams. Doesn't return kicks, but he's the first one downfield in coverage and lays out for everything. That alone will keep him the league.

+ Named team captain as a junior, despite only having 10 career receptions before the season
+ Elite special teamer on coverage teams, and does so with a passion
+ Reliable player who runs his routes at proper depths and helps his quarterback with contested catches

- Doesn't pop off the screen and not a guy you target or game-plan against
- Probably has a 3rd/4th receiver ceiling in the NFL

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3xKrazy
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71. "huge improvement in his senior year"
In response to Reply # 64


          

was pretty much a complete liability as a WR up until this year.

special teams play has been phenomenal.

  

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will_5198
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72. "I'll be curious to see if Victor can make that leap in 2019*"
In response to Reply # 71


  

          

Victor makes a lot of easy things hard, which is a shame since he makes a lot of hard things easy.

* draft-eligible and Haskins seems on his way, but it'd be interesting to see what he could do with Dixon, Campbell and McLaurin gone

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3xKrazy
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73. "I'm not holding my breath on Victor"
In response to Reply # 72


          


>* draft-eligible and Haskins seems on his way, but it'd be
>interesting to see what he could do with Dixon, Campbell and
>McLaurin gone

KJ Hill prob gone too...

But I think the WR corps could actually be better (depending on who is throwing them the ball)with Austin Mack returning from injury, Olave and incoming stud Garrett Wilson.

Campbell is a special talent but not a true WR as we've discussed and Dixon and McLaurin are replaceable from an on-field talent perspective.

  

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will_5198
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82. "WR DaMarkus Lodge, Ole Miss"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

If only he could catch. He has plenty of moments that make you go "sheesh", including a deadly release off the line and snappy breaks that put corners on skates. Even at his height (6'2), he has feints and jab steps that are dare I say...Odell-esque.

As effortless as his separation skills are, I don't know if I've seen a draftable receiver this season who fights the ball more than he does. Drops are one thing, but he damn near looks like he's catching the ball with his palms facing inward. There is no pattern or reason to his receiving issues; his hands go from bad to OK to horrendous all in the same quarter. I've watched him completely whiff on a pass on a comeback -- wide-open, standstill -- as it zoomed through his cradled arms and banged off his shins out of bounds. He looked like a pinball bumper.

He'll still make a few dazzling plays, even spectacular catches, but this kind of issue rarely corrects itself at the next level. A tease.

+ Angular but bouncy target who combines some runaway speed with precision braking
+ Can straight up ghost even the best corners, leaving them yards behind
+ Makes a ridiculous play look routine

- A fucking seal when the ball is actually thrown his way
- Bristles at contact before it arrives
- Unreliable even at his best

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will_5198
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84. "LB Germaine Pratt, NC State"
In response to Reply # 4


  

          

Interesting guy. He switched from safety to linebacker as a sophomore, spent a redshirt year bulking up/coming back from injury, and then eventually became a full-time starter as a senior.

He definitely looks the part. The 20 pounds he added are seemingly all muscle, and he still kept plenty of footspeed from his days in the secondary. He's not really an extra defensive back, however -- he plays his keys in coverage, but I'd say he's more impressive as a reliable tackler who flows to the ball. Always around the action, and makes himself noticed.

He has some flexibility and length issues, but he's shown great development since last year and might have a ceiling as a league-average starter. Good depth piece that could be something more.

+ Very good wrap tackler (second in the ACC in stops, despite missing a game)
+ Patient in coverage and leads receivers into his help
+ Doesn't have an exceptional trait to force the issue, but will make a big play if you let him (sacks and interceptions)

- Can be a little hesitant attacking bigger bodies, as expected
- Short-armed, which affects him shedding blocks, defending passes and bringing down elite ball-carriers
- Surprisingly, hips are a tad stiff even for a linebacker

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will_5198
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5. "Late Rounds"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

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will_5198
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14. "S Chauncey Gardner-Johnson, Florida"
In response to Reply # 5


  

          

This guy was mocked as a first-rounder back in spring? Yeah, that's a no from me. I don't like his tackling, I don't like his coverage and I don't like his effort. I guess he could improve his form on the first two parts, but he gives up on a lot plays and lacks standout traits. It's scary to imagine him as anyone's last line of defense.

+ Can cover ground fairly quickly and has some ball skills over the top

- Ball-carriers run through him like tissue paper in the open field
- Big-time grabber in coverage to go with a sloppy backpedal
- Doesn't have an edge to him; receivers block him easily downfield and his pursuit is non-existent at times
- Used primarily near the line of scrimmage in college, but he's under six-feet-tall and barely two bills so NFL offenses are going to love that

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will_5198
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36. "he had much better games against LSU and Georgia"
In response to Reply # 14


  

          

still don't like him but credit is due

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will_5198
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19. "WR Ahmmon Richards, Miami-FL"
In response to Reply # 5


  

          

He jacked up his knee in the opener so he may end up returning for his senior year. Whether he declares or not, I still have no idea how he got first/second round talk over the summer. I realize preseason projections vary wildly, but the player I saw in 2017 should not have even cracked a top-100 watchlist.

How many receivers learn how to catch when they get to the NFL? Because right now, he pulls in passes like he doesn't have opposable thumbs. His quarterback has to split his numbers so he can cradle it, otherwise it's an exercise in how many ways he can drop a simple throw. To compound that fatal flaw, he also plays soft -- doesn't fight through contact, short-arms tight window passes, and is always a gentle breeze away from fumbling.

I'll keep an open mind if he waits until 2020. I just really dislike his game, and don't see his main issues improving much with time.

+ Has a kick to his movements and could be a dangerous route-runner with his quickness

- A receiver who is very bad at receiving passes
- Unpolished in all the other facets of being a receiver

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adg87
Member since Jun 22nd 2003
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27. "RE: WR Ahmmon Richards, Miami-FL"
In response to Reply # 19


  

          

Sad what happened to dude. Anytime a dream is derailed it's a travesty. Wishing him well.

************************************************************

Nigga, if the shoe fits, then buy the matching purse!" Rass Kass

  

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will_5198
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28. "yeah."
In response to Reply # 27


  

          

that summary seems rough in retrospect. but all the best to him.

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will_5198
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49. "WR David Sills, West Virginia"
In response to Reply # 5


  

          

For the past two years he's been on every Saturday highlight reel catching touchdowns, but I think there are considerable holes in his game.

One, he's not much of an athletic mismatch. His steps are stiff, and he is long out of his breaks. It doesn't matter in the Big 12 because he's spaced open in that offense, and can box out most college corners. But NFL cover-men -- even linebackers -- are going to clamp down on his routes. What you also don't see on the scoring clips is how inconsistent his hands are between the 20s. He can get disrupted by contact and he'll muff some easy throws, which is the opposite of how he plays near the goal-line.

Scoring touchdowns wins games, however, and I will say he's excellent at that. He's just a monster on fades and slants, with superb body control and gummy hands. He looks like a star when his team gets a first and goal.

I don't see him being one, though. Hard to keep a five-yard scoring specialist on the team unless he really contributes on coverage teams and gets better at uncovering himself against tight coverage.

+ Only listed at 6'3 but has great wingspan and seems like he's 6'5 when the ball is in the air
+ Always
+ Scoring
+ Touchdowns

- Has issues running past press, and lacks suddenness to free himself against zone
- Not a consistent player outside of goal-to-go situations
- If you only have one trick, NFL defenses usually find a way to negate it

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will_5198
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60. "RB Myles Gaskin, Washington"
In response to Reply # 5


  

          

He's a very good collegian without the special traits to be unique in the NFL.

Credit to him for compiling a great career -- he's started 50 of 52 games over the last four seasons, which for a running back, is a skill in and of itself. Probably the next best thing you can say about him is he plays with great balance, and is not overly bad at any one aspect of his position.

But there's lots working against him. He's small (5'10, 191) without great burst or long speed. He is only average in the open field, and too often gets brought down by the defender he's supposed to make miss. He runs in a great system and behind a very good line, but despite free lanes into the second level, he'll just get the requisite 6-8 yards.

You know how it goes, familiarity breeds contempt. His best chance is to catch on as a third-stringer due to his well-roundedness.

+ Slippery runner with noted durability
+ Master of none but contributes in all phases of his position
+ Sharp hands when targeted (not usually)

- Leaving college with nearly 1,000 touches on his sub-200-pound frame
- His lack of speed makes him easy to track and he leaves yards on the field
- Textbook "super college player" whose talent falls just short of NFL baselines

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will_5198
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79. "WR Olamide Zaccheaus, Virginia"
In response to Reply # 5


  

          

A late-rounder, but one I'm actually excited about. His limitations are tied to his size (5'8, 190), as he's a small target without the track speed to frighten people. There are a lot of big and fast receivers these days -- he isn't going to make much of an impression when they line up at pro day.

But man, he's as reliable as they come in the short passing game. Runs a varied route grouping from the slot, with a lot of feints and second moves that accentuate his quickness. Fantastic hands as well, even for being an undersized guy who has to fight through defenders. He sneaks his way open and knows how to get the ball.

He needs to become a core special teamer to make it, but if I'm getting to the end of my depth chart at receiver, he could be a solid short-term contributor.

+ Has caught 250(!) career receptions at Virginia
+ Accomplished route-runner who works every trick he knows
+ Easy adjustments to passes, and has a better catch radius than you think

- Noticeably undersized and limited in what he can do against NFL coverages
- Professional corners and safeties are going to bother him with their length
- Has to be hidden or spaced out of the play in the running game
- Uses angles and burst well, but not the greatest YAC receiver

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will_5198
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6. "UDFA"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

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T Reynolds
Member since Apr 16th 2007
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Wed Oct-31-18 10:42 AM

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38. "Just hoping this draft is not as thin at OL and QB as this post suggests"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

*shudders*

  

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will_5198
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39. "I'm still diving into OL but there are guys I like"
In response to Reply # 38


  

          

bad year for quarterbacks though

the fact Herbert's brother is a HS senior committed to Oregon, and Herbert was born in Eugene, makes it seriously credible that he stays another season

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Frank Longo
Member since Nov 18th 2003
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44. "Kiper just put Duke QB Daniel Jones in his 1st round mock."
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

Never thought I’d see a Duke QB with this much NFL hype.

Hungry Hippos: The Movie. Now available to read: http://www.russellhainline.com.

  

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will_5198
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45. "yeah, more to come on this"
In response to Reply # 44


  

          

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Orbit_Established
Member since Oct 27th 2002
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65. "Seen 2 fully Kyler Murray games. Haven't seen 5 better QBs in my life."
In response to Reply # 0
Sat Dec-01-18 03:53 PM by Orbit_Established

  

          

I wanna hear your breakdown

Obviously he's going to play baseball but still

  

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will_5198
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66. "he's fun. "
In response to Reply # 65


  

          

but to be honest I haven't even watched him with that in mind, since he's got that guaranteed money in baseball.

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Orbit_Established
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68. "Kiper/one of them said &quot;wouldn't last past the 2nd round.&quot; "
In response to Reply # 66
Sun Dec-02-18 12:00 AM by Orbit_Established

  

          

>but to be honest I haven't even watched him with that in
>mind, since he's got that guaranteed money in baseball.

But he's breathtaking and I'm guessing that score
is colored by the fact that everyone knows he's
playing baseball

Man...I justsaw dude dissect and process and come off his
2nd and 3rds and throw lazers everywhere

He's faster than most DBs he faced and still sits
glued in the pocket

It's really something else

  

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IsaIsaIsa
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67. "Great college FB player."
In response to Reply # 65


  

          


www.Tupreme.com

  

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