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c71
Member since Jan 15th 2008
8786 posts
Fri Sep-15-17 08:01 PM

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"Nine Secrets of Motivated People - swipe"


  

          

(I'm going to critique this as I heavily edit this)


1. When you make a plan, anticipate bumps

Before even trying to achieve a goal, target potential pitfalls and troubleshoot them. Peter Gollwitzer, a professor of psychology at New York University, in New York City, says that people who plan for obstacles are more likely to stick with projects than those who don't.


2. Channel the little engine that could - really

A person's drive is often based on what she believes about her abilities, not on how objectively talented she is, according to research by Albert Bandura, a professor of psychology at Stanford University. His work has shown that people who have perceived self-efficacy (that is, the belief that they can accomplish what they set out to do) perform better than those who don't.


3. Don't let your goals run wild....but work on them every day

When your sights are too ambitious, they can backfire, burn you out, and actually become demotivating, says Lisa Ordonez, a professor of management and organizations at the Eller College of Management, at the University of Arizona, in Tuscon.

According to Daniel Pink, author of Drive: The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us (Riverhead, $27), taking small steps every day will not only help hold your interest in what you're trying to achieve but will also ensure that you move slowly, but surely, toward your goal.


4. Go Public with it

Instead of keeping your intentions to yourself, make them known to many....After all, it's harder to abandon a dream when you know that people are tracking your progress.

(uh, it shouldn't be surprising that I'm choosing to critique this article at this point....This suggestion has been cautioned against in many of my readings due to the reality that many people aren't "encouragers" and a dream may need to "incubate" for a significant amount of time without too many "naysayers" at first - especially if you are inclined to be easily discouraged and somewhat "self-destructive"/"self-sabotaging" to the point of informing people you know are going to give you lot's of negative energy and feedback)


5. Lean on a support crew when you're struggling

Think of the friends and family who truly want to see you succeed. Enlisting those with whom you have authentic relationships is key when your motivation begins to wane.


6. Make yourself a priority

(don't let yourself be sidetracked by too many demands)


7. Challenge yourself - and change things up

It's hard to remain enthusiastic when everything stays the same, says Frank Busch, who has coached three Olympic swimming teams. To keep his athletes motivated, he constantly challenges and surprises them.....


8. Keep on learning

To refuel your efforts, focus on enjoying the process of getting to the goal, rather than just eyeing the finish line.


9. Remember the deeper meaning

You're more likely to realize a goal when it has true personal significance to you, according to Edward L. Deci. a professor of psychology at the University of Rochester, in New York (For example, "I want to learn to speak French so I can communicate with my Canadian relatives" is more powerful reason than "I should learn French so that I can be a more cultured person.") And when the process isn't a pleasant one, it helps to recall that personal meaning

  

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Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
RE: Nine Secrets of Motivated People - swipe
Oct 07th 2017
1
RE: Nine Secrets of Motivated People - swipe
Oct 07th 2017
2
Mental contrasting as a tool for behavior change - swipe
Oct 28th 2017
3

obsidianchrysalis
Member since Jan 29th 2003
6207 posts
Sat Oct-07-17 12:20 AM

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1. "RE: Nine Secrets of Motivated People - swipe"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

>1. When you make a plan, anticipate bumps
>
>Before even trying to achieve a goal, target potential
>pitfalls and troubleshoot them. Peter Gollwitzer, a professor
>of psychology at New York University, in New York City, says
>that people who plan for obstacles are more likely to stick
>with projects than those who don't.

This is a good suggestion. My progress towards accomplishments improves when my awareness of the process of gaining knowledge or skill or motivation becomes realistic. When I feel that the accomplishment won't have include periods of doubt or sagging motivation, procrastination kicks in.
>

>2. Channel the little engine that could - really
>
>A person's drive is often based on what she believes about her
>abilities, not on how objectively talented she is, according
>to research by Albert Bandura, a professor of psychology at
>Stanford University. His work has shown that people who have
>perceived self-efficacy (that is, the belief that they can
>accomplish what they set out to do) perform better than those
>who don't.

Hmm... This hasn't been true in my life. Some of accomplishments I am most proud of came when I really didn't know the accomplishment was possible. I just tried anyway.
>
>3. Don't let your goals run wild....but work on them every
>day
>
>When your sights are too ambitious, they can backfire, burn
>you out, and actually become demotivating, says Lisa Ordonez,
>a professor of management and organizations at the Eller
>College of Management, at the University of Arizona, in
>Tuscon.
>
>According to Daniel Pink, author of Drive: The Surprising
>Truth about What Motivates Us (Riverhead, $27), taking small
>steps every day will not only help hold your interest in what
>you're trying to achieve but will also ensure that you move
>slowly, but surely, toward your goal.

I struggle with this. I have ebbs and flows of motivation and energy like anyone else, but the disparity between my moments of drive are likely because I try to do too much at a given time rather than do less than my capabilities and save some of that motivation for later.

If you have time and want to read about this subject from another persppective, a productivity blogger named James Clear talks about this in his writing. He has a message of 'average speed' which describes this point in detail.

>4. Go Public with it
>
>Instead of keeping your intentions to yourself, make them
>known to many....After all, it's harder to abandon a dream
>when you know that people are tracking your progress.
>
>(uh, it shouldn't be surprising that I'm choosing to critique
>this article at this point....This suggestion has been
>cautioned against in many of my readings due to the reality
>that many people aren't "encouragers" and a dream may need to
>"incubate" for a significant amount of time without too many
>"naysayers" at first - especially if you are inclined to be
>easily discouraged and somewhat
>"self-destructive"/"self-sabotaging" to the point of informing
>people you know are going to give you lot's of negative energy
>and feedback)

I agree with your take but for a different reason. I've told people of various goals, hoping that by opening up about them I'll feel accountable, but usually if I keep the goal a secret and then tell people about my progress, my motivation increases. Weird.

>5. Lean on a support crew when you're struggling
>
>Think of the friends and family who truly want to see you
>succeed. Enlisting those with whom you have authentic
>relationships is key when your motivation begins to wane.
>

Essential

>6. Make yourself a priority
>
>(don't let yourself be sidetracked by too many demands)
>

It's hard to carve out time for a self-care routine, but things like meditation and exercise and downtime maintains my motivation and keeps me from burning myself out. Plus, in the end, the reasons we want to be productive is for ourselves in some capacity. Taking time to tend to ourselves along the way keeps the goal from becoming overwhelming if it doesn't seem possible to rest until that goal is reached.

>
>7. Challenge yourself - and change things up
>
>It's hard to remain enthusiastic when everything stays the
>same, says Frank Busch, who has coached three Olympic swimming
>teams. To keep his athletes motivated, he constantly
>challenges and surprises them.....
>

Another struggle of mine, but different activities can bring a fresh perspective.

>
>8. Keep on learning
>
>To refuel your efforts, focus on enjoying the process of
>getting to the goal, rather than just eyeing the finish line.
>

I'm trying to get to this point. I'm a work in progress but looking at the goal in entirety, the learning of skills, building of motivation, and the feeling of success, helps me keep perspective.
>

>9. Remember the deeper meaning
>
>You're more likely to realize a goal when it has true personal
>significance to you, according to Edward L. Deci. a professor
>of psychology at the University of Rochester, in New York (For
>example, "I want to learn to speak French so I can communicate
>with my Canadian relatives" is more powerful reason than "I
>should learn French so that I can be a more cultured person.")
>And when the process isn't a pleasant one, it helps to recall
>that personal meaning
>

Purpose counts for a lot. It's a very powerful motivator.

  

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c71
Member since Jan 15th 2008
8786 posts
Sat Oct-07-17 06:20 AM

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2. "RE: Nine Secrets of Motivated People - swipe"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          


>If you have time and want to read about this subject from
>another persppective, a productivity blogger named James Clear
>talks about this in his writing. He has a message of 'average
>speed' which describes this point in detail.
>


You should sum up some of James Clear concepts (average speed and a few others) etc. for this post or another post. Briefly or however you want to do it.

  

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c71
Member since Jan 15th 2008
8786 posts
Sat Oct-28-17 11:35 AM

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3. "Mental contrasting as a tool for behavior change - swipe"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/science-choice/201710/use-problem-solving-strategy-achieve-any-goal


Shahram Heshmat Ph.D.

Science of Choice

Use This Problem-Solving Strategy to Achieve Any Goal
Mental contrasting as a tool for behavior change.

Posted Oct 27, 2017


The key to successful goal pursuit depends on

The key to successful goal pursuit depends on solving two sequential tasks: goal setting and goal implementation. The first step involves converting desirable wishes into strong goal commitment aiding subsequent goal striving and achievement.

However, setting a desirable goal does not guarantee that one actually commits to and strives for the realization of the goal. One has to be motivated and committed to reach the goal. The two key questions are: How do you arrive at a strong commitment to attain your desirable goal? How would you deal with potential distractions? The mental contrasting approach can help to answer these questions.

Mental contrasting is a problem-solving strategy for achieving goals. The strategy implies vividly imagining a desired future or health goal (e.g., overcoming a bad habit, giving a good presentation), anticipating obstacles for realizing this future and making plans on how to overcome the obstacles to reach the desired goal (Oettigen, 2014).

Mentally contrasting a positive future with the present reality motivates behavior change. The imagination of a desired future (e.g., losing 10 pounds) motivates the person to cope with obstacles (e.g., lack of motivation to exercise, or temptation to indulge) in order to attain goals.

Mental contrasting is different from fantasizing, such as indulging in thoughts about the positive future that seduces a person to mentally enjoy the future in the moment (e.g., how nice it would be to lose 10 pounds). Unfortunately, dreamers get nowhere in life without becoming doers. Positive fantasies hold people from achieving their goal. Indulging in the desired future ignores possible obstacles and therefore conceals the necessity to act.

On the other hand, merely dwelling on present reality does not give direction of where to go. By imagining the future and then imagining obstacles of reality, one recognizes that measures need to be taken to overcome the status quo to achieve the desired future.

In The Power of Negative Thinking (2013), Bobby Knight, the basketball coach, writes that having the will to win is not enough, what matters is having the will to prepare to win. That includes preparation and the elimination of mistakes.

The mental contrasting strategy has four steps: wish, outcome, obstacle, and plan (It’s called WOOP).

First, find your wish, and deliberate in detail about your desired goal. The more specific the goal, the better able people are to reach it.

Second, vividly imagine the best thing you associate with having achieved that outcome, such as a smaller waistline, or a new job.

Third, ask yourself what is holding you back from achieving your wish?

Finally, formulate an “if-then” plan for what you’ll do when that obstacle arises. “When the waiter is taking my order in my favorite restaurant tomorrow, I will order a salad.” “If I find myself checking Twitter, I’ll get up from my desk immediately.” Forming if-then plan automates goal striving by strategically linking critical situations (e.g., encountering a temptation) to goal-directed responses (e.g., coping with temptations).

Recent intervention studies (Oettingen, 2014) have shown that mental contrasting can be easily used by people of all ages and backgrounds to change their behaviors, such as engaging in more physical activity and eating fewer calories. For example, in a study on smoking cessation, mental contrasting of a negative future (e.g., lung disease) with the positive reality that needs to be preserved (e.g., healthy breathing) motivated participants to avoid cigarette consumption.

In sum, mental contrasting helps to achieve your wishes. This technique integrates one’s fantasies with a clear sense of reality. And then develops a plan that will help you avoid or address the anticipated hurdles.

References

Knight Bob (2013) The Power of Negative Thinking. New Harvest

Oettingen, G. (2014). Rethinking Positive Thinking: Inside the New Science of Motivation. New York, NY: Penguin Random House.

  

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