Printer-friendly copy Email this topic to a friend
Lobby Organix topic #1768

Subject: "Nine Secrets of Motivated People - swipe" Previous topic | Next topic
c71
Member since Jan 15th 2008
10011 posts
Fri Sep-15-17 08:01 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
"Nine Secrets of Motivated People - swipe"


  

          

(I'm going to critique this as I heavily edit this)


1. When you make a plan, anticipate bumps

Before even trying to achieve a goal, target potential pitfalls and troubleshoot them. Peter Gollwitzer, a professor of psychology at New York University, in New York City, says that people who plan for obstacles are more likely to stick with projects than those who don't.


2. Channel the little engine that could - really

A person's drive is often based on what she believes about her abilities, not on how objectively talented she is, according to research by Albert Bandura, a professor of psychology at Stanford University. His work has shown that people who have perceived self-efficacy (that is, the belief that they can accomplish what they set out to do) perform better than those who don't.


3. Don't let your goals run wild....but work on them every day

When your sights are too ambitious, they can backfire, burn you out, and actually become demotivating, says Lisa Ordonez, a professor of management and organizations at the Eller College of Management, at the University of Arizona, in Tuscon.

According to Daniel Pink, author of Drive: The Surprising Truth about What Motivates Us (Riverhead, $27), taking small steps every day will not only help hold your interest in what you're trying to achieve but will also ensure that you move slowly, but surely, toward your goal.


4. Go Public with it

Instead of keeping your intentions to yourself, make them known to many....After all, it's harder to abandon a dream when you know that people are tracking your progress.

(uh, it shouldn't be surprising that I'm choosing to critique this article at this point....This suggestion has been cautioned against in many of my readings due to the reality that many people aren't "encouragers" and a dream may need to "incubate" for a significant amount of time without too many "naysayers" at first - especially if you are inclined to be easily discouraged and somewhat "self-destructive"/"self-sabotaging" to the point of informing people you know are going to give you lot's of negative energy and feedback)


5. Lean on a support crew when you're struggling

Think of the friends and family who truly want to see you succeed. Enlisting those with whom you have authentic relationships is key when your motivation begins to wane.


6. Make yourself a priority

(don't let yourself be sidetracked by too many demands)


7. Challenge yourself - and change things up

It's hard to remain enthusiastic when everything stays the same, says Frank Busch, who has coached three Olympic swimming teams. To keep his athletes motivated, he constantly challenges and surprises them.....


8. Keep on learning

To refuel your efforts, focus on enjoying the process of getting to the goal, rather than just eyeing the finish line.


9. Remember the deeper meaning

You're more likely to realize a goal when it has true personal significance to you, according to Edward L. Deci. a professor of psychology at the University of Rochester, in New York (For example, "I want to learn to speak French so I can communicate with my Canadian relatives" is more powerful reason than "I should learn French so that I can be a more cultured person.") And when the process isn't a pleasant one, it helps to recall that personal meaning

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top


Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
RE: Nine Secrets of Motivated People - swipe
Oct 07th 2017
1
RE: Nine Secrets of Motivated People - swipe
Oct 07th 2017
2
Mental contrasting as a tool for behavior change - swipe
Oct 28th 2017
3
11 Signs You're Going To Be Successful - Psychology today
Jul 30th 2018
4

obsidianchrysalis
Member since Jan 29th 2003
6799 posts
Sat Oct-07-17 12:20 AM

Click to send email to this author Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
1. "RE: Nine Secrets of Motivated People - swipe"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

>1. When you make a plan, anticipate bumps
>
>Before even trying to achieve a goal, target potential
>pitfalls and troubleshoot them. Peter Gollwitzer, a professor
>of psychology at New York University, in New York City, says
>that people who plan for obstacles are more likely to stick
>with projects than those who don't.

This is a good suggestion. My progress towards accomplishments improves when my awareness of the process of gaining knowledge or skill or motivation becomes realistic. When I feel that the accomplishment won't have include periods of doubt or sagging motivation, procrastination kicks in.
>

>2. Channel the little engine that could - really
>
>A person's drive is often based on what she believes about her
>abilities, not on how objectively talented she is, according
>to research by Albert Bandura, a professor of psychology at
>Stanford University. His work has shown that people who have
>perceived self-efficacy (that is, the belief that they can
>accomplish what they set out to do) perform better than those
>who don't.

Hmm... This hasn't been true in my life. Some of accomplishments I am most proud of came when I really didn't know the accomplishment was possible. I just tried anyway.
>
>3. Don't let your goals run wild....but work on them every
>day
>
>When your sights are too ambitious, they can backfire, burn
>you out, and actually become demotivating, says Lisa Ordonez,
>a professor of management and organizations at the Eller
>College of Management, at the University of Arizona, in
>Tuscon.
>
>According to Daniel Pink, author of Drive: The Surprising
>Truth about What Motivates Us (Riverhead, $27), taking small
>steps every day will not only help hold your interest in what
>you're trying to achieve but will also ensure that you move
>slowly, but surely, toward your goal.

I struggle with this. I have ebbs and flows of motivation and energy like anyone else, but the disparity between my moments of drive are likely because I try to do too much at a given time rather than do less than my capabilities and save some of that motivation for later.

If you have time and want to read about this subject from another persppective, a productivity blogger named James Clear talks about this in his writing. He has a message of 'average speed' which describes this point in detail.

>4. Go Public with it
>
>Instead of keeping your intentions to yourself, make them
>known to many....After all, it's harder to abandon a dream
>when you know that people are tracking your progress.
>
>(uh, it shouldn't be surprising that I'm choosing to critique
>this article at this point....This suggestion has been
>cautioned against in many of my readings due to the reality
>that many people aren't "encouragers" and a dream may need to
>"incubate" for a significant amount of time without too many
>"naysayers" at first - especially if you are inclined to be
>easily discouraged and somewhat
>"self-destructive"/"self-sabotaging" to the point of informing
>people you know are going to give you lot's of negative energy
>and feedback)

I agree with your take but for a different reason. I've told people of various goals, hoping that by opening up about them I'll feel accountable, but usually if I keep the goal a secret and then tell people about my progress, my motivation increases. Weird.

>5. Lean on a support crew when you're struggling
>
>Think of the friends and family who truly want to see you
>succeed. Enlisting those with whom you have authentic
>relationships is key when your motivation begins to wane.
>

Essential

>6. Make yourself a priority
>
>(don't let yourself be sidetracked by too many demands)
>

It's hard to carve out time for a self-care routine, but things like meditation and exercise and downtime maintains my motivation and keeps me from burning myself out. Plus, in the end, the reasons we want to be productive is for ourselves in some capacity. Taking time to tend to ourselves along the way keeps the goal from becoming overwhelming if it doesn't seem possible to rest until that goal is reached.

>
>7. Challenge yourself - and change things up
>
>It's hard to remain enthusiastic when everything stays the
>same, says Frank Busch, who has coached three Olympic swimming
>teams. To keep his athletes motivated, he constantly
>challenges and surprises them.....
>

Another struggle of mine, but different activities can bring a fresh perspective.

>
>8. Keep on learning
>
>To refuel your efforts, focus on enjoying the process of
>getting to the goal, rather than just eyeing the finish line.
>

I'm trying to get to this point. I'm a work in progress but looking at the goal in entirety, the learning of skills, building of motivation, and the feeling of success, helps me keep perspective.
>

>9. Remember the deeper meaning
>
>You're more likely to realize a goal when it has true personal
>significance to you, according to Edward L. Deci. a professor
>of psychology at the University of Rochester, in New York (For
>example, "I want to learn to speak French so I can communicate
>with my Canadian relatives" is more powerful reason than "I
>should learn French so that I can be a more cultured person.")
>And when the process isn't a pleasant one, it helps to recall
>that personal meaning
>

Purpose counts for a lot. It's a very powerful motivator.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

    
c71
Member since Jan 15th 2008
10011 posts
Sat Oct-07-17 06:20 AM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
2. "RE: Nine Secrets of Motivated People - swipe"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          


>If you have time and want to read about this subject from
>another persppective, a productivity blogger named James Clear
>talks about this in his writing. He has a message of 'average
>speed' which describes this point in detail.
>


You should sum up some of James Clear concepts (average speed and a few others) etc. for this post or another post. Briefly or however you want to do it.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

c71
Member since Jan 15th 2008
10011 posts
Sat Oct-28-17 11:35 AM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
3. "Mental contrasting as a tool for behavior change - swipe"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/science-choice/201710/use-problem-solving-strategy-achieve-any-goal


Shahram Heshmat Ph.D.

Science of Choice

Use This Problem-Solving Strategy to Achieve Any Goal
Mental contrasting as a tool for behavior change.

Posted Oct 27, 2017


The key to successful goal pursuit depends on

The key to successful goal pursuit depends on solving two sequential tasks: goal setting and goal implementation. The first step involves converting desirable wishes into strong goal commitment aiding subsequent goal striving and achievement.

However, setting a desirable goal does not guarantee that one actually commits to and strives for the realization of the goal. One has to be motivated and committed to reach the goal. The two key questions are: How do you arrive at a strong commitment to attain your desirable goal? How would you deal with potential distractions? The mental contrasting approach can help to answer these questions.

Mental contrasting is a problem-solving strategy for achieving goals. The strategy implies vividly imagining a desired future or health goal (e.g., overcoming a bad habit, giving a good presentation), anticipating obstacles for realizing this future and making plans on how to overcome the obstacles to reach the desired goal (Oettigen, 2014).

Mentally contrasting a positive future with the present reality motivates behavior change. The imagination of a desired future (e.g., losing 10 pounds) motivates the person to cope with obstacles (e.g., lack of motivation to exercise, or temptation to indulge) in order to attain goals.

Mental contrasting is different from fantasizing, such as indulging in thoughts about the positive future that seduces a person to mentally enjoy the future in the moment (e.g., how nice it would be to lose 10 pounds). Unfortunately, dreamers get nowhere in life without becoming doers. Positive fantasies hold people from achieving their goal. Indulging in the desired future ignores possible obstacles and therefore conceals the necessity to act.

On the other hand, merely dwelling on present reality does not give direction of where to go. By imagining the future and then imagining obstacles of reality, one recognizes that measures need to be taken to overcome the status quo to achieve the desired future.

In The Power of Negative Thinking (2013), Bobby Knight, the basketball coach, writes that having the will to win is not enough, what matters is having the will to prepare to win. That includes preparation and the elimination of mistakes.

The mental contrasting strategy has four steps: wish, outcome, obstacle, and plan (It’s called WOOP).

First, find your wish, and deliberate in detail about your desired goal. The more specific the goal, the better able people are to reach it.

Second, vividly imagine the best thing you associate with having achieved that outcome, such as a smaller waistline, or a new job.

Third, ask yourself what is holding you back from achieving your wish?

Finally, formulate an “if-then” plan for what you’ll do when that obstacle arises. “When the waiter is taking my order in my favorite restaurant tomorrow, I will order a salad.” “If I find myself checking Twitter, I’ll get up from my desk immediately.” Forming if-then plan automates goal striving by strategically linking critical situations (e.g., encountering a temptation) to goal-directed responses (e.g., coping with temptations).

Recent intervention studies (Oettingen, 2014) have shown that mental contrasting can be easily used by people of all ages and backgrounds to change their behaviors, such as engaging in more physical activity and eating fewer calories. For example, in a study on smoking cessation, mental contrasting of a negative future (e.g., lung disease) with the positive reality that needs to be preserved (e.g., healthy breathing) motivated participants to avoid cigarette consumption.

In sum, mental contrasting helps to achieve your wishes. This technique integrates one’s fantasies with a clear sense of reality. And then develops a plan that will help you avoid or address the anticipated hurdles.

References

Knight Bob (2013) The Power of Negative Thinking. New Harvest

Oettingen, G. (2014). Rethinking Positive Thinking: Inside the New Science of Motivation. New York, NY: Penguin Random House.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

c71
Member since Jan 15th 2008
10011 posts
Mon Jul-30-18 12:18 PM

Click to send private message to this authorClick to view this author's profileClick to add this author to your buddy list
4. "11 Signs You're Going To Be Successful - Psychology today"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

https://start.att.net/news/read/category/news/article/business_insider-11_signs_youre_going_to_be_successful_even_if_it_d-newscred2


11 Signs You're Going To Be Successful, Even If It Doesn't Feel Like It


Business Insider


Success isn't just about money, power, and fame. Personal fulfillment and making an impact count for something, too.


We collected a series of indicators that you're going to be more successful than you think. Those include being open to failure and making time every day to learn.

If even a few of these signs sound familiar to you, you're making good progress.

If you're pursuing your passions, if you're learning, and if you're forging solid relationships, you're probably on track to do great things — even if you aren't extraordinarily famous or wealthy.

Below, we've listed a series of signs — based on research and expert opinion — that you're doing better at this thing called life than you'd be inclined to believe.


You're always looking for a better way to do things


Are you stuck in the past — or hurtling toward the future?


On an episode of Business Insider's podcast, "Success! How I Did It," John Sculley, a former Apple CEO and president of Pepsi, said throughout his career he's always asked questions like, "Why is it done this way?" He said success is largely about to the willingness "to solve a problem in a way that's never been solved before."

The opposite trait — resistance to change — can stall your career, the same way it stalls big companies' progress. That's according to Scott Galloway, a clinical professor of marketing at New York University's Stern School of Business, the founder of the digital intelligence firm L2, and the author of the new book "The Four: The Hidden DNA of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google."

In his book, Galloway writes: "Trying to resist this tide of change will drown you. Successful people in the digital age are those who go to work every day, not dreading the net change, but asking: 'What if we did it this way?'"


You have a vision for the kind of life you want


Granted, that vision may evolve over time. But the point is not to take a job exclusively for the short-term benefits — like compensation.

As Nathaniel Koloc, former ReWork CEO, told The Harvard Business Review, instead of asking yourself, "What job do I want?" you should be asking yourself, "What life do I want?" And how does this gig fit into the broader picture?

Even if you only have a vision for the year ahead, career coach and former Googler Jenny Blake recommends asking yourself questions like, "What does my ideal average day look like?" and "What kinds of people do I want to be connected with or meeting?"


You're using your 'signature strengths'


Your signature strengths are simply the skills you're uniquely good at.

As Eric Barker, author of "Barking Up the Wrong Tree," previously told Business Insider, research suggests that "the more often you use those skills, the more you're happier, you're respected, you feel good about your job." What's more, "if you're using those skills in your job, you're going to achieve more."


You're open to failure


Galloway says the four major tech titans — Apple, Google, Facebook, and Amazon — are all open to occasional failure, if it means they're trying something new. If you want to be successful in your own career, you should be the same way.

As Galloway previously told Business Insider, "If you are not in your own professional life and your professional career kind of wiping out and getting beaned in the face every once in a while, you aren't trying hard enough."


You're willing to take calculated risks


You'd be hard pressed to find a successful person who hasn't taken some amount of risk in their career.

Take Hearst executive Joanna Coles, for example. As a young newspaper reporter, Coles once burst in on a woman in a bathroom stall in an attempt to land a scoop. Later, she left her job as a foreign correspondent for the Times of London and took a job in magazine journalism — even though she was pregnant and didn't have a visa that would allow her to say in New York.

Meanwhile, Jeff Bezos, CEO of Amazon and the richest man in the world, has spoken often about how he decides which risks to pursue. In one interview, Bezos explained how he decided to found Amazon:

"I knew that when I was 80, I was not going to regret having tried this. I was not going to regret trying to participate in this thing called the Internet that I thought was going to be a really big deal. I knew that if I failed, I wouldn't regret that.

"But I knew the one thing I might regret is not ever having tried. I knew that that would haunt me every day."


You're nice to people — even if they're not your superiors


On another episode of "Success! How I Did It," Coles described the importance of maintaining good relationships with your friends and colleagues. She said:

"The thing that I always try and say to young people starting out is your peer group is really the most important influence on your life because you are going to rise and fall together. And I have always got jobs through the loose ties of friendships and someone knowing someone who might know a job. And, you know, a group of you will start out together, and they sort of pull you with them."

Her number-one life tip? "Don't be an a--hole."


You exhibit a 'beginner's mind'


That's a concept from Zen Buddhism, and it describes constantly seeing the world anew, as if you didn't know anything about it. It's a big advantage in business.

The late Steve Jobs was a proponent of the beginner's mind. As Jeff Yang wrote in The Wall Street Journal in 2011, Jobs emphasized the need to develop a beginner's mind in order to eschew the constraints that cause us to come up with old answers to difficult problems.

And Salesforce CEO Marc Benioff told The Wall Street Journal: "I kind of try to let go of all the things that have ever happened so far in our industry, which is a lot of stuff, and just go, OK, what's going to happen right now?"


You make time every day to learn


You should be allotting some of your time to reading or research — something that expands your horizons.

Beth Comstock, former vice chair of General Electric, recommends devoting 10% of every workday to these activities. In an interview with LinkedIn, Comstock shared some career advice:

"The first thing you have to say to people is: Make room for discovery. If I manage myself, I manage a team, I manage a division, there's a certain amount of your budget, your time, your people that need to be focused on what's next.

"And it could be 10% — you know for yourself. I think usually 10% is a pretty good way to think about it.

"Think about how you manage your own time. Can I spend 10% of my time a week reading, going to sites like Singularity, TED, talking to people, going to industry events, asking people: What trends are you seeing? What are you nervous about? What are you excited about?"


You're self-aware


According to Tasha Eurich, an organizational psychologist and the author of "Insight," most people don't know how others really see them. Those who have a more accurate picture of how they're coming off tend to be more successful.

Eurich recommends finding one or two "loving critics," or "people who will be honest with us while still having our best interests at heart." Tap them regularly for insight into how you can perform better at work.

Executive coach Marshall Goldsmith goes so far as to say that what other people think of you matters even more than how you see yourself. In his book "What Got You Here Won't Get You There," Goldsmith writes:

"If we can stop, listen, and think about what others are seeing in us, we have a great opportunity. We can compare the self that we want to be with the self that we are presenting to the rest of the world. We can then begin to make the real changes that are needed to close the gap between our stated values and our actual behavior."


You show gratitude



Gratitude can benefit your relationships, your health, and your career.

Doug Conant is known for turning around Campbell's Soup as its CEO. He's also known for making gratitude a key leadership strategy: Throughout his career at Campbell's, he sent more than 30,000 handwritten thank-you notes to staffers and clients.

Other famous and successful people have a daily gratitude practice. For example, John Paul DeJoria takes the first five minutes of the day to "be thankful for life."


You're self-compassionate


Self-compassion doesn't make you weak or unambitious. Instead, scientists say it can make you more successful.

Research on self-compassion suggests that it has three components: engaging in a positive internal dialogue, understanding that everyone makes mistakes, and being aware of your thoughts and feelings without succumbing to them.

In "The Happiness Track," Emma Seppala, science director of Stanford's Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education. recommends one strategy for practicing self-compassion: Treat yourself as you would treat a colleague or friend who has failed.


This article was written by Shana Lebowitz from Business Insider and was legally licensed through the NewsCred publisher network. Please direct all licensing questions to legal@newscred.com.

  

Printer-friendly copy | Reply | Reply with quote | Top

Lobby Organix topic #1768 Previous topic | Next topic
Powered by DCForum+ Version 1.25
Copyright © DCScripts.com