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Subject: "The Charisma Myth by Olivia Fox Cabane - excerpts from the book" Previous topic | Next topic
c71
Member since Jan 15th 2008
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Mon Aug-07-17 02:33 PM

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"The Charisma Myth by Olivia Fox Cabane - excerpts from the book"


  

          

The Charisma Myth: How anyone can master the art and science of personal magnetism by Olivia Fox Cabane


p 84 - 85

Self-compassion is how much warmth we can have for ourselves, especially when we're going through a difficult experience.

It's quite possible for people to have high self-confidence but low self-esteem and very low self-compasssion. Like Helen, these people may consider themselves fairly competent, but they don't necessarily like themselves any more for it, and they can be very hard on themselves when they don't succeed.

Recent behavioral science research indicates that it may be healthier to focus on self-compassion than on self-esteem. The former is based on self-acceptance, the latter on self-evaluation and social comparison. Self-esteem is more of a roller coaster, contingent on how believe we compare to others. It also tends to correlate with narcissism.

Individuals who score high on self-compassion scales demonstrate greater emotional resilience to daily difficulties and fewer negative reactions to difficult situations, such as receiving unflattering feedback. Higher self-compassion predicts a greater sense of personal responsibility for the outcome of events: it helps predict levels of accountability. People who score high on self-compassion also have a lower tendency for denial. That makes sense: personal mistakes would generate less self-criticism, so people would be more willing to admit to them.

When they hear the term self-compassion, people often assume it is synonymous with self-indulgence or self-pity. Surprisingly, the opposite is true. Solid behavioral science research shows that the higher one's level of self-compassion, the lower one's level of self-pity. You can think of the difference between the two this way: self-compassion is feeling that what happened to you is unfortunate, whereas self-pity is feeling that what happened to you is unfair. In this way, self-pity can lead to resentment or bitterness, and to feeling more isolated and alienated. In contrast, self-compassion often leads to increased feelings of connectedness.

Self-compassion is what helps us forgive ourselves when we've fallen short; it's what prevents internal criticism from taking over and playing across our face, ruining our charisma potential. In this way, self-compassion is critical to emanating warmth.

Interestingly, self-compassion can also help you emanate greater self-confidence.


p 86 - 87

Kristin Neff, one of compassion's foremost researchers, defines self-compassion as a three-step process: First, realizing that we're experiencing difficulties. Second, responding with kindness and understanding toward ourselves when we are suffering or feel inadequate, rather than being harshly self-critical. Third, realizing that whatever we're going through is commonly experienced by all human beings, and remembering that everyone goes through difficult times.

When things go wrong in our lives, it's easy to feel that other people are having an easier time. Recognizing instead that everyone at some point has had or will have the very experience you're having now can help you feel like part of the larger human experience rather than feeling isolated and alienated.

When our inner critic starts pointing out our misdeeds and imperfections, it will often make us feel that everyone else is doing better, that we're the only ones who are this flawed. Self-criticism is much stronger when our suffering seems due to our own perceived failures and inadequacies than when it seems due to external circumstances. This is when self-compassion is the most precious.

How does one go about cultivating self-compassion? The good news is that intention is the most crucial component of treating yourself kindly.



p 130 - 131

Once you have the right mindset, how do you ensure the right behaviors? Effective listening means behaving in a way that makes whomever you're speaking with feel truly understood.

Good listeners know never, ever to interrupt - not even if the impulse to do so comes from excitement about something the other person just said. No matter how congratulatory and warm your input, it will always result in their feeling at least a twinge of resentment or frustration at not having been allowed to complete their sentence. One of my clients told me: "This one practice alone is worth its weight in gold. To stop interrupting others could be the single most important skill I've learned from working with you."

Great listeners know to let others interrupt them. When someone interrupts you, let them! Were they right to interrupt you? Of course not. But even if they were wrong, it's not worth making them feel wrong; your job instead is to make them feel right. In fact, if you notice the other person repeatedly agitating to speak, keep your sentences short and leave frequent pauses for them to jump in.

People really do love to hear themselves talk. The more you let them speak, the more they will like you....

Master listeners know one extra trick, one simple but extraordinarily effective habit that will make people feel truly listened to and understood: they pause before they answer.....


When someone has spoken, see if you can let your facial expression react first, showing that you're absorbing what they've just said and giving their brilliant statement the consideration it deserves. Only then, after about two seconds, do you answer. The sequence goes like this:

- They finish their sentence
- Your face absorbs
- Your face reacts
- Then, and only then, you answer

Now, I'm not saying this is easy. It takes confidence to bear silence, both because of the awkwardness you may feel and because of the uncertainty of not knowing what they're thinking during those two seconds. But it's worth it....


Great listening skills will give you presence - the foundation of charisma - and boost any charisma style.

  

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Topic Outline
Subject Author Message Date ID
Thanks for posting this, this is informative and good advice
Aug 19th 2017
1
you're welcome
Aug 19th 2017
2
      How is the book?
Aug 21st 2017
3
           I just went to the parts in the table of contents that interested me
Aug 21st 2017
4

obsidianchrysalis
Member since Jan 29th 2003
6207 posts
Sat Aug-19-17 05:41 PM

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1. "Thanks for posting this, this is informative and good advice"
In response to Reply # 0


  

          

The info about the benefits of self-compassion versus self-esteem.

I've struggles with assertiveness for much of my life and for much of that time I had a love / hate relationship with self-confidence. When I felt self-confident, many people were put off and when I lacked confidence I didn't perform very well in school and in friendships. Trying to incorporate a concerted effort to show compassion has helped my self-esteem but not because I function better in life, but because I value and appreciate myself, flaws, hang-ups, immaturity and all of the positive aspects of my personality.

The description of the observed benefits strengthens my motivation to deepen my love for myself in healthy ways.

  

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c71
Member since Jan 15th 2008
8786 posts
Sat Aug-19-17 08:16 PM

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2. "you're welcome"
In response to Reply # 1


  

          

glad to share info

  

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obsidianchrysalis
Member since Jan 29th 2003
6207 posts
Mon Aug-21-17 01:32 AM

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3. "How is the book?"
In response to Reply # 2


  

          

  

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c71
Member since Jan 15th 2008
8786 posts
Mon Aug-21-17 10:25 AM

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4. "I just went to the parts in the table of contents that interested me"
In response to Reply # 3


  

          

The parts about the different "Charisma styles" seemed "okay":

- Focus charisma
- Visionary charisma
- Kindness charisma
- Authority charisma

and choosing the right charisma based on your personality (what "fits" you, etc.)

From looking at the table of contents, I'm not sure of how much I would apply most of what the book is offering as it applies to developing a "charisma style" suitable for me, but....the info I extracted from the book for the OP seemed very worthwhile to share with OKP.

  

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